Stanford White
Architect
Stanford White
Stanford White was an American architect and partner in the architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White, the frontrunner among Beaux-Arts firms. He designed a long series of houses for the rich and the very rich, and various public, institutional, and religious buildings, some of which can be found to this day in places like Sea Gate, Brooklyn. His design principles embodied the "American Renaissance".
Biography
Stanford White's personal information overview.
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DOT's Four-Legged Friends: City Installs Horse Lanes on Prospect Park - New York Observer
Google News - over 5 years
In there is no mention of the cars that have dominated the stretch almost since it opened in 1889, horns and car exhaust blowing past the work of some of the city's greatest designers: Stanford White and Olmstead and Vaux. Just because DOT did outreach
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Old papers, documents tell engaging tale of two Alaskans - Anchorage Daily News
Google News - over 5 years
The president -- Teddy Roosevelt -- was frequently on the front page as was socialite Harry Thaw who shot and killed architect Stanford White in New York during a dispute over a woman. Radical labor leader Big Bill Haywood was on the front page too
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Kim Kardashian and Kris Humphries make their way back to NYC from honeymoon ... - New York Daily News
Google News - over 5 years
He'll have some help from the late Stanford White, who designed the striking space — a former Bowery Savings Bank — in 1839. J'accuse! The chairman of the Italic Institute of America is not happy with "Law & Order: SVU" producers' decision to depict
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Sleepy Hollow CC has many reasons to celebrate - The Journal News | LoHud.com
Google News - over 5 years
The campus sits on a picturesque shelf above the Hudson River, and is anchored by a former 75-room manor that was designed by noted architect Stanford White. You name the amenity, it's here — stables, tennis courts, pool, fitness center
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Smithtown, A History: St. James Episcopal Church - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
According to a church hand-out, three of the stained glass windows were designed by American architect Stanford White, a son-in-law of the judge, and fabricated by the celebrated John LaFarge. The Tree of Life window outside the sanctuary is dedicated
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Back in the Day - Aug. 1, 2001: Rhinesmith building told of Wanaque's past - NorthJersey.com
Google News - over 5 years
The school – possibly designed by Stanford White, a leading architect of the era who suffered an early death at the hands of a wronged suitor, immortalized in the movie 'The Girl on the Red Velvet Swing' – stood out in the area for both its size and
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Good morning, Buffalo - Buffalo News
Google News - over 5 years
The neighborhood, built by famed 19th-century architect Stanford White, drew crowds from the Pan-American Exposition in 1901 because of its underground utility lines, wastewater-treatment plant and aesthetic design. Donations of at least $5 ensure a
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10 Real Places From Scifi Adventure Tale 'The Astounding, the Amazing, and the ... - Geeks of Doom
Google News - over 5 years
This building was designed by the great gilded age architect, Stanford White. Walter Gibson, magician, and creator of The Shadow (and Astounding cast member) grew up in the biggest house in this neighborhood. Biggest, by far!
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Media portrayals of Mormonism far better than a century ago - Deseret News
Google News - over 5 years
Included among his reporting were stories about New York's corrupt Tammany Hall political machine and several articles about the original “Trial of the Century,” the celebrated murder of architect Stanford White by a jealous lover Harry Thaw in a
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New York's age of elegance returns with the Chatwal hotel - The Guardian
Google News - over 5 years
Ah yes, Stanford White. A leading figure in America's beaux arts scene, White designed mansions for New York's rich and famous, not to mention city landmarks such as the Washington Square arch and the second Madison Square garden
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The Sidekick in the Spotlight - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
972 is the more flamboyant, both houses were designed by Stanford White. By CHRISTOPHER GRAY THEY have a family resemblance, but the 1907 Cook house, at 973 Fifth Avenue, takes a back seat to the ebullient Whitney residence, next door at 972
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Matteawan State Hospital for the Criminally Insane opened in 1892 - Poughkeepsie Journal
Google News - over 5 years
... including New York City's mad bomber George Metesky, artist-sculptor and admitted multiple-murderer Robert Irwin and Harry K. Thaw, a millionaire who in 1906 shot and killed architect Stanford White in a jealous rage at Madison Square Garden
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On History: Castle built in 1890s to be 'Princeton of the West` - Broomfield Enterprise
Google News - over 5 years
Its designers were architects EB Gregory and Stanford White, who later became the murder victim of Harry Thaw in the infamous "Girl in the Red Velvet Swing" case. White, who came onto the project after Gregory left, had the idea to build the castle
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How the Robber Barons Railroaded America - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
A distinguished historian of the West who teaches at Stanford, White draws some of his most damning evidence from the private papers of the corporate moguls themselves. Away from their publicists, they come across as men whose characters were as flawed
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Estate that hosted Clinton wedding in for sale - Seattle Post Intelligencer
Google News - over 5 years
... five bathrooms, a marble indoor pool and a clay indoor tennis court on 50-plus acres along the Hudson River in scenic Rhinebeck, 90 miles north of New York City. The building was designed by renowned architect Stanford White for John Jacob Astor IV
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Memories of a colossal, national, overly covered trial - Athens NEWS
Google News - over 5 years
Every few years there's a brand new "trial of the century," going right back to the first decade of the last century, when Harry Thaw shot the architect Stanford White to death on the roof at the old Madison Square Garden. White had been a little too
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In Casey Anthony case, we're found guilty - Korea Times
Google News - over 5 years
He was the son of an industrial magnate, who in 1906 murdered the famous architect Stanford White at Madison Square Garden because Thaw's wife, the chorus girl Evelyn Nesbit, said White had debauched her. Thaw had two "trials of the century" ― the
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Stanford White
    OTHER
  • 1906
    Nineteen-year-old Lawrence Grant White was guilt ridden after his father was slain, blaming himself for his death. “If only he had gone Philadelphia!” he lamented. Years later, he would write bitterly, "On the night of June 25th, 1906, while attending a performance at Madison Square Garden, Stanford White was shot from behind by a crazed profligate whose great wealth was used to besmirch his victim's memory during the series of notorious trials that ensued."
    More Details Hide Details White was buried in St. James, New York. As early as the morning following the murder, news coverage became both chaotic and single-minded, and it ground forward with unrelenting momentum. William Randolph Hearst's newspapers played up the murder, and the associated legal proceedings became known as the "Trial of the Century". The rampant interest in the White murder and its key players was used by both the defense and prosecution in Thaw’s murder trial to feed malleable reporters any "scoops" that would give their respective sides an advantage in the public forum. Any person, place or event, no matter how peripheral to White's murder, was seized on by reporters and hyped as newsworthy copy. Facts were thin, but sensationalist reportage was plentiful in this, the heyday of tabloid journalism. The hard-boiled male reporters were bolstered by a contingent of female counterparts, christened "Sob Sisters", also known as the "Pity Patrol". Their stock in trade was the human-interest piece, heavy on sentimental tropes and melodrama, crafted to pull on the emotions and punch them up to fever pitch.
    White’s presence at the roof garden theatre of Madison Square Garden on the night of June 25, 1906 had been an impromptu decision.
    More Details Hide Details White had originally planned to be in Philadelphia on business; he postponed the trip when his son, Lawrence, made an unexpected visit to New York. Accompanied by New York society figure James Clinch Smith, they dined at Martin's, near the theatre, where Harry Kendall Thaw and his wife Evelyn Nesbit also dined. Thaw apparently saw White there. That evening’s theatrical presentation was the premiere performance of Mam'zelle Champagne. During the show’s finale, "I Could Love A Million Girls", Thaw approached White, produced a pistol, standing some two feet from his target, said, "You've ruined my wife", and fired three shots at White, hitting him twice in the face and once in his upper left shoulder, killing him instantly. Part of White’s face was torn away, and the rest of his features were unrecognizable, blackened by gunpowder. The crowd's initial reaction was one of good cheer, as elaborate party tricks among the upper echelon of New York society were common at the time. However, when it became apparent that White was dead, hysteria ensued.
  • 1902
    In 1902, he designed the Benjamin Walworth Arnold House and Carriage House in Albany, New York, and he helped to develop Nikola Tesla's Wardenclyffe Tower, his last design.
    More Details Hide Details Just as his Washington Square Arch still stands (in Washington Square Park), so do many of White's clubhouses, which were focal points of New York society: the Century, Colony, Harmonie, Lambs, Metropolitan, and Players clubs. However, his clubhouse for the Atlantic Yacht Club, built in 1894 overlooking Gravesend Bay, burned down in 1934. Sons of society families also resided in White's St. Anthony Hall Chapter House at Williams College, now occupied by college offices. In the division of projects within the firm, the sociable and gregarious White landed the majority of commissions for private houses. His fluent draftsmanship was highly convincing to clients who might not get much visceral understanding from a floorplan, and his intuition and facility caught the mood. White's Long Island houses have survived well, despite the loss of Harbor Hill in 1947, originally set on in Roslyn. White's Long Island houses are of three types, depending on their locations: Gold Coast chateaux; neo-Colonial structures, especially those in the neighborhood of his own house at "Box Hill" in Smithtown, New York (White's wife was a Smith); and the South Fork houses from Southampton to Montauk Point. He also designed the Kate Annette Wetherill Estate in 1895.
  • 1898
    He also designed Cocke, Rouss, and Old Cabell halls at the University of Virginia, and rebuilt The Rotunda (University of Virginia) in 1898, three years after it had burned down (his re-creation was later to Thomas Jefferson's original design for the United States Bicentennial in 1976).
    More Details Hide Details Additionally, he designed the Blair Mansion at 7711 Eastern Ave. in Silver Spring, Maryland (1880), now being used as a restaurant. He was responsible for designing the Boston Public Library and the Boston Hotel Buckminster, both still standing today.
  • 1895
    He also designed the Cosmopolitan Building, a three-story Neo-classical Revival building topped by three small domes, in Irvington, New York, built in 1895 as the headquarters of Cosmopolitan Magazine.
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  • 1889
    In 1889, White designed the triumphal arch at Washington Square, which, according to White's great-grandson, architect Samuel G. White, is the structure White should be best remembered for.
    More Details Hide Details White was the director of the Washington Centennial celebration and created a temporary triumphal arch which was so popular, money was raised to construct a permanent version. Elsewhere in New York City, White designed the Villard Houses (1884), the second Madison Square Garden (1890; demolished in 1925), the Cable Building - the cable car power station at 611 Broadway - (1893), the New York Herald Building (1894; demolished), the First Bowery Savings Bank, at the intersection of the Bowery and Grand Street (1894), Judson Memorial Church on Washington Square, the Century Club and Madison Square Presbyterian Church, as well as the Gould Memorial Library (1903), originally for New York University, now on the campus of Bronx Community College and the location of the Hall of Fame for Great Americans. Outside of New York City, White designed the First Methodist Episcopal Church in Baltimore, Maryland (1887), now Lovely Lane United Methodist Church.
  • 1887
    A son, Lawrence Grant White, was born in 1887.
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  • 1884
    In 1884, White married 22-year-old Bessie Springs Smith.
    More Details Hide Details His new wife hailed from a socially prominent Long Island family; her ancestors were early settlers of the area, and Smithtown, New York was named for them. Their estate, Box Hill, was not only a home, but also a showplace illustrating the luxe design aesthetic White offered prospective wealthy clients.
  • 1878
    In 1878, White embarked for a year and a half in Europe, and when he returned to New York in September 1879, he joined Charles Follen McKim and William Rutherford Mead to form McKim, Mead and White.
    More Details Hide Details As part of the partnership, all commissions designed by the architects were identified as being the work of the collective firm, not any individual architect.
  • 1853
    Born on November 9, 1853.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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