Saint Patrick
Saint
Saint Patrick
Saint Patrick was a Romano-Briton and Christian missionary, who is the most generally recognized patron saint of Ireland or the Apostle of Ireland, although Brigid of Kildare and Colmcille are also formally patron saints. Two authentic letters from him survive, from which come the only universally accepted details of his life.
Biography
Saint Patrick's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Saint Patrick from around the web
Delta @ 20: Hows govs ruled the state – Comrade Macaulay - Vanguard
Google News - over 5 years
After that, you go about 500 metres of no development before you get to the hospital and after the hospital, you go about another 500 metres before you get to Saint Patrick's College, that was the end of Asaba. So what you see today, from the Summit
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Five Civic-Minded Stonehamites - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
Saint Patrick Parish Pastoral Associate Sr. Marylou Cassidy: "Pastoral Associate at St. Patrick's for the past 17 years she is the unsung hero to many who are experiencing death and dying, comforting those who are grieving and no one to turn to
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Helen “Marie” Legerski - Platte County Record Times
Google News - over 5 years
A funeral liturgy for Helen “Marie” Legerski, 75, will be held at 11:00 AM, Friday September 2, 2011 at Saint Patrick's Catholic Church in Wheatland, Wyoming with Father Tom Kadera as the Celebrant. Helen Marie (McCabe) Legerski went to be with the
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Community irked over frequent street closures in Chinatown - KHON2
Google News - over 5 years
On certain days of the year, Chinatown is the place to be whether it's Chinese New Year or Saint Patrick's Day. Those events have become woven into the fabric of the neighborhood. "You gotta follow the rules, you gotta let your neighbors know what
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Man charged over Saint Patrick's College fraud - 3News NZ
Google News - over 5 years
The man's charges relate to the alleged misappropriation of money at Kilbirnie's Saint Patrick's College. He was arrested earlier this week, and faces eight charges of dishonestly accessing a computer and one representative charge of money laundering,
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Saint Patrick's in Youngstown celebrating its centennial - WFMJ
Google News - over 5 years
"It brings everybody back to Saint Pat's. Maybe they haven't seen each other for years. So we brought them back. We have pictures up of all the classes so people can see their old school pictures, which is awesome. Everybody likes that," said
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St. Patrick's Cathedral to Hold 9/11 Memorial Mass - NBC New York
Google News - over 5 years
Saint Patrick's Cathedral will hold a special memorial Mass on Sunday, Sept. 11 to mark the 10th anniversary of the terror attacks. Archbishop Timothy Dolan will lead the Mass at 9 am, the New York Archdiocese said Tuesday
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Tommy Sharkey dies days after learning of deaths of 2 children in house fire - Daily Mail
Google News - over 5 years
Thomas Sharkey won a golf scholarship to Georgia Southern University in the US after leaving Our Lady and Saint Patrick's High in Dumbarton in 2008. In his biography on the Georgia Southern Eagles website, he described himself as 'ambitious and
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Monica 'Mona' Lisa Alonzo - Lexington Clipper Herald
Google News - over 5 years
Mass of Christian Burial will be 10 am, Saturday, July 30 at Saint Patrick's Catholic Church with the Rev. James Novakowski officiating. Inurnment will follow at the North Platte City Cemetery. Visitation will be Friday from 9 am to 9 pm at Adams and
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Around the Diocese - Intermountain Catholic
Google News - over 5 years
Saint Patrick Parish Festival Days — Friday Aug. 5 from 5 pm to 10 pm and Saturday Aug., 6 1 pm to 10 pm, at Saint Patrick Church, 1058 West 400 South, Salt Lake City. There will be ethnic foods, live entertainment, kids game booths, silent auction,
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Scenery, Adventure And Tradition In The West Of Ireland - The Chattanoogan
Google News - over 5 years
The annual trek is to pay homage to Saint Patrick, who according to legend, fasted at the summit for 40 days in 441 AD and then banished all the snakes and demons from Ireland. Some pilgrims even follow a tradition of climbing the 2500-foot summit
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Correction: Chesterton Saint Patrick ISTEP scores even higher - Chesterton Tribune
Google News - over 5 years
The grade-by-grade breakdown of the ISTEP scores published in Monday's Chesterton Tribune showed that St. Patrick School students posted some very high scores. But the scores in the story were in error.The results were for a different St. Patrick's
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Guitarist Richard Smith performing at Saint Patrick's Episcopal - Huntersville Herald
Google News - over 5 years
MOORESVILLE – Richard Smith, a finger-style guitarist who has toured the world, will perform July 31, a Sunday, at 7:30 pm at Saint Patrick's Episcopal Church, 201 Fairview Road. Smith performs a repertoire spanning an incredible range of musical
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Saint Patrick
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  • 1783
    Age -234
    Saint Patrick's Saltire is a red saltire on a white field. It is used in the insignia of the Order of Saint Patrick, established in 1783, and after the Acts of Union 1800 it was combined with the Saint George's Cross of England and the Saint Andrew's Cross of Scotland to form the Union Flag of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.
    More Details Hide Details A saltire was intermittently used as a symbol of Ireland from the seventeenth century, but without reference to Saint Patrick. It was formerly a common custom to wear a cross made of paper or ribbon on St Patrick's Day. Surviving examples of such badges come in many colours and they were worn upright rather than as saltires. Thomas Dinely, an English traveller in Ireland in 1681, remarked that "the Irish of all stations and condicõns were crosses in their hatts, some of pins, some of green ribbon." Jonathan Swift, writing to "Stella" of Saint Patrick's Day 1713, said "the Mall was so full of crosses that I thought all the world was Irish". In the 1740s, the badges pinned were multicoloured interlaced fabric. In the 1820s, they were only worn by children, with simple multicoloured daisy patterns. In the 1890s, they were almost extinct, and a simple green Greek cross inscribed in a circle of paper (similar to the Ballina crest pictured). The Irish Times in 1935 reported they were still sold in poorer parts of Dublin, but fewer than those of previous years "some in velvet or embroidered silk or poplin, with the gold paper cross entwined with shamrocks and ribbons".
    There are two main types of crosses associated with St. Patrick, the cross pattée and the saltire. The cross pattée is the more traditional association, while the association with the saltire dates from 1783 and the Order of St. Patrick.
    More Details Hide Details The cross pattée has long been associated with St. Patrick, for reasons that are uncertain. One possible reason is that bishops' mitres in Ecclesiastical heraldry often appear surmounted by a cross pattée. An example of this can be seen on the old crest of the Brothers of St. Patrick. As St. Patrick was the founding bishop of the Irish church, the symbol may have become associated with him. St. Patrick is traditionally portrayed in the vestments of a bishop, and his mitre and garments are often decorated with a cross pattée. The cross pattée retains its link to St. Patrick to the present day. For example,it appears on the coat of arms of both the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Armagh and the Church of Ireland Archdiocese of Armagh. This is on account of St. Patrick being regarded as the first bishop of the Diocese of Armagh. It is also used by Down District Council which has its headquarters in Downpatrick, the reputed burial place at St. Patrick.
  • 6320
    Writing on the Easter controversy in 632 or 633, Cummian—it is uncertain whether this is Cumméne Fota, associated with Clonfert, or Cumméne Find—does refer to Patrick, calling him "our papa", that is, pope or primate.
    More Details Hide Details Two works by late seventh-century hagiographers of Patrick have survived. These are the writings of Tírechán and the Vita sancti Patricii of Muirchú moccu Machtheni. Both writers relied upon an earlier work, now lost, the Book of Ultán. This Ultán, probably the same person as Ultan of Ardbraccan, was Tírechán's foster-father. His obituary is given in the Annals of Ulster under the year 657. These works thus date from a century and a half after Patrick's death. Tírechán writes, "I found four names for Patrick written in the book of Ultán, bishop of the tribe of Conchobar: holy Magonus (that is, "famous"); Succetus (that is, the god of war); Patricius (that is, father of the citizens); Cothirtiacus (because he served four houses of druids)." Muirchu records much the same information, adding that "his mother was named Concessa." The name Cothirtiacus, however, is simply the Latinized form of Old Irish Cothraige, which is the Q-Celtic form of Latin Patricius.
  • 5530
    Supporting the later date, the annals record that in 553 "the relics of Patrick were placed sixty years after his death in a shrine by Colum Cille" (emphasis added).
    More Details Hide Details The death of Patrick's disciple Mochta is dated in the annals to 535 or 537, and the early hagiographies "all bring Patrick into contact with persons whose obits occur at the end of the fifth century or the beginning of the sixth". However, E. A. Thompson argues that none of the dates given for Patrick's death in the Annals are reliable. Irish academic T. F. O'Rahilly proposed the "Two Patricks" theory which suggests that many of the traditions later attached to Saint Patrick actually concerned the aforementioned Palladius, who Prosper of Aquitaine's Chronicle says was sent by Pope Celestine I as the first bishop to Irish Christians in 431. Palladius was not the only early cleric in Ireland at this time. The Irish-born Saint Ciarán of Saigir lived in the later fourth century (352–402) and was the first bishop of Ossory. Ciaran, along with saints Auxilius, Secundinus and Iserninus, are also associated with early churches in Munster and Leinster. By this reading, Palladius was active in Ireland until the 460s.
  • 4610
    In 461/2 the annals say that "Here some record the repose of Patrick"; in 492/3 they record the death of "Patrick, the arch-apostle (or archbishop and apostle) of the Scoti", on 17 March, at the age of 120.
    More Details Hide Details While some modern historians accept the earlier date of c. 460 for Patrick's death, scholars of early Irish history tend to prefer a later date, c. 493.
  • 4570
    In 457 "the elder Patrick" is said to have died: this may refer to the death of Palladius, who according to the Book of Armagh was also called Patrick.
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