Salim Ali
Indian politician
Salim Ali
Sálim Moizuddin Abdul Ali was an Indian ornithologist and naturalist. Known as the "birdman of India", Salim Ali was among the first Indians to conduct systematic bird surveys across India and his bird books helped develop ornithology.
Biography
Salim Ali's personal information overview.
{{personal_detail.supertitle}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
Photo Albums
Popular photos of Salim Ali
Relationships
View family, career and love interests for Salim Ali
News
News abour Salim Ali from around the web
Top 10 Island Destinations in India - Siliconindia.com
Google News - over 5 years
The Church of St Bartholemew and the Church of Our Lady of Grace are the two churches that grab maximum tourist attention here. The place is also famous for the Salim Ali Bird Sanctury which houses a wide variety of birds
Article Link:
Google News article
Helping sparrows come home to nest - Times of India
Google News - over 5 years
The school has joined hands with Anaikatty-based Salim Ali Centre for Ornithology and Natural History (SACON) for this unique project. They aim to bring back the species to the neighbourhood by creating a natural habitat for them at their houses
Article Link:
Google News article
The last days of the urban jackal? - Deccan Chronicle
Google News - over 5 years
Jackals are shy and avoid disturbances,” said Honnavalli N. Kumara, a scientist from the Salim Ali Institute for Ornithology and Natural History (SACON), Coimbathore. Dr Nima Manjrekar, a wildlife biologist from Mysore, feels that the disappearance of
Article Link:
Google News article
Rise in temperature of Bharathapuzha river basin - IBNLive.com
Google News - over 5 years
MALAPPURAM: Researchers with the Environmental Impact Assessment division of the Salim Ali Centre for Ornithology and Natural History (SACON) have found that the temperature of the Bharathapuzha river basin has increased over a period of 36 years from
Article Link:
Google News article
Three persons consume phenyl in jail, rushed to hospital - IBNLive.com
Google News - over 5 years
Their condition was stated to be out of danger, he said. Jha said police has recovered several stolen articles as well as fire-arm from their possession. The accused have been identified as Salim Ali, Afroz Ali and Md. Salim alias Anna
Article Link:
Google News article
Woman glassed in Brighton jazz bar speaks out about the ordeal - The Argus
Google News - over 5 years
The 34-year-old, who does not want to be named, was approached by Salim Ali, 33, of Findon Road, Brighton, in the Casablanca club in Middle Street, on December 9, 2010. After a 'brief exchange of words' he pushed broken glass into her face leaving her
Article Link:
Google News article
Experts express concern over shrinkage of wetlands in state - Times of India
Google News - over 5 years
The lake was once the favourite bird watching spot for eminent ornithologist Dr Salim Ali of the Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS) and 186 species of migratory birds used to visit this magnificent lake in the past. Now only 15 species of migratory
Article Link:
Google News article
Mathare snatch win in Mombasa - SuperSport.com
Google News - over 5 years
We have claimed three points from a match played away from home and that will give us motivation as we move on to our next match,” said Coach Salim Ali after the match. He attributed Ruto's erratic performance to an injury suffered in the first half,
Article Link:
Google News article
KPL week 18 preview - SuperSport.com
Google News - over 5 years
Coach Salim Ali says that the weather will play a big factor with humidity and heat giving their opponents some advantage. Mathare has struggled to impress this season as the coach bloods the young players but their recent form shows a team getting
Article Link:
Google News article
Around Town - Mumbai Newsline
Google News - over 5 years
The police said Dinesh was assaulted by Gopal Gupta (22), Zakir Shaikh (19), Salim Ali (16) and Sonu Sayeed (17) on July 24. "Dinesh and his friend Sandeep Patoli met for drinks in Mankhurd. Later, Dinesh called up Gupta's wife who he was reportedly
Article Link:
Google News article
Salim Ali's landmark book on birds revised, updated - Times of India
Google News - over 5 years
Published in 1983, the book was authored by birdman of India Salim Ali and S Dillon Ripley. The revised version of the book has been titled Birds of the Indian Subcontinent - A Field Guide, and will contain information, illustrations and other features
Article Link:
Google News article
Ghana: Phone Repairer Gets 20 Years for Robbery - AllAfrica.com
Google News - over 5 years
The accused person, Abdul Salim Ali, alias KG, was accused of breaking into the home of the complainant in the middle of the night with two others, who are currently at large, and robbed his Toshiba laptop, Vodafone mobile phones and a Nokia mobile
Article Link:
Google News article
Guide to the Birds of the Indian Subcontinent - gulfnews.com
Google News - over 5 years
Mumbai: The Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS) is all set to launch the revised edition of A Pictorial Guide to the Birds of the Indian Subcontinent by Salim Ali and S Dillon in a new attractive 'avatar'
Article Link:
Google News article
Indian passport and visa centre opened - Oman Daily Observer
Google News - over 5 years
MUSCAT — Ambassador His Highness Sayyid Mohammed bin Salim Ali al Said, Chief of Protocol, was the chief guest at the formal inauguration ceremony of the centre for Indian Passport and Visa Services (IP&VSC) in Ruwi yesterday
Article Link:
Google News article
The team is improving - Salim Ali - SuperSport.com
Google News - over 5 years
Mathare United head coach Salim Ali says the barren draw against Gor Mahia was a sign of his team's resurgence in the second leg. Speaking after the final whistle at the Nyayo National Stadium, Ali said he was happy
Article Link:
Google News article
'Abducted villagers kept in Bangladesh' - Bangladesh News 24 hours
Google News - over 5 years
We have given all the details where they are kept and requested the BSF to hold a flag meeting the Bangladesh Border Guards, so that this point could be raised and necessary action taken," said Director General of Tripura police K Salim Ali
Article Link:
Google News article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Salim Ali
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1987
    Age 90
    Dr. Salim Ali died in 1987, at the age of 91 after a prolonged battle with prostate cancer in Mumbai.
    More Details Hide Details In 1990, the Sálim Ali Centre for Ornithology and Natural History (SACON) was established at Coimbatore by the Government of India.
  • 1986
    Age 89
    In the 1986 issue of the Journal of the BNHS he noted the role that it had played, the changing interests from hunting to conservation captured in 64 volumes that were preserved in microfiche copies, and the zenith that it had reached under the exceptional editorship of S H Prater.
    More Details Hide Details A two-volume compilation of his shorter letters and writings was published in 2007, edited by Tara Gandhi, one of his last students. Autobiography
  • 1985
    Age 88
    In 1985 he wrote his autobiography, The Fall of a Sparrow.
    More Details Hide Details Ali also wrote about his own vision for the Bombay Natural History Society, noting the importance of conservation related activities.
    He was also nominated to the Rajya Sabha in 1985.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1973
    Age 76
    The USSR Academy of Medical Sciences gave him the Pavlovsky Centenary Memorial Medal in 1973 and in the same year he was made Commander of the Netherlands Order of the Golden Ark by Prince Bernhard of the Netherlands.
    More Details Hide Details The Indian government decorated him with a Padma Bhushan in 1958 and the Padma Vibhushan in 1976.
  • 1969
    Age 72
    In 1969 he received the John C. Phillips memorial medal of the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1967
    Age 70
    In 1967 he became the first non-British citizen to receive the Gold Medal of the British Ornithologists' Union.
    More Details Hide Details In the same year, he received the J. Paul Getty Wildlife Conservation Prize consisting of a sum of $100,000, which he used to form the corpus of the Salim Ali Nature Conservation Fund.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1953
    Age 56
    Although recognition came late, he received several honorary doctorates and numerous awards. The earliest was the "Joy Gobinda Law Gold Medal" in 1953, awarded by the Asiatic Society of Bengal and was based on an appraisal of his work by Sunder Lal Hora (and in 1970 received the Sunder Lal Hora memorial Medal of the Indian National Science Academy).
    More Details Hide Details He received honorary doctorates from the Aligarh Muslim University (1958), Delhi University (1973) and Andhra University (1978).
  • FORTIES
  • 1939
    Age 42
    After Tehmina's death in 1939, Salim Ali stayed with his sister Kamoo and brother-in-law.
    More Details Hide Details In the course of his later travels, Ali rediscovered the Kumaon Terai population of the Finn's baya but was unsuccessful in his expedition to find the mountain quail (Ophrysia superciliosa), the status of which continues to remain unknown. Ali was not very interested in the details of bird systematics and taxonomy and was more interested in studying birds in the field. Ernst Mayr wrote to Ripley complaining that Ali failed to collect sufficient specimens: "as far as collecting is concerned I don't think he ever understood the necessity for collecting series. Maybe you can convince him of that." Ali himself wrote to Ripley complaining about bird taxonomy: Ali later wrote that his interest was in the "living bird in its natural environment." Salim Ali's associations with Sidney Dillon Ripley led to many bureaucratic problems. Ripley's past as an OSS agent led to allegations that the CIA had a hand in the bird-ringing operations in India.
  • 1938
    Age 41
    Whistler wrote to Ali on 24 October 1938:
    More Details Hide Details Whistler also introduced Salim to Richard Meinertzhagen and the two made an expedition into Afghanistan. Although Meinertzhagen had very critical views of him they became good friends. Salim Ali found nothing amiss in Meinertzhagen's bird works but later studies have shown many of his studies to be fraudulent. Meinertzhagen made his diary entries from their days in the field available and Salim Ali reproduces them in his autobiography: He was accompanied and supported on his early ornithological surveys by his wife, Tehmina, and was shattered when she died in 1939 following a minor surgery.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1930
    Age 33
    A popular article that he wrote in 1930 Stopping by the woods on a Sunday morning was reprinted in The Indian Express on his birthday in 1984.
    More Details Hide Details His most popular work was The Book of Indian Birds, written in the style of Whistler's Popular Handbook of Birds, first published in 1941 and subsequently translated into several languages with numerous editions. The first ten editions sold more than forty-six thousand copies. The first edition was reviewed by Ernst Mayr in 1943, who commended it while noting that the illustrations were not to the standard of American bird-books. His magnum opus was however the 10 volume Handbook of the Birds of India and Pakistan written with Dillon Ripley and often referred to as "the handbook". This work started in 1964 and ended in 1974 with a second edition completed after his death by others, notably J S Serrao of the BNHS, Bruce Beehler, Michel Desfayes and Pamela Rasmussen. A single volume "compact edition" of the "Handbook" was also produced and a supplementary illustrative work, A Pictorial Guide to the Birds of the Indian Subcontinent, by John Henry Dick and Dillon Ripley was published in 1983. The plates from this work were incorporated in the second edition of the "Handbook". He also produced a number of regional field guides, including The Birds of Kerala' (the first edition in 1953 was titled 'The Birds of Travancore and Cochin), The Birds of Sikkim, The Birds of Kutch (later as The Birds of Gujarat), Indian Hill Birds and Birds of the Eastern Himalayas. Several low-cost book were produced by the National Book Trust including Common Birds (1967) written with his niece Laeeq Futehally which was reprinted in several editions with translations into Hindi and other languages.
    On his return to India in 1930, he discovered that the guide lecturer position had been eliminated due to lack of funds.
    More Details Hide Details Unable to find a suitable job, Salim Ali and Tehmina moved to Kihim, a coastal village near Mumbai. Here he had the opportunity to study at close hand, the breeding of the baya weaver and discovered their mating system of sequential polygamy. Later commentators have suggested that this study was in the tradition of the Mughal naturalists that Salim Ali admired and wrote about. A few months were then spent in Kotagiri where he had been invited by K M Anantan, a retired army doctor who had served in Mesopotamia during World War I. He also came in contact with Mrs Kinloch, who lived at Longwood Shola, and her son-in-law R C Morris, who lived in the Biligirirangan Hills. He then discovered an opportunity to conduct systematic bird surveys of the princely states that included Hyderabad, Cochin, Travancore, Gwalior, Indore and Bhopal with the sponsorship of the rulers of those states. He was aided and supported in these surveys by Hugh Whistler who had surveyed many parts of India and had kept very careful notes. Interestingly, Whistler had initially been irritated by the unknown Indian. Whistler had in a note on The study of Indian birds mentioned that the long tail feathers of the greater racket-tailed drongo lacked webbing on the inner vane. Salim Ali wrote that such inaccuracies had been carried on from early literature and pointed out that it was incorrect on account of a twist in the rachis.
  • 1928
    Age 31
    He however tired of the job after two years and took a study leave in 1928 to Germany, where he was to work under Professor Erwin Stresemann at the Berlin Zoological Museum.
    More Details Hide Details Part of the work involved examining the specimens collected by J. K. Stanford in Burma. Stanford being a BNHS member had communicated with Claud Ticehurst and had suggested that he could work on his own with assistance from the BNHS. Ticehurst did not appreciate the idea of an Indian being involved in the work and resented even more, the involvement of Stresemann, a German. Ticehurst wrote letters to the BNHS suggesting that the idea of collaborating with Stresemann was an insult to Stanford. This was however not heeded by Reginald Spence and Prater who encouraged Ali to conduct the studies at Berlin with the assistance of Stresemann. In Berlin, Ali made acquaintance with many of the major German ornithologists of the time including Bernhard Rensch, Oskar Heinroth and Ernst Mayr apart from meeting other Indians in Berlin including the revolutionary Chempakaraman Pillai. Ali also gained experience in bird ringing at the Heligoland Bird Observatory.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1926
    Age 29
    He was hired as guide lecturer in 1926 at the newly opened natural history section in the Prince of Wales Museum in Mumbai for the salary of Rs 350 a month.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1918
    Age 21
    During this break in Bombay he was married to a distant relative, Tehmina in December 1918.
    More Details Hide Details Ali was fascinated by motorcycles from an early age and starting with a 3.5 HP NSU in Tavoy, he owned a Sunbeam, Harley-Davidsons (three models), a Douglas, a Scott, a New Hudson and a Zenith among others at various times. On invitation to the 1950 International Ornithological Congress at Uppsala in Sweden he shipped his Sunbeam aboard the SS Stratheden from Bombay and biked around Europe, injuring himself in a minor mishap in France apart from having several falls on cobbled roads in Germany. When he arrived on a fully loaded bike, just in time for the first session at Uppsala, word went around that he had ridden all the way from India! He regretted not having owned a BMW. Ali failed to get an ornithologist's position which was open at the Zoological Survey of India due to the lack of a formal university degree and the post went instead to M. L. Roonwal.
  • 1917
    Age 20
    On his return to India in 1917 after seven years, he decided to continue formal studies.
    More Details Hide Details He was to study commercial law and accountancy at Davar's College of Commerce. His true interest was however noticed by Father Ethelbert Blatter at St. Xavier's College and was persuaded to study zoology. After attending morning classes at Davar's College, he began to attend zoology classes at St. Xavier's College and was able to complete the course in zoology.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1913
    Age 16
    He was sent to Sind to stay with an uncle who had suggested that the dry air might help and on returning after such breaks in studies, he barely managed to pass the matriculation exam of the Bombay University in 1913.
    More Details Hide Details Salim Ali's early education was at St. Xavier's College, Mumbai. Following a difficult first year in college, he dropped out and went to Tavoy, Burma (Tenasserim) to look after the family's wolfram (tungsten) mining (tungsten was used in armour plating and was valuable during the war) and timber interests there. The forests surrounding this area provided an opportunity for Ali to hone his naturalist (and hunting) skills. He also made acquaintance with J C Hopwood and Berthold Ribbentrop who were with the Forest Service in Burma.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1896
    Born
    Born on November 12, 1896.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
All data offered is derived from public sources. Spokeo does not verify or evaluate each piece of data, and makes no warranties or guarantees about any of the information offered. Spokeo does not possess or have access to secure or private financial information. Spokeo is not a consumer reporting agency and does not offer consumer reports. None of the information offered by Spokeo is to be considered for purposes of determining any entity or person's eligibility for credit, insurance, employment, housing, or for any other purposes covered under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)