Samuel Goldwyn
Film producer
Samuel Goldwyn
Samuel Goldwyn, also known as Samuel Goldfish, was an American film producer. He was most well known for being the founding contributor and executive of several motion picture studios in Hollywood.
Biography
Samuel Goldwyn's personal information overview.
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MOVIE REVIEW | 'INSIDE OUT'; From Prison to Pickles
NYTimes - over 5 years
If Paul Levesque, the professional wrestler better known as Triple H, hopes to follow the career path of, say, Dwayne Johnson, who is now a credible action-adventure leading man, he's going to need movies a lot better than ''Inside Out'' to do it. Mr. Levesque plays A. J., just released after 13 years in prison for manslaughter and hoping to start
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Captivating Collaborator
NYTimes - over 5 years
SLEEPING WITH THE ENEMY Coco Chanel's Secret War By Hal Vaughan Illustrated. 279 pp. Alfred A. Knopf. $27.95. Gabrielle Chanel -- better known as Coco -- was a wretched human being. Anti-Semitic, homophobic, social climbing, opportunistic, ridiculously snobbish and given to sins of phrase-making like ''If blonde, use blue perfume,'' she was
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Was Coco Chanel a Nazi Agent? - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
As Vaughan notes, after she was lured by a million-dollar fee to spend a few weeks in Hollywood in 1930 — Samuel Goldwyn, he writes, “did his best to keep Jews away from Chanel” — she found herself compelled to run straight back to England,
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MOVIE REVIEW | 'A GOOD OLD FASHIONED ORGY'; A Bunch of Friends Who Want to Party Like It's 1979
NYTimes - over 5 years
A friendly, ramshackle comedy that is somewhat laugh-deficient, ''A Good Old Fashioned Orgy'' brings to mind ''Brave New World,'' Aldous Huxley's futuristic satire. The cheery maxim in Huxley's superficial paradise, which holds that ''everybody belongs to everyone else,'' is tested in ''A Good Old Fashioned Orgy'' and found to be true, sort of,
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The Whistleblower (R) - MiamiHerald.com
Google News - over 5 years
A Samuel Goldwyn Films release. Running time: 118 minutes. Vulgar language, nudity, sexual situations, graphic rape, strong adult themes. In Miami-Dade: Intracoastal; in Broward: Sunrise; in Palm Beach: Delray, Cinamax, Shadowood
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The cinema's serious season begins - The Republic
Google News - over 5 years
A GOOD OLD FASHIONED ORGY (Samuel Goldwyn): Jason Sudeikis stars in this comedy about a group of friends who decide to celebrate the sale of their friend's dad's summer home in the Hamptons by having an orgy there. Rated R. SHARK NIGHT 3D (Relativity
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"The Help" holds on at top of storm-hit box office - Reuters
Google News - over 5 years
Cast member Jessica Chastain poses at the premiere of the movie ''The Help'' at the Samuel Goldwyn Theatre in Beverly Hills, California August 9, 2011. By Lisa Richwine LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - The hard-working maids of "The Help" hung on to the top of
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How "The Help" grew into a box office phenomenon - Reuters
Google News - over 5 years
Cast member Jessica Chastain poses at the premiere of the movie ''The Help'' at the Samuel Goldwyn Theatre in Beverly Hills, California August 9, 2011. The movie opens in the US on August 10. By Fred Schruers LOS ANGELES (TheWrap.com) - The phenomenon
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The Caller Movie Review - Shockya.com
Google News - over 5 years
But rarely showing the enemy as she battles the hero, as seen in the new Samuel Goldwyn Films feature 'The Caller,' is a risky move that surprisingly paid off. Director Matthew Parkhill forgoed a continuous stream of intense stunts to instead focus on
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'The Help' Gets Help from Academy Audience - Reuters
Google News - over 5 years
The ensemble film, which was adapted from Kathryn Stockett's bestselling novel set in civil rights-era Mississippi, had its free screening for Academy members at AMPAS's Samuel Goldwyn Theater on Saturday afternoon. According to a member with no stake
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Father and Son Behind NFL Films Find Strength in Hall Trip
NYTimes - over 5 years
Few father-and-son acts have endured longer than Ed and Steve Sabol's. Ed founded NFL Films in 1962, and Steve perpetuated it with a creative buoyancy that matched his father's entrepreneurial zeal. Now, both are ill. Ed is 94. He nearly died from pneumonia last year and gets around in a wheelchair, difficult for a fizzy, rubbery-faced tummler who
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Exposing Injustices, the Real-Life Kind
NYTimes - over 5 years
''TERRIBLE injustices are happening all the time,'' the actress Rachel Weisz said, ''but only some of them make it to the screen.'' And most of those arrive in documentary form these days. The few features with a message that do make it to theaters often have a single individual at their center, like Karen Silkwood or Erin Brockovich, or a pair,
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THELMA AND LOUISE To Screen At Academy - We Are Movie Geeks
Google News - over 5 years
Beverly Hills, CA – The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will screen a new print of “Thelma & Louise” in celebration of the film's 20th anniversary on Thursday, August 25, at 7:30 pm at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills
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Exposing Injustices, the Real-Life Kind - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
It had its premiere last year at the Toronto International Film Festival, where it was sold to Samuel Goldwyn Films for distribution. But “The Whistleblower” still has to battle popular perception that a film “inspired by true events” is little more
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Academy Hosts New 20th Anniversary Print of Thelma and Louise and Q & A - Indie Wire (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The Academy screening will unspool on August 25th at 7:30 PM at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills, with an onstage discussion (moderated by Anne Thompson) with Davis, Khouri and producer Mimi Polk Gitlin. Tickets for Thelma & Louise will only
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Samuel Goldwyn
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1974
    Age 94
    Goldwyn died at his home in Los Angeles in 1974 from natural causes, at the probable age of 94.
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  • 1973
    Age 93
    His awards include the 1973 Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award, the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award in 1947, and the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award in 1958.
    More Details Hide Details Goldwyn was born Szmuel Gelbfisz in Warsaw, Kingdom of Poland, Russian Empire, to a Hasidic, Polish Jewish family. His parents were Aaron Dawid Gelbfisz (1852-1895), a peddler, and his wife, Hanna Reban (née Jarecka; 1855-1924). At an early age, he left Warsaw on foot and penniless. He made his way to Birmingham, United Kingdom, where he remained with relatives for a few years using the name Samuel Goldfish. He was 16 when his father died.
  • 1960
    Age 80
    There is a theater named after him in Beverly Hills and he received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1631 Vine Street for his contributions to motion pictures on February 8, 1960.
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  • 1959
    Age 79
    In his final film, made in 1959, Samuel Goldwyn brought together African-American actors Sidney Poitier, Dorothy Dandridge, Sammy Davis, Jr. and Pearl Bailey in a film rendition of the George Gershwin opera, Porgy and Bess.
    More Details Hide Details Released by Columbia Pictures, the film was nominated for three Oscars, but won only one. It was also a critical and financial failure, and the Gershwin family reportedly disliked the film and eventually pulled it from distribution. The film turned the opera into an operetta with spoken dialogue in between the musical numbers. Its reception was a huge disappointment to Goldwyn, who, according to biographer Arthur Marx, saw it as his crowning glory and had wanted to film Porgy and Bess since he first saw it onstage in 1935.
  • 1952
    Age 72
    In the 1950s Samuel Goldwyn turned to making a number of musicals including the 1952 hit Hans Christian Andersen (his last with Danny Kaye, with whom he had made many others), and the 1955 hit Guys and Dolls starring Marlon Brando, Jean Simmons, Frank Sinatra, and Vivian Blaine, which was based on the equally successful Broadway musical.
    More Details Hide Details This was the only independent film that Goldwyn ever released through MGM.
  • 1946
    Age 66
    In 1946, the year he was honored by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences with the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award, Goldwyn's drama, The Best Years of Our Lives, starring Myrna Loy, Fredric March, Teresa Wright and Dana Andrews, won the Academy Award for Best Picture.
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  • 1941
    Age 61
    Throughout the 1930s, Goldwyn released all his films through United Artists, but beginning in 1941, and continuing almost through the end of his career, Goldwyn released his films through RKO Radio Pictures.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1925
    Age 45
    In 1925, he married actress Frances Howard to whom he remained married for the rest of his life.
    More Details Hide Details Their son, Samuel Goldwyn, Jr., would eventually join his father in the business. Samuel Goldwyn's grandchildren include Goldwyn's relatives include Fred Lebensold (see Lebensold Family), an award-winning architect (best known as the designer of multiple concert halls in Canada and the United States). Fred was the son of Sam's younger sister, Manya (who, despite the best efforts of Sam and his brother Ben in 1939 and 1940, could not be extricated from the Warsaw Ghetto and perished in the Holocaust). Samuel Goldwyn's will created a multimillion-dollar charitable foundation in his name. Among other endeavors, the Samuel Goldwyn Foundation funds the Samuel Goldwyn Writing Awards, provided construction funds for the Frances Howard Goldwyn Hollywood Regional Library, and provides ongoing funding for the Motion Picture & Television Country House and Hospital. Several years after the Sr. Goldwyn's death, his son, Samuel Goldwyn Jr., initiated an independent film and television distribution company dedicated to preserving the integrity of Goldwyn's ambitions and work. The company's assets were later acquired by Orion Pictures, and in 1997, passed on to Orion's current parent company, MGM. Several years later, the Samuel Goldwyn Jr. Family Trust and Warner Bros. acquired the rights to all the Goldwyn-produced films except The Hurricane, which was returned to MGM division United Artists.
  • 1924
    Age 44
    Before the sale and merger of Goldwyn Pictures in April 1924, Goldwyn had established Samuel Goldwyn Productions in 1923 as a production-only operation (with no distribution arm).
    More Details Hide Details Their first feature was Potash and Perlmutter, released in September 1923 through First National Pictures. Some of the early productions bear the name "Howard Productions", named for Goldwyn's wife Frances Howard. For 35 years, Goldwyn built a reputation in filmmaking and developed an eye for finding the talent for making films. William Wyler directed many of his most celebrated productions, and he hired writers such as Ben Hecht, Sidney Howard, Dorothy Parker, and Lillian Hellman. (According to legend, at a heated story conference Goldwyn scolded someone—in most accounts Mrs. Parker, who recalled he had once been a glove maker—with the retort: "Don't you point that finger at me. I knew it when it had a thimble on it!" Another time, when he demanded a script that ended on a happy note, she said: "I know this will come as a shock to you, Mr. Goldwyn, but in all history, which has held billions and billions of human beings, not a single one ever had a happy ending.")
    On April 10, 1924, Goldwyn Pictures was acquired by Marcus Loew and merged into his Metro Pictures Corporation.
    More Details Hide Details Despite the inclusion of his name, Goldwyn had no role in the management or production at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1916
    Age 36
    In 1916, Goldwyn partnered with Broadway producers Edgar and Archibald Selwyn, using a combination of both names to call their movie-making enterprise Goldwyn Pictures.
    More Details Hide Details Seeing an opportunity, Samuel Gelbfisz then had his name legally changed to Samuel Goldwyn, which he used for the rest of his life. Goldwyn Pictures proved successful but it is their "Leo the Lion" trademark for which the organization is most famous.
    With the merger, Zukor became president of both Paramount and Famous Players-Lasky, with Goldwyn being named chairman of the board of Famous Players-Lasky, and Jesse Lasky first vice-president. After a series of conflicts with Zukor, Goldwyn resigned as chairman of the board, and as member of the executive committee of the corporation on September 14, 1916.
    More Details Hide Details Goldwyn was out as an active member of management, although he still owned stock and was a member of the board of directors. Famous Players-Lasky would later become part of Paramount Pictures Corporation, and Paramount would become one of Hollywood's major studios.
  • 1913
    Age 33
    In 1913, Goldwyn along with his brother-in-law Jesse L. Lasky, Cecil B. DeMille, and Arthur Friend formed a partnership, The Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Company, to produce feature-length motion pictures.
    More Details Hide Details Film rights for the stage play, The Squaw Man were purchased for $4,000 and Dustin Farnum was hired for the leading role. Shooting for the first feature film made in Hollywood began on December 29, 1913. In 1914, Paramount was a film exchange and exhibition corporation headed by W. W. Hodkinson. Looking for more movies to distribute, Paramount signed a contract with the Lasky Company on June 1, 1914 to supply 36 films per year. One of Paramount's other suppliers was Adolph Zukor's Famous Players Company. The two companies merged on June 28, 1916 forming The Famous Players-Lasky Corporation. Zukor had been quietly buying Paramount stock, and two weeks prior to the merger, became president of Paramount Pictures Corporation and had Hodkinson replaced with Hiram Abrams, a Zukor associate.
  • 1910
    Age 30
    From 1910 to 1915, Goldwyn was married to Blanche Lasky, a sister of Jesse L. Lasky.
    More Details Hide Details The marriage produced a daughter, Ruth.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1898
    Age 18
    In 1898, he emigrated to the United States, but fearing refusal of entry, he got off the boat in Nova Scotia, Canada, before moving on to New York in January 1899.
    More Details Hide Details He found work in upstate Gloversville, New York, in the bustling garment business. Soon his innate marketing skills made him a very successful salesman at the Elite Glove Company. After four years, as vice-president of sales, he moved back to New York City and settled at 10 West 61st Street.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1879
    Born
    Born on August 17, 1879.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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