Steve Davis
snooker player
Steve Davis
Steve Davis, OBE is an English professional snooker player. He has won more professional titles in the sport than any other player, including six World Championships during the 1980s, when he was the world number one for seven years and became the sport's first millionaire. He has won 28 ranking events in total, second only to Stephen Hendry. Davis' achievements also include three Masters and a record six UK Championship titles.
Biography
Steve Davis's personal information overview.
{{personal_detail.supertitle}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
{{personal_detail.title}}
Relationships
View family, career and love interests for Steve Davis
News
News abour Steve Davis from around the web
Twenty-Five Great Jazz Soprano Saxophone Performances
Huffington Post - 12 days
The soprano Saxophone has been the stepchild to its large brothers, the Alto and Tenor saxophones in jazz music. Despite a lineage that dates to the early twenties, the soprano was not widely used as a solo instrument in many early jazz recordings, with most soloists preferring the clarinet for its warmer, richer sound. The soprano is typically found as a straight barreled instrument although small curved horns that look like baby alto saxophones with a straighter crook are also in use. The saxophone was invented by Adolphe Sax in 1846. Modern soprano instruments have a range of between Ab3 to E6 pitched one octave higher than the tenor, but some skilled players can play in the altissimo register allowing them to play even higher. Sidney Bechet photo credit unknown It has been said that the great Sidney Bechet, a New Orleans born classically trained musician, discovered a quality soprano saxophone while on tour in England with Marion Cook's Southern Syncopated Orchestra, s ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
WANTED: Idealistic students to save millions of lives
Huffington Post - 17 days
Successfully addressing opportunity gaps requires great partners. One of those partners for the Siemens Foundation is PATH, the Seattle-based global health organization. Together, we're working to ensure that tomorrow's innovators have an opportunity to apply their innovative spirit in ways that truly make a difference in the world. In the spirit of partnership, I invited Steve Davis, CEO of PATH, to co-author the following: Conventional wisdom about STEM education in the U.S. goes something like this: We need to do a better job teaching our students math and science so they can fill a mind-boggling number of high-paying jobs in the tech sector, which are fueling our economy. That's certainly part of the story. But if we view STEM education primarily as a fast track to a comfortable, high-paying job, we're selling our students short--because STEM education can also lead to a career that serves humanity's highest needs. If we stoke their idealism along with their academic pas ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Reaching Your Potential Through Partnerships: Lessons Learned from SOCAP 2016
Huffington Post - 5 months
“We believe that today’s problems require more collaborative approaches that break down silos, recruit new talent and foster greater cooperation.” - Jason Rissman, OpenIDEO Managing Director at IDEO The meeting of the minds at #SOCAP16 was pretty incredible. Plenaries included leaders from at Acumen, IDEO, Stanford, PayPal, Aspen Network of Development Entrepreneurs and many, many, MANY more. Thousands of impact-driven, business minded professionals assembled to discuss ways to create capital markets that were more inclusive and more responsible. “In order to unlock capital for impact entrepreneurs around the world it will take a collective effort at both the local and global level” - Jack Knellinger, Principal & Co-Founder of the impact fund accelerator, Capria But the essence of SOCAP is not about what happens on-stage. SOCAP is the world’s largest petri dish for impact-driven partnership building. And, as we highlighted earlier in this column, it’s partnership – and ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Why This CEO Believes Polio Will Be Eradicated Worldwide In 5 Years
Huffington Post - about 1 year
(function(){var src_url="https://spshared.5min.com/Scripts/PlayerSeed.js?playList=519430877&height=&width=100&sid=577&origin=undefined&videoGroupID=155847&relatedNumOfResults=100&responsive=true&ratio=wide&align=center&relatedMode=2&relatedBottomHeight=60&companionPos=&hasCompanion=false&autoStart=false&colorPallet=%23FFEB00&videoControlDisplayColor=%23191919&shuffle=0&isAP=1&pgType=cmsPlugin&pgTypeId=addToPost-top&onVideoDataLoaded=track5min.DL&onTimeUpdate=track5min.TC&onVideoDataLoaded=HPTrack.Vid.DL&onTimeUpdate=HPTrack.Vid.TC";if (typeof(commercial_video) == "object") {src_url += "&siteSection="+commercial_video.site_and_category;if (commercial_video.package) {src_url += "&sponsorship="+commercial_video.package;}}var script = document.createElement("script");script.src = src_url;script.async = true;var placeholder = document.querySelector(".js-fivemin-script") ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Police: Man dressed as Santa stabs Denver-area bus passenger
LATimes - about 1 year
Police in suburban Denver are looking for a man dressed in a Santa suit who stabbed another passenger on a bus. Lakewood police spokesman Steve Davis says the man dressed as Santa Claus got into a fight with a 31-year-old man and stabbed him before getting off the bus around 1 a.m. Thursday. The...
Article Link:
LATimes article
Police: Man dressed as Santa stabs Denver-area bus passenger
LATimes - about 1 year
Police in suburban Denver are looking for a man dressed in a Santa suit who stabbed another passenger on a bus. Lakewood police spokesman Steve Davis says the man dressed as Santa Claus got into a fight with a 31-year-old man and stabbed him before getting off the bus around 1 a.m. Thursday. The...
Article Link:
LATimes article
Police: Man dressed as Santa stabs Denver-area bus passenger
LATimes - about 1 year
Police in suburban Denver are looking for a man dressed in a Santa suit who stabbed another passenger on a bus. Lakewood police spokesman Steve Davis says the man dressed as Santa Claus got into a fight with a 31-year-old man and stabbed him before getting off the bus around 1 a.m. Thursday. The...
Article Link:
LATimes article
Police: Man dressed as Santa stabs Denver-area bus passenger
LATimes - about 1 year
Police in suburban Denver are looking for a man dressed in a Santa suit who stabbed another passenger on a bus. Lakewood police spokesman Steve Davis says the man dressed as Santa Claus got into a fight with a 31-year-old man and stabbed him before getting off the bus around 1 a.m. Thursday. The...
Article Link:
LATimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Steve Davis
    FIFTIES
  • 2016
    Age 58
    His set at Bloc Festival in 2016 was critically acclaimed for his eclectic choice of underground electronic music.
    More Details Hide Details
    On 17 April 2016, two years after losing his place on the main tour and therefore his professional status, Davis announced his retirement from professional snooker during a live BBC broadcast, citing the recent death of his father Bill as the main reason.
    More Details Hide Details
    He entered the 2016 World Championship qualifiers but was beaten by Fergal O'Brien.
    More Details Hide Details
    On 17 April 2016, after failing to qualify for the 2016 World Snooker Championship, Davis announced his retirement from professional play.
    More Details Hide Details Outside snooker, Davis has competed in pool tournaments, notably playing on Team Europe at the Mosconi Cup between 1994 and 2004, helping the team win the event in 1995 and 2002. He is also noted for his participation in poker events, having reached the final stages of several televised tournaments. Since 1996 he has been a regular broadcaster with Phoenix FM and an expert in the progressive rock genres of Zeuhl, RIO and the Canterbury scene. A keen amateur chess player, he has co-authored two chess books with grandmaster David Norwood and is a former president of the British Chess Federation. He has also published several books on snooker, as well as three cookbooks. He has appeared on a number of popular British TV shows, including I'm a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here! in 2013. He was made an MBE in 1988 and an OBE in 2001.
    Until his retirement in 2016, Davis combined his ongoing playing career with his role as a television analyst and commentator for the BBC's snooker coverage, alongside being a DJ of electronic music on local radio station Phoenix FM and at the Bloc Weekend music festival.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 2014
    Age 56
    Davis played in the 2014 Champion of Champions event after qualifying through winning the 2013 World Seniors Championship, losing 1–4 to Mark Selby in the group semi-final.
    More Details Hide Details
    Given an invitational tour card to participate in tournaments for the 2014–15 season, Davis made his return to competitive snooker in the Riga Open in August 2014, losing 1–4 to Robert Milkins in the last 64.
    More Details Hide Details He then participated in the Paul Hunter Classic, losing 2–4 to Gary Wilson in the last 128.
    After a defeat by Craig Steadman 8–10 in the second round of the 2014 World Snooker Championship qualification, Davis finished the season outside the top 64 in the money list and dropped off the professional main tour after 36 years.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 2013
    Age 55
    Davis started the 2013/2014 season at number 51, and his first match was in the qualifying stages for the Wuxi Classic, where he faced James Cahill.
    More Details Hide Details After Cahill levelled the match at 2–2, Davis won the next three frames in a row, along with a 131 break in the penultimate frame, to book his place for the main stage of the tournament in Wuxi, where he lost 1–5 against Andrew Higginson in the last 64. Davis then lost at the qualifying stages of the next two ranking events he entered. He lost 2–5 against Higginson at the Shanghai Masters, and 1–4 against Thanawat Thirapongpaiboon at the Indian Open. He than qualified for the International Championship with a 6–2 win against Allan Taylor, but lost at the venue 1–6 against Zhao Xintong in the wildcard round. Davis won his first World Seniors Championship title by defeating Nigel Bond 2–1 in the final.
    He won the World Seniors Championship in 2013.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 2012
    Age 54
    Davis started the 2012/2013 season at number 51, but could not qualify for the first two ranking events, as he lost 3–5 against Kurt Maflin at the Wuxi Classic, and 0–5 against Michael Wild at the Australian Goldfields Open.
    More Details Hide Details Davis took part in the Six-red World Championship, where he finished third in Group E with three wins out of five matches and advanced to the knock-out stage, but lost 1–6 against Mark Davis in the last 32. Davis qualified for the Shanghai Masters by defeating Alfie Burden 5–1 and Andrew Higginson 5–0. There he defeated Zhu Yinghui 5–1 to reach the last 32, but lost 4–5 against Ricky Walden. He, however, could not qualify for the International Championship after losing his first qualifying match 5–6 against Pankaj Advani. Davis then qualified for the final stages of the UK Championship by defeating Advani 6–5 and Jamie Burnett 6–2, but lost 2–6 against Ali Carter, and he also lost his first qualifying match at German Masters 4–5 against Simon Bedford. Davis also participated at the Players Tour Championship, where his best results came at the Kay Suzanne Memorial Trophy and the Scottish Open, where he reached the last 16, but lost 3–4 against John Higgins and 1–4 against Ding Junhui respectively. He finished number 52 on the Order of Merit. Davis then lost at the qualifying stages of the next two ranking events. He lost 4–5 against Chen Zhe at the World Open, and 0–5 against Mark King at the China Open. At the Welsh Open he defeated Kurt Maflin 4–2 to qualify for the venue stage of the event, where he lost 0–4 against Mark Selby.
  • 2011
    Age 53
    In 2011 he was inducted to World Snooker's newly created Hall of Fame along with seven former World Champions.
    More Details Hide Details Davis had a presence perhaps not seen since the days of Joe Davis. His aura was such that stories of opponents booking themselves out of their hotels when they drew him in a match because they knew they would lose are taken as fact and not disputed. His tally of century breaks would no doubt be even more impressive had he not had a habit of steamrolling opponents and racing into a lead, making many breaks of 80 or 90 to clinch a frame and get the next underway rather than taking a risk and going for a century break. Davis had used this tactic against Dennis Taylor in 1985 when he led 8–0 in the World Final and most famously against John Parrott in 1989 when he won 18–3. Davis, who later in his career acquired a reputation for slow play and overt use of tactics rather than break building, was a very different player at his best. His ability to win frames in one visit was perhaps his best attribute, with long potting second to none. Perhaps more importantly, Davis changed the face of Snooker on television. At a time when professional players would drink alcohol and smoke cigarettes during televised matches, Davis would sip from a glass of water. His clean cut, viceless image became, via Stephen Hendry, the blueprint for the modern game.
  • 2010
    Age 52
    After 2010 he reached the final of the World Seniors Championship, but again lost in the final, this time 1–2 against Darren Morgan.
    More Details Hide Details Davis also participated at the Players Tour Championship, where his best results came at the Warsaw Classic, where he reached the semi-finals, but lost 3–4 against Ricky Walden. He finished number 26 on the Order of Merit. He qualified for the UK Championship, by defeating both Ian McCulloch and Andrew Higginson 6–2, but he could not qualify to the German Masters as he lost 1–5 against Robert Milkins and also lost in the first round of the UK Championship 1–6 against Ronnie O'Sullivan. Davis then missed the World Open, as he lost his first qualifying match 1–5 against Ian McCulloch, but reached the last 16 of the Welsh Open with three 4–3 victories, defeating Lucky Vatnani, Ricky Walden and Allister Carter, before losing 0–4 against Shaun Murphy. However, he then did not qualify for either the China Open, nor the World Snooker Championship, losing 1–5 to Rory McLeod and 7–10 to Ben Woollaston respectively.
    Davis started the 2010/2011 season by qualifying to the televised stages of Shanghai Masters, whitewashing Rod Lawler 5–0, but lost in the first round 3–5 against Jamie Cope.
    More Details Hide Details He lost his qualifying matches in the next two tournaments, he lost 1–3 against Peter Ebdon in the last 64 of the World Open and 2–9 against Mark Joyce in the last 48 of the UK Championship. He also participated at the Players Tour Championship, where his best results came at the Paul Hunter Classic, where he reached the quarter-finals, but lost 1–4 against Shaun Murphy. He finished 67 on the Order of Merit. Davis also reached the final of the World Seniors Championship, but lost in the final 1–4 against Jimmy White. He reached the third qualifying round of the German Masters, but was whitewashed by Ryan Day 0–5. Davis lost his first qualifying matches of the next two tournaments. He was beaten by Joe Jogia 3–4 in the Welsh Open and 4–5 by James Wattana in the China Open. He narrowly reached the last qualifying round of the World Championship, by defeating Jack Lisowski 10–9, but lost against Stephen Lee 2–10.
    On 29 April 2010, to mark the 25th anniversary of their black-ball final of 1985, Davis appeared with Dennis Taylor before the beginning of the first semi-final, to stage a humorous re-enactment of their historic final frame.
    More Details Hide Details Taylor entered the arena wearing a pair of comically oversised glasses, while Davis arrived sporting a red wig.
    Davis started 2010 by failing to qualify for the Welsh Open and the China Open, losing 2–5 against Dominic Dale and 3–5 against Mike Dunn respectively in the final qualifying round.
    More Details Hide Details In March he qualified for the World Championship for a record 30th time by defeating Adrian Gunnell 10–4. In the first round Davis defeated Mark King 10–9, becoming, at the age of 52, the oldest player to win a match at the Crucible since Eddie Charlton beat Cliff Thorburn in 1989. In the second round against defending champion John Higgins, a 1–20 favourite, Davis led 6–2 after the first session, 9–7 after the second session, and ultimately won 13–11, a win Clive Everton described as "the greatest upset in the 33 years the Crucible has been hosting the championship." This made him the oldest world quarter-finalist since Charlton in 1983. In the quarter-final match against Australian Neil Robertson, Davis recovered from a 2–12 deficit to force the match into the third session, eventually losing 5–13.
    He reached the quarter-finals of the 2010 World Championship at the age of 52, making him the oldest quarter-finalist since Eddie Charlton in 1983.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 2009
    Age 51
    In the first two tournaments of the 2009/2010 season Davis failed to qualify for the televised stages as he lost 4–5 against Matthew Selt in the Shanghai Masters and 0–5 against Mark Davis in the Grand Prix.
    More Details Hide Details In the next tournament, the UK Championship, he defeated Michael Judge 9–7 to set up a first round match against Hendry, which he lost 6–9.
  • 2008
    Age 50
    He dropped out of the top sixteen a year later, but showed form in the 2008/2009 season by reaching the quarter-finals of both the Shanghai Masters and Grand Prix, the first time he had reached consecutive ranking event quarter-finals since 1996.
    More Details Hide Details At the World Championship Davis lost in the first round 2–10 against Neil Robertson. After the match he again dismissed talk of his retirement.
  • FORTIES
  • 2006
    Age 48
    Davis's performances through the 2006/2007 season, including reaching the UK Championship quarter-finals and the Welsh Open semi-finals, ensured he was still a top 16 player at the age of 50.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 2005
    Age 47
    Davis lives in Brentwood, Essex, and divorced from his wife Judith in 2005 after 15 years of marriage.
    More Details Hide Details They have two sons called Greg (born 1991) and Jack (born 1993). In 2012, Greg Davis entered the Q School, with the aim of winning a place on the professional snooker tour. He was a supporter of the Conservative Party. Steve Davis made the first maximum break in professional competition in 1982.
    At the 2005 UK Championship, held in York, Davis reached his 100th major career final, and made his first appearance in the UK final since 1990.
    More Details Hide Details En route he beat defending champion Stephen Maguire 9–8, a win which included a 145 break; and then Stephen Hendry 9–6 in the semi-finals to reach the final, where he lost 6–10 against Ding Junhui. Before the World Championships Davis brushed off suggestions of retirement, and he reached the second round, where he lost to Murphy.
    In 2005 he reached the quarter finals of the World Championship, losing to eventual winner Shaun Murphy.
    More Details Hide Details
    He reached the final of the 2005 UK Championship at the age of 48 and was still ranked inside the top 16 when he turned 50 during the 2007/2008 season.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 2004
    Age 46
    He was runner-up in the 2004 Welsh Open to O'Sullivan, losing 8–9 after having led 8–5.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 2001
    Age 43
    He was awarded an OBE in 2001, and is currently honorary president of the Snooker Writers' Association.
    More Details Hide Details Davis is a big fan of the French progressive rock band Magma, and even organised a concert in London so he could watch them. Davis is on the board of Leyton Orient football club; he has been a Charlton Athletic fan most of his life.
    After failing to qualify for the World Snooker Championship for the first time in his professional career in 2001, Davis felt that retiring would be the easy thing to do, but as he still liked the challenge of snooker, he continued playing, and regained his place in the top 16 for the 2003/2004 season.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 2000
    Age 42
    After a season which saw Davis reach only one ranking event quarter-final, Davis dropped out of the top 16 for the 2000/2001 season, and failed to qualify for the World Championship for the next two years.
    More Details Hide Details
  • THIRTIES
  • 1997
    Age 39
    Davis's last victory in a major tournament came at the 1997 Masters.
    More Details Hide Details Trailing his opponent Ronnie O'Sullivan 4–8 in the final, he won the next six frames to secure a 10–8 win. During this period, Davis had been clearly struggling with his game, displaying the classic symptoms of a confidence problem in his technique. His cue action, which was once regarded by his peers as the best in the game, was now in tatters, with Davis seemingly unable to settle on a feathering up drill, going from slow and deliberate in some matches to randomly speeding up in others. He also soon brought comments from commentators with regard to his overreliance on safety play, and over thinking his shots. It was clear that Davis had a serious problem and ultimately one he would never recover from. 1989 proved to be his last appearance in a World Final, unthinkable at the time.
  • 1995
    Age 37
    His successful defence of his Welsh Open title in 1995 was to be his last ranking title.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1991
    Age 33
    He reached the semi-finals of the World Championships in 1991 and 1994.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1990
    Age 32
    He has published numerous other books, five relating to snooker: Successful Snooker (1982), Frame and Fortune (1982), Steve Davis: Snooker Champion (1983), Matchroom Snooker (1988) and The Official Matchroom 1990; two relating to chess in 1995 with David Norwood: Steve Davis Plays Chess and Grandmaster Meets Chess Amateur.
    More Details Hide Details He also authored three cookbooks in 1994: Simply Fix – the Steve Davis Interesting Cookbook No 1 – Interesting Things to Do With Meat, Simply Fix – The Steve Davis Interesting Cookbook No 2 – Interesting Things to Make with Poultry, and Simply Fix – the Steve Davis Interesting Cookbook No 3 – Interesting Things to Make Using Vegetables. In 1986 he joined musical duo Chas & Dave and several other snooker stars of the time (under the name "The Matchroom Mob") on the novelty record "Snooker Loopy", which was a Top 10 hit in the United Kingdom. A year the later they released a follow-up single, the "Romford Rap", though this only reached #91 in the UK charts. Since 1996 he has presented a show dedicated to progressive rock and the Canterbury scene on his local radio station, Phoenix FM. In 2013, Davis participated in the thirteenth series of I'm a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here! He finished in eighth place.
    He also won the Irish Masters in 1990, 1991, 1993 and 1994, the Classic and the Asian Open in 1992, the European Open in 1993, and consecutive Welsh Open titles in 1994 and 1995.
    More Details Hide Details
    He was ranked number 2 for the 1990/1991, 1991/1992, 1994/1995 and 1995/1996 seasons.
    More Details Hide Details
    In the 1990 World Championship, Davis was denied an eighth consecutive appearance in the final by Jimmy White, who won their semi-final 16–14.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1989
    Age 31
    Davis was replaced as world number one by Stephen Hendry at the end of the 1989/90 season.
    More Details Hide Details
    After demolishing John Parrott in the 1989 World Final, it seemed obvious that the new decade would see Davis and rising star Stephen Hendry battling for supremacy.
    More Details Hide Details However, the mouthwatering prospect of Davis v Hendry World finals never materialised. As with Ray Reardon and his successor Steve Davis, there was to be no World Final showdown between once and future kings. Instead, Hendry became the new king, with Jimmy White as his main rival.
    This match in particular was regarded as one of his greatest performances, and was cited in the Guinness Book of Snooker as "The greatest display of potting, break building and safety play ever seen" with the further observation "no-one could have lived with Davis the way he played at the Crucible in 1989".
    More Details Hide Details In October he retained the Grand Prix, beating Dean Reynolds 10–0 in the final, the first whitewash in a ranking event final. By the end of the 1980s, Davis was snooker's first millionaire.
    He did not win another major title that season until the 1989 World Championship, where he beat Hendry 16–9 in the semi-finals before going on to complete the heaviest victory in a world final of the modern era with an 18–3 win over John Parrott, his last world championship to date.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1988
    Age 30
    Davis won the first ranking event of the 1988/1989 season with a 12–6 win over White in the International Open; in the same match, he became the first player to make three consecutive century breaks in a major tournament.
    More Details Hide Details In October, Davis won the Grand Prix, beating Alex Higgins 10–6 in the final to hold the World, UK, Masters, Grand Prix, Classic and Irish Masters titles simultaneously. However, his four-year unbeaten run at the UK Championship came to an end in December with a 3–9 semi-final loss to Hendry.
    In 1988 retained the Classic, claimed his second Masters title with a 9–0 final whitewash of Mike Hallett (the only final whitewash in the event's history), won the World Cup with England and won his fourth Irish Masters title.
    More Details Hide Details In the World Championship Davis defeated Hallett 13–1, Tony Drago 13–4 and Thorburn 16–8 en route to the final, where he met Griffiths. Davis established a 5–2 lead after the first session, but Griffiths levelled at 8–8 after the second. On the second day of the match Davis took ten out of thirteen frames to win 18–11 and claim his fifth world title.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1987
    Age 29
    Davis started 1987 by winning the Classic, beating defending champion Jimmy White 13–12.
    More Details Hide Details At the World Championship, he defeated Griffiths 13–5 in the quarter-final, and White 16–11 in the semi-final. In the final he again met Johnson, and established a 14–10 lead after three sessions. Johnson reduced Davis' lead to 14–13, but Davis won four of the next five frames to win the match 18–14 and regain the title. In beating Johnson he became the first player to win the UK Championship, Masters and World Championship in the same year. In December he retained his UK title with a 16–14 final win against White.
    During the 1987/1988 season, he became the first player to complete snooker's Triple Crown by winning the UK Championship, Masters, and World Championship in the same season.
    More Details Hide Details His other accomplishments include winning the World Doubles Championship four times with Tony Meo and winning the World Team Classic/World Cup four times with England. Davis won his last world title in 1989, and captured his last major title when he won the 1997 Masters at the age of 39, but he continued to play snooker at a high level into his 50s.
  • 1986
    Age 28
    At the end of 1986 he beat Neal Foulds 16–7 to retain the UK Championship.
    More Details Hide Details
    At the 1986 World Championship, Davis defeated White 13–5 in the quarter-finals and Thorburn 16–12 in the semi-finals, Davis's opponent in the final was Joe Johnson, who had started the tournament as a 150–1 outsider.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1985
    Age 27
    The result did not affect his position at the top of the world rankings, as he had won the UK Championship, the Grand Prix and the British Open in the 1985/1986 season.
    More Details Hide Details
    In the 1985 UK Championship final Davis trailed 8–13 against Willie Thorne, who missed a blue off the spot which would have given him a 14–8 lead.
    More Details Hide Details Davis won the frame and then seven of the next eight to win 16–14.
    Davis and Taylor met again in the final of the 1985 Grand Prix, but this time Davis won in the deciding frame.
    More Details Hide Details At 10 hours 21 minutes, it remains the longest one-day final in snooker history.
    At the 1985 World Championship, Davis dropped only 23 frames en route to the final, where his opponent was Dennis Taylor.
    More Details Hide Details He looked set for a third consecutive world title after an opening session of near-faultless snooker gave him a 7–0 lead, which he extended to 8–0 in the evening session, but Taylor recovered to trail only 7–9. From 11–11 the pair traded frames before Davis forged ahead to lead 17–15. Taylor won the next two frames to level the match at 17–17 and force a deciding frame. With the scores close, Taylor potted the final colours to leave the black as the winner-takes-all ball. After a series of safety shots and attempts at potting it, Davis over-cut the black, leaving Taylor with a reasonably straightforward pot to secure the championship. The nailbiting finale drew 18.5 million viewers, a record post-midnight audience on British television and a record audience for BBC Two. The finish was voted the ninth greatest sporting moment of all time in a 2002 Channel 4 poll.
    Known for dominating the sport during the 1980s, when he won the World Championship six times and was ranked world number one for seven consecutive seasons, he is remembered particularly for contesting the 1985 World Championship final with Dennis Taylor, the black-ball conclusion of which attracted a record 18.5 million British viewers.
    More Details Hide Details He is a well known public figure and is generally viewed by his peers as one of the greatest players of all time.
  • 1984
    Age 26
    He also regained the UK title in 1984 defeating Higgins 16–8.
    More Details Hide Details
    In 1984, he became the first player to retain his world title at the Crucible Theatre by beating Jimmy White 18–16 in the final.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1983
    Age 25
    Davis lost 16–15 to Higgins in the 1983 UK Championship final, despite having led 7–0 at one point of the match.
    More Details Hide Details
    In 1983 Davis regained the world title with a session to spare in the final, defeating an overwhelmed Thorburn 18–6; Thorburn had seen his previous three matches go to a deciding frame and a late finish.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1982
    Age 24
    Davis's 18-month period of dominance ended at the 1982 World Championship, when he succumbed to the so-called "Crucible Curse", losing 10–1 against Tony Knowles in the first round.
    More Details Hide Details Later that year, he could not win a third consecutive UK title as he lost in the quarter-finals against Griffiths. Following those two setbacks, he won the World Doubles Championship title with partner Tony Meo.
    In 1982, Davis won his first Masters title, defeating Griffiths 9–6 in the final.
    More Details Hide Details
    During this run, in January 1982, Davis made snooker history when he compiled the first televised maximum break at the Classic at the Queen Elizabeth Hall, Oldham, against John Spencer.
    More Details Hide Details Davis won a Lada car for the achievement. Davis subsequently lost 9–8 in the final against Griffiths.
  • 1981
    Age 23
    He won the Classic and then the International Masters and English Professional titles in 1981, and became the bookmakers' favourite to win the 1981 World Championship, despite being seeded only 15.
    More Details Hide Details Davis reached the final by defeating Jimmy White in the first round, Higgins in the second round, Griffiths in the quarter-finals and defending champion Cliff Thorburn in the semi-final. Davis's 18–12 victory over Doug Mountjoy in the final confirmed bookmakers' early predictions, and in celebration his manager Barry Hearn charged across the arena to lift him up in the air. He would go on to reach seven out of the next eight world finals. Peculiarly, Davis's first four world finals were each against a player of a different nationality, something that had not occurred before or has since. He followed up his world title win with a 9–0 final victory over Dennis Taylor in the International Open and then retained the UK Championship with a 9–0 whitewash over White in the semi-finals and a 16–3 win over Griffiths in the final. This began a period of six months in which Davis and Griffiths contested almost all the major tournament finals.
  • 1980
    Age 22
    Davis came to public prominence after his performance at the 1980 World Championship, where he reached the quarter-finals, defeating defending champion Terry Griffiths en route, before losing to Alex Higgins.
    More Details Hide Details Davis won his first major title in the same year – the UK Championship – during which he beat Griffiths 9–0 in the semi-finals and Higgins 16–6 in the final. This began an 18-month period of dominance.
  • 1979
    Age 21
    He made his World Championship debut in 1979, losing 11–13 to Dennis Taylor in the first round.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1978
    Age 20
    Davis turned professional on 17 September 1978 and made his professional television debut on Pot Black, where he played against Fred Davis.
    More Details Hide Details
    One of his last wins as an amateur was against another future professional Tony Meo in the final of the Pontin's Spring Open of 1978.
    More Details Hide Details A year later he successfully defended his title, this time defeating another of his future rivals, Jimmy White, 7–4 in the final.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1976
    Age 18
    Davis won the English Under-19 Billiards Championship in 1976.
    More Details Hide Details
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1957
    Born
    Born on August 22, 1957.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
All data offered is derived from public sources. Spokeo does not verify or evaluate each piece of data, and makes no warranties or guarantees about any of the information offered. Spokeo does not possess or have access to secure or private financial information. Spokeo is not a consumer reporting agency and does not offer consumer reports. None of the information offered by Spokeo is to be considered for purposes of determining any entity or person's eligibility for credit, insurance, employment, housing, or for any other purposes covered under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)