Sidney Lumet
American film director
Sidney Lumet
'Sidney Arthur Lumet was an American director, producer and screenwriter with over 50 films to his credit. He was nominated for the Academy Award as Best Director for 12 Angry Men, Dog Day Afternoon (1975), Network (1976) and The Verdict (1982). He did not win an individual Academy Award, but he did receive an Academy Honorary Award and 14 of his films were nominated for various Oscars, such as Network, which was nominated for 10, winning 4.
Biography
Sidney Lumet's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Sidney Lumet from around the web
Arthur Miller's 'A View From The Bridge' Is A Cold War Political Allegory As Well As A Family Tragedy
Huffington Post - 5 months
Frederick Weller (center) in "'A View From the Bridge" at the Ahmanson Theater in Los Angeles Last year, the 100th anniversary of playwright Arthur Miller's birth, saw a remarkable revival of five of his plays. "A View From the Bridge" and "The Crucible" opened on Broadway. A staging of "Incident at Vichy" took place Off-Broadway. The New Yiddish Rep staged a Yiddish version of his most famous work, "Death of a Salesman" (with English subtitles). Miller's lesser-known play "Broken Glass" opened at the Westport Country Playhouse in Connecticut. Ivo van Hove's production of "A View From the Bridge" generated the most interest because of the unusual staging. It got rave reviews in London (winning the Olivier award) and had a similar reception last year in New York (winning the Tony award). That production recently opened at the Ahmanson Theater in Los Angeles and I saw it on Thursday night. I've seen the play at least five times and it is my third favorite among Miller's plays, ...
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Huffington Post article
Watch This Natural Hair Beauty Guru Transform Into 'The Wiz' Characters
Huffington Post - over 1 year
We can't remember how many times we've watched Sidney Lumet's "The Wiz." The 1978 American musical film, which starred style icons Diana Ross as Dorothy and Michael Jackson as Scarecrow, is forever etched into our childhood memories. In fact, we can still sing the lyrics to "You Can't Win" without missing a beat. So you can imagine how elated we were to discover that one of our favorite natural hair vloggers created a beauty tutorial inspired by NBC's upcoming telecast of "The Wiz Live!"   Whitney White, better known as Naptural85, used her impressive hair and makeup skills to transform into five main characters: Dorothy, Glinda the Good Witch, Scarecrow, Tin Man and The Cowardly Lion. White's thick, curly hair is obviously the focal point in these tutorials, as she spritzed it with temporary hair color sprays and even added wheat, hay and leaves for extra flair. With so much styling, we love how she incorporated hydrating creams and set her strands in two-strand tw ...
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Huffington Post article
Watch This Natural Hair Beauty Guru Transform Into 'The Wiz' Characters
Huffington Post - over 1 year
We can't remember how many times we've watched Sidney Lumet's "The Wiz." The 1978 American musical film, which starred style icons Diana Ross as Dorothy and Michael Jackson as Scarecrow, is forever etched into our childhood memories. In fact, we can still sing the lyrics to "You Can't Win" without missing a beat. So you can imagine how elated we were to discover that one of our favorite natural hair vloggers created a beauty tutorial inspired by NBC's upcoming telecast of "The Wiz Live!"   Whitney White, better known as Naptural85, used her impressive hair and makeup skills to transform into five main characters: Dorothy, Glinda the Good Witch, Scarecrow, Tin Man and The Cowardly Lion. White's thick, curly hair is obviously the focal point in these tutorials, as she spritzed it with temporary hair color sprays and even added wheat, hay and leaves for extra flair. With so much styling, we love how she incorporated hydrating creams and set her strands in two-strand twists ...
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Huffington Post article
Maureen O'Hara: The Roads to Recognition, Co-Starring Lillian Gish and Robert Altman
Huffington Post - over 1 year
"This is what it's all about." -- Harvey Weinstein to Benedict Cumberbatch and director Morten Tyldum on leaving the Governors Awards, November 9, 2014 * * * The midnight blue of the bracing Idaho sky was the color of her beaded gown, reflecting the sparkle in her green eyes. The legendary red hair was perfectly coiffed; the tasteful diamond bracelets added a touch of glamour. The high-powered audience, gathered in the heart of Hollywood at the beginning of awards season, suddenly quieted as the evening began with a film tribute honoring the ravishingly beautiful actress who never gave less than a perfect performance in her seven-decade career. Martin Scorsese defined her impact: "She started at the very top, at age 18, starring with and working with the best and most brilliant-- only to remain there." After Liam Neeson reflected on his infatuation in seeing THE QUIET MAN, and Clint Eastwood, as a Universal contract player, told of his attempts to get close to LADY GODIVA, ...
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Huffington Post article
A Brief (Pun Intended) History of Lawyers in Movies, Part II
Huffington Post - almost 2 years
Lawyers in motion pictures have been portrayed as one of two extremes, devils or angels, almost since celluloid was invented. The first film dealing specifically with a law firm and attorneys, 1933's Counsellor at Law, starring John Barrymore, portrayed its J.D.s as upstanding citizens, as did the early Perry Mason films of the same period. This quickly changed, however, with many attorneys portrayed as being capable of the same brand of skullduggery as their shifty clients. With that in mind, we bring you a list of the good, the bad and the ugly of lawyers in movies. Enjoy, and please refrain from suing us if you feel otherwise... 1. Devil's Advocate (1997) Keanu Reeves plays Kevin Lomax, a hot-shot young Florida lawyer who is all about climbing the ladder. When he gets an offer he can't refuse from a high-powered New York firm, led by the legendary John Milton (Al Pacino). Soon Kevin's wife (Charlize Theron) is plagued by demonic visions and he realizes he's literally so ...
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Huffington Post article
A Brief (Pun Intended) History of Lawyers in Movies
Huffington Post - almost 2 years
Lawyers in motion pictures have been portrayed as one of two extremes, devils or angels, almost since celluloid was invented. The first film dealing specifically with a law firm and attorneys, 1933's Counsellor at Law, starring John Barrymore, portrayed its J.D.s as upstanding citizens, as did the early Perry Mason films of the same period. This quickly changed, however, with many attorneys portrayed as being capable of the same brand of skullduggery as their shifty clients. With that in mind, we bring you a list of the good, the bad and the ugly of lawyers in movies. 1. To Kill a Mockingbird (1962) Gregory Peck's Atticus Finch became the boilerplate for the Noble Movie Lawyer in this iconic, 1962 adaptation of Harper Lee's award-winning novel. Atticus Finch, a small town attorney in the Depression-era South, must defend a black man (Brock Peters) falsely accused of raping a white woman, causing the already-divided town's racial tensions to boil over. Through it all, ...
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Huffington Post article
<i>Twelve Angry Men</i>: What're They So Pissed Off About Anyway?
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Anger is a complex emotion. It can help us survive (the infant fought off the assailant with her bare baby hands!); it can lead us towards justice (no justice, no peace!); it can make us sick (after years of incarceration, now cancer). So it's only fitting that a play titled Twelve Angry Men, opening this week at The Pasadena Playhouse (cast photo below) would hold some of that energy. (L-R) Scott Lowell, Adam J. Smith, Gregory North, Robert Picardo, Clinton Derricks-Carroll, Barry Pearl, Bradford Tatum, Ellis E. Williams, Jason George, Adolphus Ward. Photo by Jim Cox. Originally written by Reginald Rose and produced for television in 1954, it's been adapted numerous times for stage and film and is perhaps best known for the Academy-Award nominated feature directed by Sidney Lumet and starring Henry Fonda. Sheldon Epps, the play's director, says in a press statement: ... our production will incite conversations about racial issues, perception, and discrimination that are at ...
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Huffington Post article
'I Never Expected To Work In Television Again'
Popeater - over 3 years
"Homeland's" Mandy Patinkin has made no secret of his tumultuous TV past, having famously quit "Criminal Minds" because of the dark subject matter by reportedly not showing up to a table read, and exiting "Chicago Hope" at the height of its success to be closer to his family. "The biggest public mistake I ever made was that I chose to do 'Criminal Minds' in the first place," Patinkin recently told New York Magazine. "I thought it was something very different. I never thought they were going to kill and rape all these women every night, every day, week after week, year after year. It was very destructive to my soul and my personality." In a new interview with the New York Times, the 60-year-old actor again addressed his previous on-set behavior, admitting that a personal issue may have influenced his decision to take "Criminal Minds." "When ‘Criminal Minds’ came along, I had just survived the discovery that I had prostate cancer, so I guess I had that vulnerability," ...
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Popeater article
Kristin McCracken: The Dog to Premiere at Toronto International Film Festival: True Story Behind Dog Day Afternoon
Huffington Post - over 3 years
On August 22, 1972, John Wojtowicz and two accomplices attempted to rob a bank in Brooklyn. Things didn't go as planned: first, one of the accomplices ran out, not able to go through with it. Then, after letting one of the bank tellers go to the bathroom, John and his accomplice Sal found themselves in the bank surrounded by the NYPD, the FBI, and an ever-growing rowdy Brooklyn crowd of bystanders. What was supposed to be a gun-and-run robbery became a 14-hour standoff, with nine bank employees held as hostages. The whole incident played out in dramatic fashion on television. As the FBI tried to negotiate with Wojtowicz, he revealed his reason for the robbery: he needed the funds to pay for his lover's sex-change operation. As one reporter stated, "Nothing like this had really happened before." The story was turned into Sidney Lumet's 1975 film Dog Day Afternoon, with Al Pacino playing the quirkily charismatic and unforgettable "Sonny," based on Wojtowicz. The film ea ...
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Huffington Post article
Christopher Rosen: More Than Just The 'New Girl'
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Zooey Deschanel and M. Ward, the she and him of She &amp; Him, hit a sweltering New York on Saturday night to play the first of their two concerts on Central Park's SummerStage. "Is anyone here from Ottawa?" Deschanel asked at one point in the show, a reference to where She &amp; Him played on July 4, and the kind of of course non sequitur fans might expect from the "New Girl" star and empress of all things quirk. Yet despite Deschanel's de rigueur bangs, made(well)-to-order attire and an overall sense of twee emanating from the stage, She &amp; Him put on a very solid, low-key show, one that the band's fans seemed to enjoy even while sweating out of pores they likely didn't realize existed. (It was such a hot night in New York on Saturday that even the late Sidney Lumet would have said, "Too much.") "Enjoy the show they have put together in 3D," stressed signs posted around the venue, urging attendees to put their phones away during the She &amp; Him performance. It di ...
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Huffington Post article
Robert Redford's Big Return
Huffington Post - almost 4 years
LOS ANGELES — Robert Redford does his most compelling work in some time as both actor and director in "The Company You Keep," a tense yet admirably restrained thriller about a fugitive forced out of hiding after 30 years to prove his innocence. Adapted with clarity and intelligence by Lem Dobbs from Neil Gordon's novel, and lent distinguishing heft by its roster of screen veterans, this gripping drama provides an absorbing reflection on the courage and cost of dissent. Recalling aspects of Sidney Lumet's poignant "Running on Empty" from 1988, but with a more subdued emotional palette, the film opens with vintage-style news footage detailing charges against members of radical antiwar group the Weather Underground in the early 1970s for plotting to blow up buildings in multiple U.S. cities. A second report follows, attributing responsibility to the same group for a Michigan bank robbery during which a security guard was killed. While the robbers were identified, only one was ...
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Huffington Post article
Marshall Fine: Movie review: The Company You Keep
Huffington Post - almost 4 years
There aren't many filmmakers creating the kind of chewy, talkative dramas about real issues that used to be a staple of movie-going because, well, the audience willing to sit still for them is aging out and dying off. So bless Robert Redford: While The Company You Keep can't sustain itself as the kind of thriller it's being pitched as, it's still a thoughtful, provocative story about the continuing battle between idealism and cynicism. Unfortunately for this film (as with Redford's bitterly underappreciated 2007 film Lions for Lambs), cynicism seems to be winning. The story, such as it is, mirrors (in a way) Sidney Lumet's Running on Empty, a 1988 film that seemed to muddle its politics in a story of teen romance. Redford has more on his mind, in a story that echoes the Weather Underground's Brinks armed-car robbery in 1981 in Nyack, NY. So his story starts with Susan Sarandon, looking like a middle-aged soccer mom, being surrounded by cops as she fills her car at a s ...
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Huffington Post article
7 Films to Help You Work Through Labor Day
Agoura Hills - over 4 years
It’s that time of year again. Summer is ending. The school year beginning and you’re not supposed to wear white belts or white shoes anymore. Yes, it’s Labor Day. So seek out Redbox, Blockbuster or Netflix, because here is a list of seven movies about the working world to enjoy on your day off. (Click the titles to see movie trailers.) Office Space (1999, Mike Judge) After his hypnotherapist dies in the middle of a session, Peter Gibbons, (Ron Livingston), is left with a permanent hypnotic suggestion to do whatever he damn well pleases. His new-found nonchalance turns his life around, gets him a promotion and makes him the envy of everyone at the office. But, things get more complicated when he helps some of his laid off friends in a get rich quick scheme that gets them far too rich, far too quickly.  One of the most popular movies that no one ever saw in the theater, Office Space is a quick-witted and endlessly quotable comedy about hating your job and learning to love your l ...
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Agoura Hills article
New DVD Blu-Ray: 'The Five-Year Engagement,' 'Safe'
Deadline Hollywood - over 4 years
Moviefone's Pick of the Week "The Five-Year Engagement" What's It About? Jason Segel and Emily Blunt play a happily devoted couple whose impending nuptials keep getting delayed by her rising career. See It Because: Segel re-teams with his "Forgetting Sarah Marshall" co-writer and director for another romantic comedy that's very R-rated. It's a little too long, but with a supporting cast including players from "The Office," "Parks &amp; Rec," "30 Rock" and "Community," it's pretty much an all-star team of funny people. (Also Available on Amazon Instant Video) New on DVD &amp; Blu-ray "High School" What's It About? An MIT-bound star scholar tries weed for the first time, the night before his psycho principal (Michael Chiklis) imposes a school-wide drug test. In order to get away with his crime, he concocts a ridiculous plan to get the entire school stoned -- with the help of even more psycho dealer (Adrien Brody). In the end, an interesting cast and a ridiculous-in-a-good- ...
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Deadline Hollywood article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Sidney Lumet
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2011
    Age 86
    In October 2011, the organization Human Rights First inaugurated its "Sidney Lumet Award for Integrity in Entertainment" for the TV show, The Good Wife, along with giving awards to two Middle East activists who had worked for freedom and democracy.
    More Details Hide Details Lumet had worked with Human Rights First on a media project related to the depiction of torture and interrogation on television. The following films directed by Lumet have received Academy Awards and nominations: Berlin International Film Festival British Academy Film Awards Cannes Film Festival New York Film Critics Circle Awards Venice Film Festival
    A few months after Lumet's death in April 2011, TV commentator Lawrence O'Donnell aired a tribute to Lumet, and a retrospective celebration of his work was held at New York's Lincoln Center with the appearance of numerous speakers and film stars.
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    Lumet died at the age of 86 on April 9, 2011, in his residence in Manhattan, from lymphoma.
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  • 2007
    Age 82
    Critic Justin Chang adds that Lumet's skill as a director and in developing strong stories, continued up to his last film in 2007, noting that his "nimble touch with performers, his ability to draw out great warmth and zesty humor with one hand and coax them toward ever darker, more anguished extremes of emotion with the other, was on gratifying display in his ironically titled final film, Before the Devil Knows You're Dead."
    More Details Hide Details In the same interview with New York magazine, he said he expects to see more directors from different ethnic backgrounds and communities, telling their stories. "You know, I started out making films about Jews and Italians and Irish because I didn't know anything else."
  • 2005
    Age 80
    In 2005, Lumet received an Academy Award for Lifetime Achievement for his "brilliant services to screenwriters, performers, and the art of the motion picture."
    More Details Hide Details Upon winning recognition from the Academy, Lumet said, "I wanted one, damn it, and I felt I deserved one." Nonetheless, director Spike Lee commented that "his great work lives on with us forever. Much more important than Oscar. Ya-dig?"
    He did not win an individual Academy Award, although he did receive an Academy Honorary Award in 2005 and 14 of his films were nominated for various Oscars, such as Network, which was nominated for 10, winning 4.
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  • 1997
    Age 72
    When asked in a 1997 interview about how he wanted to "go out," Lumet responded, "I don't think about it.
    More Details Hide Details I'm not religious. I do know that I don't want to take up any space. Burn me up and scatter my ashes over Katz's Delicatessen." Following his death, numerous tributes have been paid for his enduring body of work, marked by many memorable portrayals of New York City. Fellow New York directors Woody Allen and Martin Scorsese both paid tribute to Lumet. Allen called him the "quintessential New York film-maker", while Scorsese said "our vision of the city has been enhanced and deepened by classics like Serpico, Dog Day Afternoon and, above all, the remarkable Prince of the City." Lumet also drew praise from New York mayor Michael Bloomberg, who called him "one of the great chroniclers of our city". Lumet was called "the last of the great movie moralists" in a tribute remembering a career in which he "guided many of the world's most respected actors through roles that connected with the conscience of multiple generations."
  • 1990
    Age 65
    He had two daughters by Jones: Amy, who was married to P. J. O'Rourke from 1990–1993, and actress/screenwriter Jenny, who had a leading role in his film Q & A. She also wrote the screenplay for the 2008 film Rachel Getting Married.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1962
    Age 37
    He later directed a live television version of Eugene O'Neill's The Iceman Cometh, which was followed by his 1962 film, A View from the Bridge, another psychological drama from a play written by Arthur Miller. This was followed by another Eugene O'Neill play turned to cinema, Long Day's Journey into Night, in 1962, with Katharine Hepburn gaining an Oscar nomination for her performance as a drug-addicted housewife; the four principal actors swept the acting awards at the 1962 Cannes Film Festival.
    More Details Hide Details It was also voted one of the year's "Ten Best Films" by The New York Times. Film critic Owen Gleiberman has observed that Lumet was a "hardboiled straight-shooter," who, because he was trained during the golden Age of television in the 1950s, became noted for his energetic style of directing. The words "Sidney Lumet" and "energy," he adds, became synonymous: "The energy was there in the quietest moments. It was an inner energy, a hum of existence that Lumet observed in people and brought out in them... he went into the New York streets... he made them electric: Lumet generally insisted on the collaborative nature of film, sometimes ridiculing the dominance of the "personal" director, writes film historian Frank P. Cunningham. As a result, Lumet became renowned among both actors and cinematographers for his openness to sharing creative ideas with the writer, actor, and other artists. Lumet "has no equal in the distinguished direction of superior actors," adds Cunningham, with many coming from the theater. He was able to draw powerful performances from acting luminaries such as Ralph Richardson, Marlon Brando, Richard Burton, Katharine Hepburn, James Mason, Sophia Loren, Geraldine Fitzgerald, Blythe Danner, Rod Steiger, Vanessa Redgrave, Paul Newman, Sean Connery, Henry Fonda, Dustin Hoffman, Albert Finney, Simone Signoret, and Anne Bancroft. "Give him a good actor, and he just might find the great actor lurking within", wrote film critic Mick LaSalle.
  • 1960
    Age 35
    A controversial TV show he directed in 1960 gained him notoriety: The Sacco-Vanzetti Story on NBC.
    More Details Hide Details According to The New York Times, the drama drew flack from the state of Massachusetts (where Sacco and Vanzetti were tried and executed) because it was thought to postulate that the condemned murderers were, in fact, wholly innocent. But the brouhaha actually did Lumet more good than harm, sending several prestigious film assignments his way.
  • 1959
    Age 34
    He began adapting classic plays for both film and television. In 1959, he directed Marlon Brando, Joanne Woodward and Anna Magnani in the feature film The Fugitive Kind, based on the Tennessee Williams play Orpheus Descending.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1950
    Age 25
    Lumet began his career as a director with Off-Broadway productions and then evolved into a highly respected TV director. After working off-Broadway and in summer-stock, he began directing television in 1950, after working as an assistant to friend and then-director Yul Brynner.
    More Details Hide Details He soon developed a "lightning quick" method for shooting due to the high turnover required by television. As a result, while working for CBS he directed hundreds of episodes of Danger (1950–55), Mama (1949–57), and You Are There (1953–57), a weekly series which co-starred Walter Cronkite in one of his earliest leading roles. He chose Cronkite for the role of anchorman "because the premise of the show was so silly, was so outrageous, that we needed somebody with the most American, homespun, warm ease about him," Lumet said. He also directed original plays for Playhouse 90, Kraft Television Theatre and Studio One, filming around 200 episodes, which established him as "one of the most prolific and respected directors in the business," according to Turner Classic Movies. His ability to work quickly while shooting carried over to his film career. Because the quality of many of the television dramas was so impressive, several of them were later adapted as motion pictures.
  • 1949
    Age 24
    Lumet was married four times; the first three marriages ended in divorce. He was married to actress Rita Gam from 1949–55; to socialite Gloria Vanderbilt from 1956–63; to Gail Jones (daughter of Lena Horne) from 1963–78, and to Mary Gimbel from 1980 until his death.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1939
    Age 14
    In 1939, World War II interrupted his early acting career, and he spent three years with the U.S. Army.
    More Details Hide Details After returning from World War II service (1942–1946) as a radar repairman stationed in India and Burma, he became involved with the Actors Studio, and then formed his own theater workshop. He organized an Off-Broadway group and became its director, and continued directing in summer stock theatre, while teaching acting at the High School of Performing Arts. He was the senior drama coach at the new 46th St. (Landmark) building of "Performing Arts' ("Fame"). The 25-year-old Lumet directed the drama department in a production of The Young and Fair.
    In 1939 he made his only feature-length film appearance, at age 15, in One Third of a Nation.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1935
    Age 10
    In 1935, aged 11, he appeared in a Henry Lynn short film, Papirossen (meaning "Cigarettes" in Yiddish), co-produced by radio star Herman Yablokoff.
    More Details Hide Details The film was shown in a theatrical play with the same title, based on a hit song, "Papirosn". The play and short film appeared in the Bronx McKinley Square Theatre.
    As a child he also appeared in many Broadway plays, including 1935's Dead End and Kurt Weill's The Eternal Road.
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  • 1924
    Born
    Born on June 25, 1924.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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