Sidney Smith
Royal Navy admiral
Sidney Smith
Admiral Sir William Sidney Smith, KCB, GCTE, FRS was a British naval officer. Serving in the American and French revolutionary wars, he later rose to the rank of admiral. Napoleon Bonaparte, reminiscing later in his life, said of him: "That man made me miss my destiny".
Biography
Sidney Smith's personal information overview.
{{personal_detail.supertitle}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
Photo Albums
Popular photos of Sidney Smith
Relationships
View family, career and love interests for Sidney Smith
Show More Show Less
News
News abour Sidney Smith from around the web
UN aims to fight cancer, diabetes, heart, lung diseases - Detroit Free Press
Google News - over 5 years
"The timing is difficult with the economy the way it is, but it should not prevent us from setting goals," said Dr. Sidney Smith, who heads the World Heart Federation. "Many of the things we're proposing cost very little" and some, such as smoking
Article Link:
Google News article
Non-Communicable Diseases - UN Dispatch
Google News - over 5 years
“The timing is difficult with the economy the way it is, but it should not prevent us from setting goals,” said Dr. Sidney Smith, who heads the World Heart Federation, an umbrella group of more than 200 organizations focused on heart disease
Article Link:
Google News article
LOCAL BRIEFS: Gate City falls to South - TriCities.com
Google News - over 5 years
Piedmont College's Sidney Smith scored with 25 seconds remaining in the second overtime to win over Emory & Henry (2-2) 2-1. After a scoreless first half, E&H's PJ Henson scored in the 53rd minute on a pass from Jacob Exum. Piedmont tied it with 3:19
Article Link:
Google News article
Man on murder attempt charge - Leicester Mercury
Google News - over 5 years
Sidney Smith failed to attend his hearing at Leicester Crown Court on Thursday. He was arrested at his bail address in Cambridgeshire on Thursday afternoon, unaware that he was supposed to be at court. Smith, formerly of Park Avenue, Melton,
Article Link:
Google News article
Comic Book Legends Revealed #331 - Comic Book Resources
Google News - over 5 years
One of his biggest early hits was The Gumps, which cartoonist Sidney Smith developed from a Patterson idea. The Gumps, a domestic comedy about “ordinary” people, was a national smash (in 1922, Smith signed a ten-year, $1 million dollar contract!
Article Link:
Google News article
NHL Rankings: Hextall, Emery, Roy and the 10 Most Flamboyant Goalies in Hockey - Bleacher Report
Google News - over 5 years
Born Lorne John Worsley, the Montreal native was given his nickname by friends after Andy Gump from Sidney Smith's comic strip, The Gumps. The Minnesota North Stars lured the late Worsley out of retirement in 1969 after an outstanding tenure with the
Article Link:
Google News article
Changes aplenty for Wanganui - Wanganui Chronicle
Google News - over 5 years
... Karl Gemmell-Clark, Daniel Harris, Scott Leighton, BJ Sidney/Kelvin Smith, Paul Tikomainaivalu, John Stewart, Ratu Vosaki, Kahu Tamatea. Reserves: Jody Tuhaka, Anaru Poihipi, Jason Tuapawa, Efoti Moimoi, Richard Brown, Sione Tupa, Sidney/Smith
Article Link:
Google News article
Juneau Moose Lodge to celebrate centennial - Kenai Peninsula Online
Google News - over 5 years
“In those days we didn't have all the entertainment and the Moose Club was the entertainment,” Sidney Smith, 77, said. Smith's father Lee H. Smith and his uncle William Altumueller were members when the Juneau chapter began. “Playing cards and just a
Article Link:
Google News article
Weekly fishing report - The News Journal
Google News - over 5 years
Anglers checking in with Sidney Smith at Smith's Bait Shop also are connecting with legal fluke, with the area around Cross Ledge at the top of their “where to” list. Fishermen targeting flounder from shore are reporting a few fish over the 18-inch
Article Link:
Google News article
Jim and the Uncensored Mouse - MousePlanet
Google News - over 5 years
The trend at that time was for all strips, comic and illustrative, to do continuities, following the example of Sidney Smith's big hit with The Gumps. By this time, Ub Iwerks had quit drawing the strip and his inker, Win Smith, was reluctantly both
Article Link:
Google News article
Rachel Maxwell-Hyslop - Telegraph.co.uk
Google News - over 5 years
After bluffing her way through an interview with Sidney Smith, Keeper of Egyptian and Assyrian antiquities at the British Museum (“Of course you can read French, German and Italian fluently?” he asked. “I said 'Yes'”) she became one of the first three
Article Link:
Google News article
We Northerners knew we had bigger brains than southern softies - Daily Mail
Google News - over 5 years
The Reverend Sidney Smith, who moved from his Yorkshire parsonage to become Dean of St Paul's Cathedral in the early 19th century, said: 'Never ask a man if he comes from Yorkshire. If he does, he will tell you. If he does not, why humiliate him?
Article Link:
Google News article
A whole lotta' hoopla Festival provides great fun for a good cause in Dover - Foster's Daily Democrat
Google News - over 5 years
Other members of the winning team were Chris Bolduc of Sanford, Maine, Peter Foley of Wells, Maine, a junior at Babson College, and Sidney Smith of New York City, NY With music lilting throughout the area, while standing outside the
Article Link:
Google News article
Walking track could get a new lease on life - Daily Comet
Google News - over 5 years
Recreation District 11 is responsible for the half-mile track and does not have the money for repairs, District Chairman Sidney Smith said. The track has numerous cracks and has been deemed unsafe for walkers and runners. “Most of the money allocated
Article Link:
Google News article
Cholesterol Drugs May Cut Risk of Clots
NYTimes - almost 8 years
New results from a large study suggest that the drugs known as statins may have a benefit beyond lowering cholesterol: reducing the risk of developing blood clots in the veins. The study, published on the Web site of The New England Journal of Medicine and presented Sunday at an American College of Cardiology convention, found that relatively
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Cholesterol Drugs May Reduce Risk of Clots
NYTimes - almost 8 years
New results from a large study suggest that the drugs known as statins may have a benefit beyond lowering cholesterol: reducing the risk of developing blood clots in the veins. The study, published on the Web site of The New England Journal of Medicine and presented Sunday at an American College of Cardiology convention, found that relatively
Article Link:
NYTimes article
SECOND OPINION; From a Prominent Death, Some Painful Truths
NYTimes - over 8 years
Apart from its sadness, Tim Russert's death this month at 58 was deeply unsettling to many people who, like him, had been earnestly following their doctors' advice on drugs, diet and exercise in hopes of avoiding a heart attack. Mr. Russert, the moderator of ''Meet the Press'' on NBC News, took blood pressure and cholesterol pills and aspirin, rode
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Freedom at Gunpoint
NYTimes - about 9 years
NAPOLEON'S EGYPT Invading the Middle East. By Juan Cole. Illustrated. 279 pp. Palgrave Macmillan. $24.95. In early 1798 the Directory, the oligarchy that was ruling revolutionary France, ordered its top general, Napoleon Bonaparte, to plan the invasion of England. Instead, Napoleon organized and carried out the invasion of Egypt, which became the
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Sidney Smith
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1840
    Age 75
    He died on 26 May 1840 following a stroke.
    More Details Hide Details
  • FIFTIES
  • 1815
    Age 50
    In March 1815, Napoleon escaped from Elba and gathering his veteran troops marched on Paris where he was reinstated as Emperor of the French.
    More Details Hide Details Smith travelled back to England but had only reached Brussels by June. Hearing the gunfire of a great battle, he rode out of Brussels and went to meet the Duke of Wellington. Smith found him late in the day when he had just won the Battle of Waterloo. Smith started making arrangements for the collecting and treatment of the many wounded soldiers on both sides. He was then asked to take the surrender of the French garrisons at Arras and Amiens and to ensure that the Allied armies could enter Paris without a fight and that it would be safe for King Louis XVIII to return to his capital. For these and other services, he was finally awarded a British knighthood, the KCB, so he was not just "the Swedish Knight" any more. Smith had managed to run up significant debts through his diplomatic expenses, which the British government proved to be very slow in reimbursing. He also lived high lifestyle and his efforts to mobilise opinion against the slave trade had cost a good deal of money. In Britain, at that time debtors were often imprisoned until their debts were paid, so Smith moved his family to France, settling in Paris. Eventually the government did reimburse his expenditures and increased his pension, allowing him to live in some style. Despite frequent attempts to obtain a seagoing position, he was never to hold a command again.
  • FORTIES
  • 1812
    Age 47
    In July 1812, Smith again sailed for the Mediterranean aboard his new flagship, the 74-gun Tremendous.
    More Details Hide Details He was appointed as second in command to Vice Admiral Sir Edward Pellew. His task was to blockade Toulon and he transferred his flag to the larger Hibernia, a 110-gun first-rate. Blockade duty was tedious, as the French showed no inclination to come out of port and confront the British. Early in 1814, the Allies entered Paris and Napoleon abdicated. He was exiled to the island of Elba. With the coming of peace and the defeat of Napoleon, Smith returned to England. Smith then took up the anti-slavery cause. The Barbary pirates had operated for centuries out of a number of North African ports. They had enslaved captured sailors and even made raids to kidnap people from European coasts, including England and Ireland. Smith attended the Congress of Vienna to campaign for funds and military action to end the practice of slave taking.
  • 1811
    Age 46
    In June 1811 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1810
    Age 45
    Later that year in October 1810, he married Caroline Rumbold, the widow of a diplomat, Sir George Rumbold, with whom Smith had worked.
    More Details Hide Details Upon safe arrival to Brazil escorting the Portuguese Royal Family, Admiral Smith was awarded by the Prince-Regent John, the Grand Cross of the newly restored Order of the Tower and Sword.
  • 1809
    Age 44
    He was involved in planning an attack on the Spanish colonies in South America, in combination with the Portuguese, contrary to his orders, but he was recalled to Britain in 1809 before any of the plans could be carried out.
    More Details Hide Details He received much popular acclaim for his actions and was treated as a hero, but the government continued to be suspicious of him, and he was not given any official honours. Smith was promoted to Vice Admiral on 31 July 1810. In the Royal Navy of the time, promotion was automatic and based on seniority, not a specific reward for good service.
  • 1807
    Age 42
    In November 1807, Smith was appointed to command an expedition to Lisbon, either to assist the Portuguese in resisting the attack or to destroy the Portuguese fleet and blockade the harbour at Lisbon should that be unsuccessful.
    More Details Hide Details Smith arranged for the Portuguese fleet to sail for Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, at that time a Portuguese colony.
  • 1806
    Age 41
    On 4 July 1806, they defeated a larger French force at the Battle of Maida.
    More Details Hide Details Once again, Smith's inability to avoid offending his superiors caused him to be replaced as commander of the land forces despite his success. He was replaced by Sir John Moore, one of Britain's most able soldiers. Moore abandoned Smith's plan and resorted to making the island of Sicily a strong British base in the Mediterranean. Smith was sent to join Admiral Sir John Thomas Duckworth's expedition to Constantinople in February 1807. This was intended to forestall the French from making an alliance with the Turks to allow free passage of their army to Egypt. Despite Smith's great experience in Turkish waters, his knowledge of the Turkish court, and his personal popularity with the Turks, he was kept in a subordinate role. Even when Duckworth eventually did ask for his advice, it was not heeded. Duckworth, instead of allowing Smith to negotiate with the Turks, which the French ambassador later said would have been the end of the French overtures, retreated back through the Dardanelles under heavy Turkish fire. Although this was a defeat, the withdrawal under fire was played up as a heroic feat. In the summer of 1807, Duckworth and Smith were recalled to England.
  • 1805
    Age 40
    In November 1805, Smith was promoted to Rear Admiral, he was again sent to the Mediterranean under the command of Collingwood, who had become the commander-in-chief following Nelson's death.
    More Details Hide Details Collingwood sent him to assist King Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies to regain his capital of Naples from Napoleon's brother King Joseph, who had been given the Kingdom of Naples. Smith planned a campaign using Calabrian irregular troops with a force of 5,000 British officers and men to march north on Naples.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1804
    Age 39
    Smith was interested in new and unusual methods of warfare. In 1804 and 1805, he worked with the American inventor Robert Fulton on his plans to develop torpedoes and mines to destroy the French invasion fleet gathering off the French and Belgian coasts.
    More Details Hide Details However, an attempt to use the new weapons combined with Congreve rockets in an attack on Boulogne was foiled by bad weather and the French gunboats that came out to threaten the attackers. Despite this setback, suggestions were made that the rockets, mines and torpedoes be used against the Combined French and Spanish Fleet in Cádiz. This was not necessary as the combined fleet sailed to defeat at the Battle of Trafalgar in October 1805.
  • 1801
    Age 36
    On his return to England in 1801, Smith received some honours and a pension of £1,000 for his services, but he was overshadowed again by Nelson who was being acclaimed as the victor of the Battle of Copenhagen. During the brief Peace of Amiens, Smith was elected Member of Parliament for Rochester in Kent in the election held in 1802.
    More Details Hide Details There is strong evidence that he had an affair with Princess Caroline of Brunswick, the estranged wife of the Prince of Wales. Although she became pregnant, she was notorious for having a number of other lovers at the same time, such as George Canning and Thomas Lawrence, so it is unlikely the child was Smith's. With the resumption of war with France in 1803, Smith was employed in the southern North Sea off the coast between Ostend and Flushing part of the forces gathered to prevent Napoleon's threatened invasion.
  • 1796
    Age 31
    He was held in Paris for two years, despite a number of efforts to exchange him and frequent contacts with both French Royalists and British agents. Notably Captain Jacques Bergeret, captured in April 1796 with the frigate Virginie, was sent from England to Paris to negotiate his own exchange; when the Directoire refused, he returned to London.
    More Details Hide Details The French authorities threatened several times to try Smith for arson, but never followed up the threats. Eventually in 1798 the Royalists, who pretended to be taking him to another prison, helped Smith and Wright to escape. The royalists brought the two Englishmen to Le Havre, where they boarded an open fishing boat and were picked up on 5 May by on patrol in the English Channel, arriving in London on 8 May 1798. Bergeret was then released, the British government considering the prisoner exchange as completed. Following Nelson's overwhelming victory at the Battle of the Nile, Smith was sent to the Mediterranean as captain of, a captured 80-gun French ship of the line which had been brought into the Royal Navy. It was not a purely naval appointment, although he was ordered to place himself under the command of Lord St Vincent, the commander-in-chief of the Mediterranean. St Vincent gave him orders as Commodore with permission to take British ships under his command as required in the Levant. He also carried a military and diplomatic mission to Istanbul where his brother was now a Minister Plenipotentiary to the Sublime Porte. The mission's task was to strengthen Turkish opposition to Napoleon and to assist the Turks in destroying the French army stranded in Egypt. This dual appointment caused Nelson, who was the senior officer under St Vincent in the Mediterranean, to resent Smith's apparent superseding of his authority in the Levant.
    Smith specialised in inshore operations, and on 19 April 1796, he and his secretary John Wesley Wright were captured while attempting to cut out a French ship in Le Havre.
    More Details Hide Details Smith had taken the ship's boats into the harbour, but the wind died as they attempted to leave the harbour, and the French were able to recapture the ship with Smith and Wright aboard. Instead of being exchanged, as was the custom, Smith and Wright were taken to the Temple prison in Paris where Smith was to be charged with arson for his burning of the fleet at Toulon. As Smith had been on half pay at the time, the French considered that he was not an official combatant.
  • 1795
    Age 30
    On his return to London, Smith was given command of the fifth-rate HMS Diamond and in 1795 joined the Western Frigate Squadron under Sir John Borlase Warren.
    More Details Hide Details This squadron consisted of some of the most skillful and daring captains including Sir Edward Pellew. Smith fitted the pattern and on one occasion took his ship almost into the port of Brest to observe the French fleet. In July 1795, Captain Smith, commanding the western frigate squadron in HMS Diamond, occupied the Îles Saint-Marcouf off the coast of Normandy. He sacrificed two of his gun vessels, and, to provide materials and manpower for fortifying the islands and setting a temporary naval garrison. Further defences were constructed by Royal Engineers, and Royal Marines and Royal Artillery detachments were established. The islands served as a forward base for the blockade of Le Havre, a launching point for intercepting coastal shipping, and as a transit point for French émigrés, and were held by the Navy for nearly seven years.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1793
    Age 28
    By Smith's arrival in December 1793, the Revolutionary forces, including a colonel of artillery, Napoleon Bonaparte, had surrounded the port and were attacking it.
    More Details Hide Details The British and their allies had insufficient soldiers to mount an effective defence and so the port was evacuated. Smith, serving as a volunteer with no command, was given the task of burning as many French ships and stores as possible before the harbour could be captured. Despite his efforts, lack of support from the Spanish forces sent to help him left more than half of the French ships to be captured undamaged. Although Smith had destroyed more French ships than had the most successful fleet action to that date, Nelson and Collingwood, among others, blamed him for this failure to destroy all of the French fleet.
  • 1790
    Age 25
    In 1790, he applied for permission to serve in the Royal Swedish Navy in the war between Sweden and Russia.
    More Details Hide Details King Gustav III appointed him to command the light squadron and to be his principal naval adviser. Smith led his forces in clearing the Bay of Viborg of the Russian fleet, known as the Battle of Svensksund (Finnish: Ruotsinsalmi, Russian: Rochensalm). The Russians lost sixty-four ships and over a thousand men killed. The Swedes lost four ships and had few casualties. For this, Smith was knighted by the king with the Swedish Svärdsorden (Order of the Sword). Smith used this title, with King George III's permission, but was mocked by fellow British officers as "the Swedish knight". There were a number of British officers, on half pay like Smith, who had enlisted and fought with the Russian fleet and six had been killed in this action. As a result, Smith earned the enmity of many British naval officers for his Swedish service.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1783
    Age 18
    He was soon promoted to captain a larger frigate, but following the peace of Versailles in 1783, he was put ashore on half pay.
    More Details Hide Details During the peace, Smith chose to travel to France and first became involved with intelligence matters while observing the construction of the new naval port at Cherbourg. He also traveled in Spain and Morocco which were also potential enemies.
  • 1781
    Age 16
    He distinguished himself under Admiral Thomas Graves at the Battle of the Chesapeake in 1781 and under Admiral George Rodney at the Battle of the Saintes and in consequence was given his first command, the sloop Fury.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1780
    Age 15
    For his bravery under Rodney in the action near Cape St Vincent in January 1780, Sidney Smith was, on 25 September, appointed lieutenant of the 74-gun third-rate Alcide, despite being under the required age of nineteen.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1777
    Age 12
    He joined the Royal Navy in 1777 and fought in the American Revolutionary War, where he saw action in 1778 against the American frigate Raleigh.
    More Details Hide Details
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1764
    Born
    Born on June 21, 1764.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
All data offered is derived from public sources. Spokeo does not verify or evaluate each piece of data, and makes no warranties or guarantees about any of the information offered. Spokeo does not possess or have access to secure or private financial information. Spokeo is not a consumer reporting agency and does not offer consumer reports. None of the information offered by Spokeo is to be considered for purposes of determining any entity or person's eligibility for credit, insurance, employment, housing, or for any other purposes covered under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)