Shelley Plimpton
American actor
Shelley Plimpton
Shelley Plimpton Carradine is an American former actress and Broadway performer. Plimpton was born in Roseburg, Oregon, to a father who ran an auto parts store. She is a "very distant" cousin of writer George Plimpton. She moved to New York with her researcher mother when she was 14, after her father died. Her acting career spanned from the mid 1960s to the mid 1970s.
Biography
Shelley Plimpton's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Shelley Plimpton from around the web
'Hair' today: Still growing - MiamiHerald.com
Google News - almost 6 years
Its cast included Diane Keaton, who would leave to star in Woody Allen's Play It Again Sam; Keith Carradine, whose romance with cast member Shelley Plimpton produced their daughter, actress Martha Plimpton; singer-actress Melba Moore and Rado and Ragni
Article Link:
Google News article
Go West, Young Man - Cinespect
Google News - almost 6 years
Idealistic, inquisitive Glen (Steve Curry) and his more pragmatic girlfriend Randa (Shelley Plimpton) are first seen in a state of nonchalant woodland nudity, such that one can't help but think of Adam and Eve. They periodically join up with other
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Google News article
MUSIC REVIEW | MARTHA PLIMPTON; From Tin Pan Alley to Springsteen With a Cockeyed Realist
NYTimes - about 7 years
A precociously mouthy brat with an attitude: that would describe Martha Plimpton, the fiercely talented singing actress who made her solo concert debut in the Allen Room on Saturday evening as part of Lincoln Center's American Songbook series. Ms. Plimpton, now 39, hasn't lost the brash, fighting spirit of a rebellious tomboy who grew up on the
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NYTimes article
A NIGHT OUT WITH | MARTHA PLIMPTON; Old Hand, New Hands
NYTimes - about 8 years
A HALF-HOUR after finishing her night's work in ''Pal Joey,'' Martha Plimpton walked into the Grill at the Players, a private club across from Gramercy Park. With her were four ''Pal Joey'' colleagues -- Lisa Gajda, Kathryn Mowat Murphy, Abbey O'Brien and Krista Saab -- the female dancers from the Roundabout Theater Company revival of the 1940
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NYTimes article
So Odd, But Lately In Classic Fashion
NYTimes - over 9 years
ON a break from rehearsals for ''Cymbeline'' at Lincoln CenterMartha Plimpton dashed outside for a cigarette and immediately ran into a classmate from her alma mater, the nearby Professional Children's School. It turned out he too was still performing, as a dancer at the Met. They chatted briefly about work and compared notes about Lincoln Center's
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NYTimes article
THEATER; An Opportune Time To Get in Touch With His Inner Scoundrel
NYTimes - over 10 years
KEITH CARRADINE, who made his name as the low-key folk singer the ladies could not resist in the movie ''Nashville'' some 30 years ago, stepped into ''Dirty Rotten Scoundrels'' on Friday. As the role, originated by John Lithgow, involves the fleecing of ladies, the question for this 56-year-old actor is whether he has ever been a scoundrel. He is
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NYTimes article
THEATER;This Silent Man Has Playwrights as Groupies
NYTimes - about 21 years
DURING THE EARLY REHEARSALS OF "The Heidi Chronicles," the play that would eventually earn her a Pulitzer Prize, Wendy Wasserstein was tormented by doubt. Not over the play. Over what the director, Daniel Sullivan, really thought of it. The dark, intense Mr. Sullivan, a solidly built man who looks a little like a character out of a Dostoyevsky
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NYTimes article
LIGHTING A CANDLE FOR 'HAIR' AT 25: SHELLEY PLIMPTON; 'It Makes Me Feel Good to Know I Contributed to the World'
NYTimes - almost 24 years
"Yes, you can say I'm a housewife now." Shelley Plimpton is serving homemade asparagus soup and bread on the wooden deck of her Seattle home. "That's O.K.," she insists. "It's what I am. Very middle class." As Crissy, the lost waif in "Hair," she earned $130 a week, sang the musical's most poignant number, "Frank Mills," and won admiring notices
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Shelley Plimpton
    TWENTIES
  • 1969
    Age 21
    Plimpton also appeared in the 1969 Robert Downey, Sr. film Putney Swope as one half of an interracial college couple ("It started last weekend at the Yale-Howard game") in a satire of a pimple cream TV spot.
    More Details Hide Details She sings a duet, in which she concludes: "My man uses Face Off / He's really out of sight, and so are his pimples." Plimpton is the mother of actress Martha Plimpton (from a relationship with actor Keith Carradine) and a former wife of theatre director Daniel Sullivan (who worked as an assistant director on Hair.)
  • TEENAGE
  • 1967
    Age 19
    She created the role of "Crissy" in the original 1967 Off-Broadway production of Hair, and continued the role as a member of the original Broadway cast when the production moved to Broadway in 1968.
    More Details Hide Details In both productions, she sang the song "Frank Mills". Shelley Plimpton took a leave of absence from HAIR to appear in Arlo Guthrie's film: Alice's Restaurant, playing a fourteen year old fan who wanted to sleep with Arlo, but he gently rejects her advances, giving her his bandana as a souvenir and saying simply "I just don't want to catch your cold."
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1947
    Born
    Born on February 27, 1947.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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