Tadj ol-Molouk
Queen consort of Iran
Tadj ol-Molouk
Tadj ol-Molouk Ayromlou, née Nimtaj Khanum, was the daughter of General Teymur Tadfel Molouk Ayrumlu, and was the queen consort of Reza Shah, founder of the Pahlavi dynasty and Shah of Iran between 1925 and 1941. Her name means Crown of the King in Persian. She was an ethnic Iranian Azeri. The surname Ayromlou is also spelled as "Ayrumlu", "Ayromloo", "Eyrumlu", "Iromloo" due to misspelling during their immigration to other countries.
Biography
Tadj ol-Molouk's personal information overview.
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    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1982
    Age 85
    She died in Acapulco (Mexico) on 10 March 1982 after a lengthy battle with leukemia seven days before her 86th birthday.
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  • 1979
    Age 82
    Soon after her arrival, on 2 January 1979, Iranian students in the city attacked the house and attempted to burn it.
    More Details Hide Details Then she and her daughter took refuge at the Palm Springs estate of Walter Annenberg, former US ambassador to Great Britain.
  • 1978
    Age 81
    She arrived in Los Angeles on 30 December 1978 abroad an Imperial Iranian Air Force Boeing 747.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1941
    Age 44
    Reza Shah was deposed in 1941.
    More Details Hide Details Queen Nimtaj had four children: Shams Pahlavi, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, the last Shah of Iran, and his twin sister Ashraf, and Ali Reza Pahlavi I. Before the 1979 revolution, Tadj ol-Molouk was sent by Mohammad Reza Pahlavi to the house of Shams Pahlavi in Beverly Hills.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1934
    Age 37
    In the winter of 1934, Reza Shah demanded the presence of the Queen and the two princesses in an official ceremony at the Tehran Teacher's College.
    More Details Hide Details All three were present at this ceremony and were dressed in Western clothes, without a veil. This was the first time an Iranian queen showed herself in public. Afterwards, the Shah had pictures of his wife and daughters published; other men were ordered to unveil their wives and daughters. With this, the veil was abolished.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1896
    Born
    Born on March 17, 1896.
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