Ryan O'Neal
American actor
Ryan O'Neal
Charles Patrick Ryan O'Neal, Jr., better known as Ryan O'Neal, is an American actor best known for his appearances in the ABC nighttime soap opera Peyton Place and for his roles in such films as Paper Moon (1973), Stanley Kubrick's Barry Lyndon (1975), A Bridge Too Far (1977), and Love Story (1970), for which he received Academy Award and Golden Globe nominations as Best Actor. Since 2007 he has had a recurring role in the TV series Bones.
Biography
Ryan O'Neal's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Ryan O'Neal from around the web
The Apology That Never Came...
Huffington Post - 5 months
One of the most memorable cultural messages about apologies was in the 1970 movie Love Story, when Ali McGraw tearfully told Ryan O'Neal that oft-quoted line: "Love means never having to say you're sorry." I'm taking that as the Trump mantra. Because, after all, Donald Trump loves America. And everybody... the women, the blacks, the Mexicans, the Border Patrol... as Donald assures us... "They all love me." Less quoted was the comeback, just a few years later, in What's Up, Doc?, when Barbara Streisand said "Love means never having to say you're sorry" and a cockier Ryan O'Neal retorted with "That's the dumbest thing I ever heard." So what is it with apologies? Why do some feel hollow and empty while others elicit understanding or even forgiveness? What are the specific qualities of an authentic apology? For that I turned to Dr. Harriet Lerner, noted N.Y. Times best-selling author, and expert on apologies. Her soon-to-be-released book is titled Why Won't You Apologize? ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Stars of ‘Love Story’ Reunited at Harvard
Wall Street Journal - about 1 year
Nearly half a century after the movie "Love Story" was released, Ryan O’Neal and Ali MacGraw have returned to Harvard University, to reminisce about the film that made them household names. Mark Kelly reports. Image: Everett Collection
Article Link:
Wall Street Journal article
Ali MacGraw And Ryan O'Neal Had A Beautiful 'Love Story' Reunion At Harvard
Huffington Post - about 1 year
Some Hollywood love stories last forever. Or at least 45 years (which is basically forever).  On Monday, Ali MacGraw and Ryan O'Neal, who starred as Jenny Cavalleri and Oliver Barret in the classic film "Love Story," reunited at Harvard, the same campus where their characters first crossed paths. The film (based on the book by Erich Segal) is a tragic story that focuses on the romantic relationship between Jenny and Oliver. The two meet on campus, fall in love, get married and try to have a baby, only to find out (spoiler alert) Jenny is dying from cancer. In the final moments of the film, after telling his father that Jenny died, Oliver utters the iconic line: "Love means never having to say you're sorry." We get teary-eyed just thinking about it. More than four decades later, the pair got back together at the Ivy League university to take a little trip down memory lane. MacGraw, 76, and O'Neal, 74, are currently on tour with the play "Love Letters," in whic ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Trump to Star in Remake of 1970 Film
Huffington Post - over 1 year
Los Angeles. A source that wishes to remain anonymous has indicated to this reporter that Donald Trump will be starring in a remake of a famous 1970 romance. The original, which is considered one the most tear-producing movies of all time, starred Ali MacGraw and Ryan O'Neal. The Trump vehicle will have a different name and Mr. Trump will have no co-star. "They're all a bunch of losers," he is quoted as having said when asked about possible female leads. He then started gyrating and making contorted faces to ridicule the alleged disabilities of actresses. The source also reported that Mr. Trump plans to include in his version of the story a scene in which thousands of American Muslims cheer wildly as they watch the World Trade Center collapse in 2001. The scene will reportedly be filmed on a Hollywood back lot made to look like Jersey City. Another planned scene will have Mr. Trump allowing that a few Mexicans might be good people while he is saying that most of them are ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Ali MacGraw and Ryan O'Neal, 45 years later: 'Love Letters' loaded with nostalgia
LATimes - over 1 year
You could counterfeit money, risking jail time, or you could cast the stars of one of the most profitable romances in movie history and hit the road with a perennially popular stage show. The national tour of A.R. Gurney’s “Love Letters,” which launched this week at the Wallis Annenberg Center...
Article Link:
LATimes article
Ali MacGraw and Ryan O'Neal, 45 years later: 'Love Letters' loaded with nostalgia
LATimes - over 1 year
You could counterfeit money, risking jail time, or you could cast the stars of one of the most profitable romances in movie history and hit the road with a perennially popular stage show. The national tour of A.R. Gurney’s “Love Letters,” which launched this week at the Wallis Annenberg Center...
Article Link:
LATimes article
Ali MacGraw and Ryan O'Neal, 45 years later: 'Love Letters' loaded with nostalgia
LATimes - over 1 year
You could counterfeit money, risking jail time, or you could cast the stars of one of the most profitable romances in movie history and hit the road with a perennially popular stage show. The national tour of A.R. Gurney’s “Love Letters,” which launched this week at the Wallis Annenberg Center...
Article Link:
LATimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Ryan O'Neal
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2016
    Age 74
    In 2016, Ryan O'Neal reunited with Love Story co-star Ali MacGraw in a staging of A.R. Gurney's play Love Letters.
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  • 2014
    Age 72
    In her 2014 memoir, Anjelica Huston claimed that O'Neal physically abused her when they were in a relationship.
    More Details Hide Details For several years, O'Neal was estranged from his elder three children. However, in 2011, Tatum reconciled with her father with a book and a television show. On August 4, O'Neal, Tatum, and Patrick attended Redmond's court appearance on firearms and drug charges. O'Neal has nine grandchildren: three from Tatum's marriage to tennis player John McEnroe, four from both of Griffin's marriages, and two from Patrick's relationship with actress Rebecca De Mornay. He is a great-grandfather by his estranged son, Griffin. O'Neal said that in 2009 "I made a tremendous amount of money on real estate, more than I deserve."
  • 2012
    Age 70
    In April 2012, O'Neal revealed he had been diagnosed with stage IV prostate cancer.
    More Details Hide Details He reported that it had been detected early enough to give a prognosis of full recovery, although some doctors have questioned this prognosis. Based on various sources.
  • 2011
    Age 69
    In 2011, Ryan and Tatum attempted to restore their broken father/daughter relationship after 25 years.
    More Details Hide Details Their reunion and reconciliation process was captured in the Oprah Winfrey Network series, Ryan and Tatum: The O'Neals.
  • FIFTIES
  • 2001
    Age 59
    In 2001 he was diagnosed with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML).
    More Details Hide Details As of 2006, it is in remission. After struggling with leukemia, O'Neal was frequently seen at Fawcett's side when she was battling cancer. He told People magazine, "It's a love story. I just don't know how to play this one. I won't know this world without her. Cancer is an insidious enemy."
  • THIRTIES
  • 1979
    Age 37
    O'Neal was in a long-term relationship with actress Farrah Fawcett from 1979 until 1997.
    More Details Hide Details They then reunited in 2001 and were together until her death in 2009. He was previously married to actresses Joanna Moore and Leigh Taylor-Young; both marriages ended in divorce. He has four children: Tatum O'Neal and Griffin O'Neal (with Moore), Patrick O'Neal (with Taylor-Young), and Redmond James Fawcett O'Neal (with Fawcett; born January 30, 1985). "I got married at 20, and I was not a real mature 20," said O'Neal. "My first child was born when I was 21. I was a man’s man; I didn’t discover women until I was married, and then it was too late.” O'Neal had custody of Tatum and Griffin due to his first wife's drug and alcohol issues. He had romances with Ursula Andress, Bianca Jagger, Anouk Aimee, Jacqueline Bisset, Barbra Streisand, Lisa Taylor and Anjelica Huston.
  • 1978
    Age 36
    "What I have to do now, seriously, is win a few hearts as an actor," he said in 1978. "The way Cary Grant did.
    More Details Hide Details I know I've got a lot of winning to do. But I'm young enough. I'll get there " Around this time O'Neal was meant to star in The Bodyguard, from a Lawrence Kasdan script, opposite Diana Ross for director John Boorman. However the film fell over when Ross pulled out, and it would not be made until 1992, with Kevin Costner in O'Neal's old role. There was some talk he would appear in a film from Michelangelo Antonioni, Suffer or Die, but this did not eventuate. Instead O'Neal played a boxer in a comedy, The Main Event, reuniting him with Streisand. He received a fee of $1 million plus a percentage of the profits. The Main Event was a sizeable hit at the box office. A 1980 profile of Ryan O'Neal described the actor: Unlike most stars of the post-Hoffman era he is very handsome, especially when moustached: he has bond curly hair and a toothpaste smile: he seems to lead an interesting life. What is on screen is, er, less interesting, but still agreeable. Maybe he would really come on if he had the apprenticeship of the stars of the 30s: for he is, to underline the point, a throwback to that era. There are no nervous tics,solemnity is at bag; his is an easy, genial presence, and thank heaven for it!
  • 1975
    Age 33
    The resulting film was considered a commercial disappointment and had a mixed critical reception; it won O'Neal a Harvard Lampoon Award for the Worst Actor of 1975.
    More Details Hide Details Its reputation has risen in recent years but O'Neal says his career never recovered from the film's reception. O'Neal was reunited with Bogdanovich a third time in Nickelodeon (1976), alongside Tatum and Burt Reynolds, for a fee of $750,000. The film flopped at the box office. He followed this with a small role in the all-star war film A Bridge Too Far (1977), playing General James Gavin. O'Neal's performance as a hardened general was much criticised, although O'Neal was only a year older than Gavin at the time of the events in the film. "Can I help it if I photograph like I'm 16 and they gave me a helmet that was too big for my head?" he later said. "At least I did my own parachute jump." The film performed poorly at the US box office but did well in Europe.
  • 1973
    Age 31
    In 1973, O'Neal voted by exhibitors as the second most popular star in the country, behind Clint Eastwood.
    More Details Hide Details O'Neal spent over a year making Barry Lyndon (1975) for Kubrick.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1964
    Age 22
    In 1964 he was cast as Rodney Harrington in the prime time serial drama Peyton Place.
    More Details Hide Details The series was a big success, making national names of its cast including O'Neal. Several were offered movie roles, including Mia Farrow and Barbara Parkins. Eventually O'Neal was cast in the lead of The Big Bounce (1969), based on an Elmore Leonard novel. Then he played an Olympic athlete in The Games (1970). Neither film was particularly successful. The Games had been co written by Eric Segal, who recommended O'Neal for the lead in Love Story, based on Segal's novel and script. A number of actors had turned down the role including Beau Bridges and Jon Voight before it was offered to O'Neal. His fee was $25,000; he had an offer that paid five times as much to appear in a Jerry Lewis film but O'Neal knew that Love Story was the better prospect and selected that instead. "I hope the young people like it," he said before the film came out. I don't want to go back to TV. I don't want to go back to those NAB conventions."
  • 1962
    Age 20
    O'Neal appeared in guest roles on series that included The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis, Leave It to Beaver, Bachelor Father, Westinghouse Playhouse, Perry Mason and Wagon Train. From 1962 to 1963, he was a regular on NBC's Empire, another modern day western, where he played "Tal Garrett".
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1960
    Age 18
    O'Neal trained as an amateur boxer before beginning his career in acting in 1960.
    More Details Hide Details In 1964, he landed the role of Rodney Harrington on the ABC nighttime soap opera Peyton Place. The series was an instant hit and boosted O'Neal's career. He later found success in films, most notably Love Story (1970), for which he received Academy Award and Golden Globe nominations as Best Actor, What's Up, Doc? (1972), Paper Moon (1973), Stanley Kubrick's Barry Lyndon (1975), and A Bridge Too Far (1977). Since 2007, he has had a recurring role in the TV series Bones as Max, the father of series protagonist Dr. Temperance "Bones" Brennan. O'Neal was born in Los Angeles, the eldest son of actress Patricia Ruth Olga (née Callaghan; 1907–2003) and novelist and screenwriter Charles O'Neal. His father was of English and Irish descent, while his mother was of half Irish and half Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry. His brother, Kevin, is an actor and screenwriter.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1941
    Born
    Born on April 20, 1941.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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