Tex Ritter
American country musician
Tex Ritter
Woodward Maurice Ritter, better known as Tex Ritter, was an American country music singer and movie actor popular from the mid-1930s into the 1960s, and the patriarch of the Ritter family in acting. He is a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame.
Biography
Tex Ritter's personal information overview.
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Steve Smith: Meat Loaf wants to die onstage - Pasadena Star-News
Google News - over 5 years
Among its other early inductees are Autry's cohort Smiley Burnette, Bill Monroe, Tex Ritter, Sons of the Pioneers leader Bob Nolan, Jimmy Wakely, Boudleaux and Felice Bryant, Lefty Frizzell, Roger Miller, Mel Tillis and Marty Robbins
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High noon (A la hora señalada) - Analítica.com
Google News - over 5 years
La película termina cuando Kane y Amy abandonan el pueblo, mientras escuchamos Do Not Forsake Me, esa pegajosa canción que Frankie Laine hizo tan popular durante los años cincuenta (en la película es interpretada por Tex Ritter)
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Why do todays professional athletes feel they're above the law? - WEEI.com
Google News - over 5 years
Series fifty here's a Tex Ritter -- Mikey please don't give Carl Crawford of free pass on -- thing. Coming home last night. I'm of the usual in view is a bad -- He will right now I feel better Redick one up against a lefty than Carl Crawford as they do
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The Patriots impressed everyone last night - WEEI.com
Google News - over 5 years
Series fifty here's a Tex Ritter -- Mikey please don't give Carl Crawford of free pass on -- thing. Coming home last night. I'm of the usual in view is a bad -- He will He didn't slide that was the problem jumped over the catcher I was dead. You know
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Aug. 12, 1939: Outlaw on the Run on the Screen - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
Admission was 10 to 15 cents all day for patrons to see Tex Ritter in the 1938 film Song of the Buckaroo at the Strand Theatre in Winder on Saturday, Aug. 12, 1939. Interested in a follow-up to this article? Great, we'll send you an email as soon as a
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Western star Ben Johnson adds a bit of character to TCM's Summer Under The Stars - Examiner.com
Google News - over 5 years
Side Note: In subsequent interviews and article written about the film, Bogdanovich revealed that he initially considered Tex Ritter for the role of Sam, while at the time considering Tex's real-life son, then-relative unknown actor, John Ritter for
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How much: Free - Nooga.com
Google News - over 5 years
He is the heir to a tradition of gaudy suits that were originally designed by his late ex father-in-law, Nudie (Cohn) from LA who started off making suits for early western motion picture stars such as Gene Autry, Roy Rogers, and Tex Ritter and people
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Buckhead Theatre marks anniversary - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
Radio characters like the Lone Ranger and Tex Ritter came alive on the big screen. [It] was the place where I could go and see a world much bigger and much different than my hometown. I loved the experience and I loved the place
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James Marlow: The Impresario of Murphysboro - Murphysboro American
Google News - over 5 years
It appears the last professional stage show at the Hippodrome in the early 1950s featured cowboy film star and country and western singer Tex Ritter and his horse White Flash. Ritter is probably best known for his performance of the Oscar-winning song
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Raising Meat in Greener Ways - Reuters
Google News - over 5 years
by Glenn Meyers Pioneering movie cowboys like John Wayne, Tex Ritter, and Gene Autry may not have been overly keen about the idea, but newer methods for raising beef in laboratory settings may prove to address some of our environmental,
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It takes a movie star: Robert Wagner enjoying Turner Classic Movies guest stint - Zap2it.com (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Friday (July 15), he'll introduce several films made by Western star Tex Ritter -- father of John, grandfather of Jason -- and the next night, he'll present Clark Gable movies ("Mogambo," "Band of Angels"). "They are absolutely first-rate,
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Garth Brooks, Reba And Taylor Swift To Receive Awards At 5th Annual ACM Honors - RTT News
Google News - over 5 years
Larry Gatlin and the Gatlin Brothers will also be recipients of the Cliffie Stone Pioneer Award, Hank Cochran will posthumously receive the Poet's Award and Gwyneth Paltrow's film, Country Strong, will receive the Tex Ritter Award
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THEN AND NOW: El Monte Legion Stadium was a happening place - Whittier Daily News
Google News - over 5 years
... Fats Domino, Tennessee Ernie Ford, Jerry Lee Lewis, Johnny Otis, Jim Reeves, Tex Ritter, Merle Travis, Ike and Tina Turner, Ritchie Valens and Stevie Wonder. But it's worth noting that the building started out as a venue for athletic events
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Tex Ritter
    CHILDHOOD
  • 1974
    In 1974, he had a heart attack and died in Nashville, Tennessee ten days before his 69th birthday.
    More Details Hide Details His last hit record was a cover of Gordon Sinclair's famous editorial "The Americans (A Canadian's Opinion)". It reached No. 35 on the country chart shortly after his death. He is interred at Oak Bluff Memorial Park in Section 8 in Port Neches in Jefferson County, Texas. His son John is interred at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Hollywood Hills, Los Angeles, California. Tex Ritter Park is located in Nederland, TX. For his contribution to the recording industry, Ritter has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6631 Hollywood Boulevard; he and John Ritter were the first father-and-son pair to be so honored in different categories. In 1980, he was inducted into the Western Performers Hall of Fame at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. There is Museum named for him in Carthage, Panola County, Texas and he was one of the first to be installed in the Texas Country Music Hall of Fame, also in Carthage.
  • 1970
    In 1970, Ritter surprised many people by entering Tennessee's Republican primary election for United States Senate.
    More Details Hide Details Despite high name recognition, he lost overwhelmingly to United States Representative Bill Brock, who then defeated the incumbent Senator Albert Gore, Sr. in the general election.
  • OTHER
  • 1967
    Ritter's 1967 single "Just Beyond The Moon" with lyrics by Jeremy Slate hit No. 3 on the country chart.
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  • 1966
    Ritter also played himself in the 1966 film Nashville Rebel, in which moviegoers were introduced to a little-known 29-year-old country singer named Waylon Jennings.
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  • 1965
    He moved to Nashville in 1965 and began working for WSM Radio and the Grand Ole Opry, earning a lifetime membership in the latter.
    More Details Hide Details His family remained in California temporarily so that son John could finish high school there. For a time, Dorothy was an official greeter at the Opry. During this period, Ritter co-hosted a late-night radio program with country disc jockey Ralph Emery.
  • 1964
    In 1964, he became the fifth inductee and first singing cowboy to be honored by the Country Music Hall of Fame.
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  • 1961
    In 1961, he hit the charts with "I Dreamed Of A Hill-Billy Heaven," which had actually been released six years earlier by Eddie Dean.
    More Details Hide Details Even after the peak of his performing career, Ritter was recognized for his contributions to country music and artistic versatility. He became one of the founding members of the Country Music Association in Nashville, Tennessee and spearheaded the effort to build the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum.
  • 1957
    In 1957, he released his first album, Songs From the Western Screen.
    More Details Hide Details He was often featured in archival footage on the children's television program, The Gabby Hayes Show.
  • 1955
    He formed Vidor Publications, Inc., a music publishing firm, with Johnny Bond, in 1955. "Remember the Alamo" was the first song in the catalog.
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    He made his national TV debut in 1955 on ABC-TV's Ozark Jubilee and was one of five rotating hosts for its 1961 NBC-TV spin-off, Five Star Jubilee.
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  • 1953
    In 1953, he began performing on Town Hall Party on radio and television in Los Angeles.
    More Details Hide Details In 1957 he co-hosted Ranch Party, a syndicated version of the show.
    At the first televised Academy Awards ceremony in 1953, he sang "High Noon", which received an Oscar for Best Song that year.
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  • 1952
    Ritter first toured Europe in 1952, where his appearances included a starring role in the Texas Western Spectacle at London's Harringay Arena.
    More Details Hide Details That same year, Ritter recorded the movie title-track song "High Noon (Do Not Forsake Me Oh My Darlin')", which became a hit.
  • 1948
    In 1948, "Rye Whiskey" and his cover of "The Deck of Cards" both made the top ten and "Pecos Bill" reached No. 15.
    More Details Hide Details In 1950, "Daddy's Last Letter (Private First Class John H. McCormick)" also became a hit.
  • 1945
    Between 1945 and 1946, he registered seven consecutive top five hits, including "You Two-Timed Me One Time Too Often" (No. 1) written by Jenny Lou Carson, which spent eleven weeks on the charts.
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    In 1945, he had the No. 1, 2, and 3 songs on Billboard's Most Played Jukebox Folk Records poll, a first in the industry.
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  • 1944
    In 1944, he scored a hit with "I'm Wastin' My Tears on You", which hit No. 1 on the country chart and eleven on the pop chart. "There's a New Moon Over My Shoulder" was a country chart No. 2 and pop chart No. 21.
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  • 1942
    Ritter's recording career was his most successful period. He was the first artist signed with the newly formed Capitol Records as well as its first Western singer. His first recording session was on June 11, 1942.
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  • 1941
    Ritter was married to actress Dorothy Fay on June 14, 1941, until his death.
    More Details Hide Details The couple had two sons, Thomas Matthews "Tom" Ritter (b. January 8, 1947) and actor John Ritter (September 17, 1948 – September 11, 2003). Tex helped start United Cerebral Palsy after his son, Thomas was found to have cerebral palsy. Ritter and his sons spent a great deal of time raising money and public awareness to help others with the illness. He is also the grandfather of actors, Jason and Tyler Ritter. In the early 70s Mr. Ritter often sang gospel music and spoke at a number of southern churches.
  • 1938
    Between 1938 and 1945, he starred in around forty "singing cowboy" movies.
    More Details Hide Details He made four movies with actress Dorothy Fay at Monogram Pictures: Song of the Buckaroo (1938), Sundown on the Prairie (1939), Rollin' Westward (1939) and Rainbow Over the Range (1940). Ritter then moved to Universal Pictures and teamed with Johnny Mack Brown for films such as The Lone Star Trail (1943), Raiders of San Joaquin (1943), Cheyenne Roundup (1943) and The Old Chisholm Trail (1942). He was also the star of the films Arizona Trail (1943), Marshal of Gunsmoke (1944) and Oklahoma Raiders (1944). When Universal developed financial difficulties, Ritter moved to Producers Releasing Corporation as "Texas Ranger Tex Haines" for eight features between 1944 and 1945. Ritter did not return to acting until 1950, playing mostly supporting roles or appearing as himself.
  • 1936
    In 1936, Ritter moved to Los Angeles.
    More Details Hide Details His motion picture debut was in Song of the Gringo (1936) for Grand National Pictures. He starred in twelve B-movie Westerns for Grand National, including Headin' for the Rio Grande (1936), and Trouble in Texas (1937) co-starring Rita Hayworth (then known as Rita Cansino). After starring in Utah Trail (1938), Ritter left financially troubled Grand National.
  • 1935
    In 1935, he signed with Decca Records, where he recorded his first original recordings, "Sam Hall" and "Whoopie Ti Yi Yo".
    More Details Hide Details He recorded 29 songs for Decca, the last in 1939 in Los Angeles as part of Tex Ritter and His Texans. Ritter was also cast in guest-starring roles on the syndicated television series, Death Valley Days, and the ABC western series, The Rebel, starring Nick Adams as a wandering former Confederate.
  • 1933
    Ritter began recording for American Record Company (Columbia Records) in 1933.
    More Details Hide Details His first release was "Goodbye Ole Paint". He also recorded "Rye Whiskey" for the label.
    Ritter wrote and starred in Cowboy Tom's Roundup on WINS-AM in 1933, a daily children's cowboy program aired over two other East Coast stations for three years.
    More Details Hide Details He also performed on the radio show WHN Barndance and sang on NBC Radio shows; and appeared in several radio dramas, including CBS's Bobby Benson's Adventures.
  • 1932
    In 1932, he starred in New York City's first broadcast Western, The Lone Star Rangers on WOR-AM, where he sang and told tales of the Old West.
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  • 1928
    An early pioneer of country music, Ritter soon became interested in show business. In 1928, he sang on KPRC-AM in Houston, a 30-minute program of mostly cowboy songs.
    More Details Hide Details That same year, he moved to New York City and landed a job in the men's chorus of the Broadway show, The New Moon (1928). He appeared as cowboy Cord Elam in the Broadway production Green Grow the Lilacs (1931), the basis for the musical Oklahoma! He also played the part of Sagebrush Charlie in The Round Up (1932) and Mother Lode (1934).
  • 1905
    Born on January 12, 1905.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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