Sarah Caudwell
English woman writer
Sarah Caudwell
Sarah Caudwell was the pseudonym of Sarah Cockburn, a British barrister and writer of detective stories. She is best known for a series of four murder stories written between 1980 and 1999, centred around the lives of a group of young barristers practicing in Lincoln’s Inn and narrated by a Hilary Tamar, a Professor of Medieval Law (gender unknown), who also acts as detective.
Biography
Sarah Caudwell's personal information overview.
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News
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Olivia Wilde a failli mourir sur le tournage de "Cowboys et envahisseurs" - RTL.be
Google News - over 5 years
... a écrit "Plus fort que le diable" sous l'identité de James Helvick. Sa première femme a été le modèle de Sally Bowles (Liza Minnelli dans "Cabaret") pour Christopher Isherwood. Et ma tante écrivait des romans policiers sous le pseudo de Sarah Caudwell
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The Real Name mystery - Network World
Google News - over 5 years
Sarah Caudwell (pseudonym of Sarah Cockburn, 1939-2000) was a British barrister and writer of detective stories. Sadly, she only finished four novels before her untimely death. Reviews of her work uniformly use words such as witty, delightful, clever,
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New & Noteworthy Paperbacks
NYTimes - over 15 years
GERTRUDE AND CLAUDIUS, by John Updike. (Ballantine, $12.95.) Far more than a pastiche, this prequel to ''Hamlet,'' chosen by the editors of the Book Review as one of the best books of 2000, invents sumptuous, deep lives for Hamlet's mother; her first husband, the king of Denmark; and his younger brother, Claudius, who seduces the queen and usurps
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NOTABLE BOOKS
NYTimes - about 16 years
This list has been selected from books reviewed since the Holiday Books issue of December 1999. It is meant to suggest some of the high points in this year's fiction and poetry, nonfiction, children's books, mysteries and science fiction. The books are arranged alphabetically under genre headings. The complete reviews of these books may be found at
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Crime
NYTimes - over 16 years
The wit, erudition and stylistic elegance that delighted us in the three previous novels of Sarah Caudwell, who died earlier this year in London, are abundantly at play in her final book, THE SIBYL IN HER GRAVE (Delacorte, $23.95). Thumbing her nose at the conventions of the well-made whodunit, Caudwell ransacks the literary forms that amuse her --
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Sarah Caudwell, 60, Lawyer And Author of Mystery Novels
NYTimes - about 17 years
Sarah Caudwell, the British author whose modest but ecstatically received output of three erudite and maliciously witty mystery novels led at least one critic to compare her to Oscar Wilde, died on Jan. 28 at her home in London. She was 60. The cause was cancer, said Barney Karpfinger, her agent. Ms. Caudwell produced her first novel, ''Thus Was
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Paid Notice: Deaths COCKBURN, SARAH
NYTimes - about 17 years
COCKBURN-Sarah Caudwell, MA (Aberdeen), BA, BCL (Oxon) daughter of Jean Ross Cockburn and Claud Cockburn, lawyer, Banker and crime writer. Beloved niece of Billee, beloved of her family and friends and, indeed, beloved of all who had the privilege to know her, has died aged 60, on January 28th at her home in Whitehall. A thanksgiving party in
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Along the Thames to the Great Port of London
NYTimes - over 26 years
LEAD: BY THE TIME IT REACHES Teddington, the Thames has come of age. It has left its birthplace 100 miles to the west, in the innocent hills of Gloucestershire; it has attended the university at Oxford, where it calls itself the Isis and carries undergraduates in punts to assignations under Magdalen Bridge; it has played an indispensable part in
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New & Noteworthy
NYTimes - over 26 years
LEAD: AFFLICTION, by Russell Banks. (Perennial/HarperCollins, $9.95.) In a small town in northern New Hampshire, a man becomes consumed by the mystery of his brother's strange disappearance. ''A novel of obsession is moving - is successful - in direct proportion to its ability to implicate the reader in its own warped and passionate view of the
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NOTABLE BOOKS OF THE YEAR
NYTimes - about 27 years
LEAD: This list has been selected from books reviewed since the Christmas issue of December 1988. It suggests only high points in the main fields of reader interest, and it does not include the titles chosen by the editors of The Book Review as the Best Books of 1989. Books are arranged alphabetically under subject headings. This list has been
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Close to Home
NYTimes - almost 28 years
LEAD: A GRAY squirrel roams the gardens outside my apartment, much cosseted by the neighbors and nervy to a fault. This squirrel peers in windows, frustrates the cat and appears to have no relatives. I like opening my shutters in the morning and finding him perched on the fence a few feet away. I like seeing him almost as much as A GRAY squirrel
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TELEVISION; A Stranger in a Strange Land
NYTimes - about 28 years
LEAD: On the morning of Jan. 4, 1945, an Englishwoman in her mid-30's walked up the stone steps of a grim office building in the Prinz Albrechtstrasse in Berlin to offer herself for interrogation by the Gestapo. On the morning of Jan. 4, 1945, an Englishwoman in her mid-30's walked up the stone steps of a grim office building in the Prinz
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Sarah Caudwell
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2000
    Age 60
    She died of cancer in January 2000 in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire.
    More Details Hide Details This series of four books, described as "legal whodunits", were written over a period of twenty years. Their primary setting is the top floor of 62 New Square at Lincoln's Inn, where four young barristers have their chambers: Michael Cantrip, Desmond Ragwort, Selena Jardine and Timothy Shepherd. While the last named only appears sporadically, taxes barrister Julia Larwood, who works in the adjacent premises, is a regular visitor and is in effect the fourth member of the group. These characters are in some ways thinly drawn, never communicating in anything other than in an ironic tone, so that even when they are in deadly danger the atmosphere remains uniformly light-hearted. Even though the characters are sexually active, their cheerful friendship is sometimes reminiscent of the chummy gangs encountered in juvenile fiction. Acting as a kind of parent to the group is the first-person narrator, Professor Hilary Tamar. Professor Tamar, a former tutor of Timothy Shepherd, also acts as the main detective, although other characters make contributions to the eventual solutions. Professor Tamar is frequently physically removed from the action and is kept informed by a series of improbably long letters and telexes. This distancing is amplified by Caudwell’s strategy of not specifying Tamar's sex and never specifying the reason for the strong bond which the character enjoys with the young advocates, notwithstanding the lack of any point of contact in terms of age, temperament, occupation or enthusiasms.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1995
    Age 55
    She also wrote a play, The Madman’s Advocate, which was given a rehearsed reading in Nottingham in 1995: a study of Daniel M'Naghten's attempt in 1843 to assassinate Sir Robert Peel and the resulting establishment of the M'Naghten Rule as a legal standard for defining the sanity of a defendant in law.
    More Details Hide Details Caudwell was nominated for the Best Novel award at the 1986 Anthony awards for The Shortest Way to Hades and won the 1990 award for The Sirens Sang of Murder in the same category. Hilary Tamar Stories Other Novel Contributions to anthologies
  • TWENTIES
  • 1966
    Age 26
    Having been called to the Bar, she practised as a Barrister for several years in Lincoln’s Inn, where she was admitted to and was entitled to practice in 1966, and later specialised in international tax planning at Lloyds Bank.
    More Details Hide Details It was at this time that she started to write. She was one of the first two female students to join the Oxford Union, having, legend has it, dressed up in men's clothes to protest against its male-only membership policy. She was thus one of the first female students to speak in the Oxford Union's Debating Chamber. She was a lifelong pipe-smoker, and inveterate crossword-puzzle solver, reaching the final of The Times Crossword Competition more than once. For many years she lived in Barnes, London with her mother and aunt.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1939
    Born
    Born in 1939.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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