Tamara Toumanova
Russian ballet dancer
Tamara Toumanova
Tamara Toumanova was a prominent American ballerina and actress of Polish and Armenian descent. She made her debut at the age of 10 at the children's ballet of Paris Opera and was soon discovered by her fellow émigré, balletmaster George Balanchine, who made Tamara the star of his performances in the United States. While most of Toumanova's career was dedicated to ballet, she appeared in several films as well.
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Book Review: René Blum and the Ballets Russes by Judith Chazin-Bennahum - California Literary Review
Google News - over 5 years
Balanchine was given the initiative to produce new works and three young Russian dancers, the “Baby Ballerinas” Irina Baronova, Tatiana Riabouchinska and Tamara Toumanova made a sensational debut. Balanchine lasted a year. A hard-driving choreographer,
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Google News article
Efemérides de cultura del 29 de mayo - SDP Noticias
Google News - over 5 years
Fallece la bailarina rusa Tamara Toumanova, calificada como "La perla negra del ballet clásico ruso", cuyo trabajo es reconocido por coreógrafos como George Balanchine quien le abre espacios como bailarina huésped en diversas compañías internacionales
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ACTUS DE MONACO - Le Podcast Journal
Google News - almost 6 years
On y apprécia le talent de Margot Fonteyn, Yvette Chauviré et Tamara Toumanova. Et après avoir évoqué le départ des deux nouveaux mariés sur le yacht princier, Louise de Vilmorin conclut ainsi son article "Les colombes se sont envolées
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Google News article
DANCE REVIEW | NATIONAL BALLET OF CUBA; A Cuban Company Taking On Its Traditions, and Ballet's
NYTimes - almost 7 years
The National Ballet of Cuba came to fame as the project of the ballerina Alicia Alonso, who founded it in 1948. During her exceptionally long stage career and despite the presence of other good dancers, she often eclipsed her own company. Now that she has retired from performing, her company and school have gone on producing dancers of note,
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NYTimes article
Irina Baronova, Ballet Star, Dies at 89
NYTimes - over 8 years
Irina Baronova, an international ballet star who was one of three celebrated prodigies known as the ''baby ballerinas'' after George Balanchine discovered them in Paris in the 1930s, died on Saturday at her home in Byron Bay, New South Wales, Australia. She was 89. Her death was confirmed by her daughter, the actress Victoria Tennant. Australian
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NYTimes article
ART REVIEW | JOSEPH CORNELL; Poetic Theaters, Romantic Fevers
NYTimes - over 9 years
''Star-light, what is star-light, star-light is a little light that is not always mentioned with the sun, it is mentioned with the moon and the sun, it is mixed up with the rest of the time.'' That's Gertrude Stein in the ''Rooms'' section of ''Tender Buttons,'' her great, splintered portrait of interior space evoked through light, emotions and
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NYTimes article
ART REVIEW; Modernist Delicacy David Smith at 100
NYTimes - about 11 years
SISSIES were second-class citizens in mid-20th-century American culture. And art was a he-man's game: booze, broads, Sasquatch manners, the whole nine yards. Sure, a little sensitivity was O.K., as long as you didn't get carried away. It's as if there was a sign at the Cedar Bar door: Girlie-men need not apply. Except this picture isn't quite
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NYTimes article
CRITIC'S NOTEBOOK; In the Complex World of Ballet, It's Youth That Soars
NYTimes - about 11 years
Ballet is a young person's game. If you reach 40 and are still dancing principal roles, you're considered some kind of quirk of nature -- or resented by younger dancers for blocking their potential career paths. This emphasis on youth is disadvantageous if you admire dance forms, particularly Asian ones, in which the mature refinements of artistry
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NYTimes article
CRITIC'S NOTEBOOK; Retracing the Steps in Balanchine's Extraordinary Odyssey
NYTimes - over 12 years
Among the many surprises in ''George Balanchine, a Life's Journey in Ballet,'' an unusually rich exhibition on view through Aug. 27 at the Harvard Theater Collection, are the poignant letters Balanchine's parents wrote their son from the Soviet Union in the 1930's. Balanchine arrived in New York at the end of 1933, already hailed in Europe as the
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NYTimes article
Tatiana Riabouchinska, 83, Ballerina and Disney Model
NYTimes - over 16 years
Tatiana Riabouchinska, an international ballet star who was the model for the dancing hippopotamus in the 1940 film ''Fantasia'' and the oldest of the three ''baby ballerinas'' who brought fame to the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo in the 1930's, died on Aug. 24 in Los Angeles. She was 83 and lived in Los Angeles. Ms. Riabouchinska began her ballet
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NYTimes article
Muse, Interrupted
NYTimes - over 18 years
Around 1950, give or take a year or two, George Balanchine, the great choreographer and (with Lincoln Kirstein) founder of the New York City Ballet, fell in love -- a significant occurrence in anybody's life but in his case one that would have important consequences for the culture of this century. Over the course of the next several years, the man
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NYTimes article
The World in a Box
NYTimes - almost 20 years
UTOPIA PARKWAY The Life and Work of Joseph Cornell. By Deborah Solomon. Illustrated. 426 pp. New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux. $30. Sometimes -- unaccountably -- a seemingly marginal artist illuminates a period or a style, giving it an unforeseen perspective. In the case of Joseph Cornell, the secretive, shy maker of shadow boxes featuring cutouts
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NYTimes article
Tamara Toumanova, 77, Ballerina, Dies
NYTimes - over 20 years
Tamara Toumanova, a child-prodigy ballerina of the 1930's who became familiar to American audiences as one of the most glamorous stars of 20th-century dance, died on Wednesday at the Santa Monica Hospital in Santa Monica, Calif. She was 77 and lived in Beverly Hills. She died after a brief illness, said John Taras, a friend. By the time she was 13,
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NYTimes article
Igor Youskevitch, Master of Classical Ballet Style, Dies at 82
NYTimes - over 22 years
Igor Youskevitch, one of 20th-century ballet's greatest dancers and a master of classical style at its noblest when he starred with American Ballet Theater and the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, died yesterday at Lenox Hill Hospital. He was 82 and lived in Manhattan. He died of congestive heart failure, said Ilona Copen, co-director with Mr.
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Review/Dance; A Bolshoi Spinoff's 'Nutcracker' Variation
NYTimes - about 26 years
A new company from the Soviet Union arrived at the Brooklyn Academy of Music with a new "Nutcracker" on Wednesday night for a run through Dec. 30. Well, not entirely new. Yuri Grigorovich, the artistic director of the Bolshoi Ballet, created his own version of the Tchaikovsky ballet in 1966 in Moscow. When the old Metropolitan Opera House closed
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DANCE VIEW; Taking Fresh Stock of Les Ballets 1933
NYTimes - over 26 years
LEAD: Nostalgia and legend surround Les Ballets 1933, the first company that George Balanchine founded in the West. A more tangible and revealing reminder is the trailblazing exhibition that the four-year-old National Museum of Dance in Saratoga Springs is devoting to Balanchine's short-lived ballet troupe of 57 years ago. Nostalgia and legend
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NYTimes article
Review/Ballet; Joffrey Revival of the 1932 'Cotillon'
NYTimes - over 27 years
LEAD: The Joffrey Ballet performance of ''Cotillon'' on Wednesday at City Center (131 West 55th Street) did not look much like period descriptions of this 1932 ballet by Balanchine. Long lost and remembered with great pleasure by those who saw the original, ''Cotillon'' was an instance of Balanchine's gift for using what he had, in this case the
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NYTimes article
DANCE VIEW; A Boom Down Under
NYTimes - over 27 years
LEAD: Visiting Australia and New Zealand for the first time this summer, I was impressed by not only mountains, fjords and sophisticated cities but by the number of flourishing dance groups, some of them unfamiliar to audiences above the equator. Visiting Australia and New Zealand for the first time this summer, I was impressed by not only
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NYTimes article
DANCE; An English TroupePuts New EmphasisOn Ensemble Work
NYTimes - over 27 years
LEAD: When Peter Schaufuss, the Danish-born dancer, became artistic director of the London Festival Ballet in September 1984, he had big plans. At the top of his list were a new, varied repertory and a revitalized team of dancers, starting with the corps. He hoped to start a company school. He wanted a permanent London theater. When Peter
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NYTimes article
How 'Cotillon' Was Reborn
NYTimes - over 28 years
LEAD: When George Balanchine was named the first ballet master and choreographer of the Ballets Russes de Monte Carlo - the company formed to fill the void left by the collapse of Serge Diaghilev's Ballets Russes in 1929 - he immediately set about recruiting new dancers. For the troupe's 1932 debut season, he engaged Tamara Toumanova and Irina
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Tamara Toumanova
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1996
    Age 76
    Toumanova died in Santa Monica, California, on 29 May 1996, aged 77, from undisclosed causes.
    More Details Hide Details Before her death, she gave her Preobrajenska costumes to the Vaganova Choreographic Museum in St Petersburg, Russia. She was buried next to her mother Eugenie in Hollywood, Hollywood Forever Cemetery. British choreographer John Gregory described Toumanova as a "remarkable artist – a great personality who never stopped acting. It is impossible to think of Russian ballet without her."
  • FIFTIES
  • 1970
    Age 50
    In 1970 she played Russian ballerina "Madame Petrova" in Billy Wilder's The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes.
    More Details Hide Details Some sources indicate that Tamara Toumanova was born Tamara Vladimirovna Khassidovitch in Siberia, while her mother, Princess Eugenia (later Eugenie) Dmitrievna Toumanova was fleeing Georgia in search of her husband (Vladimir Khassidovitch)). Toumanova was of Armenian and Polish descent. Toumanova was reportedly also of partial Georgian descent, although singer Lyudmila Lopato, who personally knew Toumanova, wrote that "Tamara was of Armenian-Polish descent, not Georgian, as many people think". Toumanova's maternal grandfather Prince Dmitry Toumanov was a follower of the Armenian Apostolic Church. Toumanova's parents had become separated during the Russian Revolution. She was 18 months old before the family reunited. The family escaped from Russia via Vladivostok.
  • FORTIES
  • 1966
    Age 46
    In 1966, she played the odious, unnamed lead ballerina in Alfred Hitchcock's political thriller Torn Curtain.
    More Details Hide Details
  • THIRTIES
  • 1956
    Age 36
    In 1956 she performed a dance scene with Gene Kelly in Invitation to the Dance.
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  • 1953
    Age 33
    In 1953 she played Russian prima ballerina Anna Pavlova in Tonight We Sing, and in 1954 she appeared in the biographical musical, Deep in My Heart, as the French dancer Gaby Deslys.
    More Details Hide Details
  • TWENTIES
  • 1944
    Age 24
    In 1944 Toumanovna married Casey Robinson, whom she met as the producer and screenwriter of Days of Glory, her first film. The union was childless. The couple divorced on 13 October 1955.
    More Details Hide Details
    She made her feature film debut in 1944, in Days of Glory, playing a Russian dancer being saved from the invading Germans in 1941 by Soviet partisan leader Gregory Peck (who also made his debut in that film).
    More Details Hide Details
    Toumanova appeared in six Hollywood films between 1944 and 1970, always playing dancers.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1936
    Age 16
    In 1936, while Toumanova was performing ballet in Chicago, an 18-year-old boy named Burr Tillstrom came to see her perform.
    More Details Hide Details Following the ballet, Burr went backstage to meet her. As they talked, Toumanova and Tillstrom became friends. Some time later, Tillstrom showed her a favorite puppet he had made and she, surprised by his revelation, exclaimed, "Kukla" (Russian for "puppet"). Burr Tillstrom went on to create a very early (1947) television show for children, titled, Kukla, Fran and Ollie.
  • 1931
    Age 11
    In 1931, when Toumanova was twelve years old, George Balanchine saw her in ballet class and engaged her for de Basil's Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, along with Irina Baronova, 12, and Tatiana Riabouchinska, 14.
    More Details Hide Details The three girls were an immediate success, and the writer Arnold Haskell dubbed them the "baby ballerinas". Toumanova became recognised as a young prodigy of immense talent. She came to be called "The Black Pearl of the Russian Ballet", because, as ballet critic A. V. Coton wrote, "she was the loveliest creature in the history of the ballet", with black silky hair, deep brown eyes and pale almond skin. Toumanova was considered the most glamorous of the trio. Throughout her dynamic career, her mother was her devoted companion, nursemaid, dresser, agent and manager – she was always at the helm. Balanchine created the role of the "Young Girl" for Toumanova in his ballet Cotillon and had her star in his Concurrence and Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme. Léonide Massine worked closely with Toumanova in the creation of many of his ballets. She played the part of the Top in his Jeux d'Enfants. Balanchine created a role for her in his Le Palais de Cristal (since re-titled Symphony in C) in 1947 at the Paris Opera.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1925
    Age 5
    At the age of six, Toumanova was invited by the ballerina Anna Pavlova to perform in one of her gala concerts in 1925.
    More Details Hide Details Toumanova danced a polka choreographed by Preobrajenska. Tamara was ten years old when she made her debut at the Paris Opera as a child étoile in the ballet L'Éventail de Jeanne (for which ten French composers wrote the music).
  • 1919
    Born
    Born on March 2, 1919.
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