Thelma Todd
American actress
Thelma Todd
Thelma Alice Todd was an American actress. Appearing in about 120 pictures between 1926 and 1935, she is best remembered for her comedic roles in films like Marx Brothers' Monkey Business and Horse Feathers, a number of Charley Chase's short comedies, and co-starring with Buster Keaton and Jimmy Durante in Speak Easily.
Biography
Thelma Todd's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Thelma Todd
News
News abour Thelma Todd from around the web
Young to Reveal Palisades Gossip - Palisadian-Post
Google News - over 5 years
Participants will speculate about the mysterious death of actress Thelma Todd near her Pacific Coast Highway caf' and nightclub. Larger-than-life characters such as Will Rogers, Ronald Reagan, Frank Sinatra and Lee Marvin all lived in the Palisades and
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Google News article
VIDEO; Chopin, Schubert And Dietrich (The Latter Nude)
NYTimes - over 5 years
AFTER ''Blonde Venus'' flopped in 1932, Paramount decided to break up the powerful creative alliance between the director Josef von Sternberg and the actress Marlene Dietrich, whom he had discovered in Germany and brought to Hollywood. While Sternberg, who was Jewish, entertained bizarre fantasies of returning to Germany to work for the
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NYTimes article
Chopin, Schubert and Dietrich (the Latter Nude) - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
Cary Grant and Thelma Todd in “This Is the Night” (1932), half of a “Pre-Code Double Feature.” Dietrich was still a valuable property, and the studio was probably trying to do its best by her by assigning “The Song of Songs” (1933) to Rouben Mamoulian,
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Google News article
Curtain closes a last time at Hollywood Theatre - Vancouver Sun
Google News - almost 6 years
The opening night marquee featured a double bill, Will Rogers in Life Begins at 40 and Thelma Todd in Lightning Strikes Twice. When it opened, the papers carried ads for 26 movie theatres in Vancouver, three in Kitsilano alone
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Google News article
La maledizione della Joyita - Paperblog
Google News - almost 6 years
Tra l'altro West aveva una fama sinistra, visto che non fu mai chiarito il suo ruolo nella morte “accidentale” di Thelma Todd, sua amica e amante, trovata morta nel garage del produttore. Tuttavia qualcuno ha ipotizzato che la Todd fu uccisa a bordo
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Google News article
Who killed the Ice Cream Blonde? - Santa Monica Daily Press
Google News - almost 6 years
Before there was Angelina Jolie, Elizabeth Taylor or Katharine Hepburn, there was Thelma Todd, a mercurial talent and dynamic force who blasted onto the Hollywood scene in 1925 and captivated the public until her mysterious death in
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Google News article
DVD Extra: Southwest noir, 'nude' Dietrich, Fonda and Caine go South; 'The ... - New York Post (blog)
Google News - almost 6 years
He's fifth-billed as a javelin thrower who returns from the Los Angeles Olympics to his wife (Thelma Todd) who has been carrying on with Roland Young in his absence. To allay suspicion, Young's pal Charlie Ruggles signs up top-billed Lila Damita (Errol
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Google News article
What's On Today
NYTimes - about 6 years
8 P.M. (TCM) SPOTLIGHT: HAL ROACH STUDIOS They called it ''the lot that laughter built.'' From 1914 to 1960 the Hal Roach Studios set in motion the careers of Laurel and Hardy, Harold Lloyd, Harry Langdon (left) and Our Gang, competing with film industry bigwigs through a prodigious output of comedy shorts, independent features and television
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FROM THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE; 100, 75, 50 Years Ago
NYTimes - about 6 years
1910 War on Opium Brings Results As Liu-Yu-Lin, the newly appointed Chinese Ambassador to the Court of St. James, left Peking two months ago, and has been travelling most of the time since, he did not feel at liberty to express an opinion on recent affairs when he passed through Colombo. As Chief Commissioner of the Opium Conference held at
Article Link:
NYTimes article
Corrections
NYTimes - about 10 years
The Critic's Choice column on Tuesday, about new DVDs, referred incorrectly to the use of a pseudonym for the actress Thelma Todd in the credits for ''Corsair,'' a 1931 film now out on DVD, and misspelled the surname of the pseudonym. Ms. Todd, who was known for her comic roles, was listed as Alison Loyd, not Lloyd, for ''Corsair,'' a drama, to
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NYTimes article
Critic's Choice: New DVDs
NYTimes - about 10 years
Robert Mitchum The Signature Collection Vincente Minnelli is justly famous for his MGM musicals, which include ''Meet Me in St. Louis'' (1944) and ''The Band Wagon'' (1953). But his talent also prospered in a different, though related, genre, the domestic melodrama. Mostly dismissed as ''women's pictures'' at the time of their release, Minnelli
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NYTimes article
Critic's Choice: New DVD's
NYTimes - over 10 years
Three Falcons, All Maltese Remakes, according to a deeply ingrained critical convention, are inevitably inferior to the original films. Exhibit A in the case against that irrational assumption has long been John Huston's 1941 ''Maltese Falcon,'' featuring Humphrey Bogart in his star-making role as Dashiell Hammett's hard-boiled private detective,
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NYTimes article
Mr. Loophole, Is That You?
NYTimes - over 11 years
Long Island has a lot of lawyers -- and a lot of lawyer problems, according to the Lawyers' Fund for Client Protection, a state agency that reimburses victims of those who have stumbled, ethically speaking, after stepping up to the bar. According to a June 16 article in The Times, the fund has seen a spike in clients bilked by New York lawyers --
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NYTimes article
Don't Say Good Night Yet, Gracie: Vaudeville on Film
NYTimes - almost 24 years
George Burns, wearing a fedora and a suit, and Gracie Allen, in a frilly garden-party dress and large floppy hat, stand in the center of the screen and talk, stealing glances at the camera as they do. George: "Can I give you a ride home in my car?" Gracie: "I'm too tired. I'd rather walk." After seven or eight minutes of such banter, they sing a
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NYTimes article
Home Video
NYTimes - about 24 years
It's called a video, but nothing about Voyager's special edition of "A Hard Day's Night," to be released next month, resembles a movie video in the conventional sense. To begin with, the picture image, which measures 2 by 3 inches, takes up only a fraction of the screen. That's a computer screen, not a television screen. Intended for a small group
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NYTimes article
Hal Roach Is Dead at 100; A Pioneer in Film Comedy
NYTimes - over 24 years
Hal Roach, the writer, producer and director who was a leading pioneer in shaping American film comedy, died yesterday at the UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles. He was 100 years old and lived in Bel-Air, Calif. He died of pneumonia, said a friend, Richard Bann. Mr. Roach helped make stars of Harold Lloyd, Will Rogers, Harry Langdon and Charley
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NYTimes article
Hal Roach Recalls His First Century
NYTimes - about 25 years
The cinema celebrates its 100th birthday next year, but Hal Roach got there first. The man who paired Laurel with Hardy, put black glasses on Harold Lloyd and cranked out more than 200 Our Gang comedies began his second century last week, and Thursday night the Smithsonian Resident Associate Program will honor him at the National Museum of Natural
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NYTimes article
CONNECTICUT GUIDE
NYTimes - over 25 years
GUPPIES AND GOLDFISH Fish hobbyists will have plenty to look at and buy at a show of the Exotic Fish Society of Fairfield on Saturday and Sunday from 1 to 6 P.M. in the Westport Nature Center, 10 Woodside Lane. In addition to fish and a wide variety of related items on display, there will be auctions of fish, food, magazine subscriptions and
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Thelma Todd
    TWENTIES
  • 1935
    Age 28
    On the morning of December 16, 1935, Thelma Todd was found dead in her car inside the garage of Jewel Carmen, a former actress and former wife of Todd's lover and business partner, Roland West.
    More Details Hide Details Carmen's house was approximately a block from the topmost side of Todd's restaurant. Her death was determined to have been caused by carbon monoxide poisoning. West is quoted in a contemporaneous newspaper account as having locked her out, which may have caused her to seek refuge and warmth in the car. Todd had a wide circle of friends and associates as well as a busy social life. Police investigations revealed that she had spent the previous Saturday night (December 14) at the Trocadero, a popular Hollywood restaurant, at a party hosted by entertainer Stanley Lupino and his actress daughter, Ida. At the restaurant, she had had a brief but unpleasant exchange with her ex-husband, Pat DiCicco. However, her friends stated that she was in good spirits, and were aware of nothing unusual in her life that could suggest a reason for her committing suicide. She was driven home from the party in the early hours of December 15 by her chauffeur, Ernest O. Peters. The detectives of the LAPD concluded that Todd's death was accidental, the result of her either warming up the car to drive it or using the heater to keep herself warm.
    Todd continued her short-subject series through 1935, and was featured in the full-length Laurel and Hardy comedy The Bohemian Girl.
    More Details Hide Details This was her last film; she died after completing all of her scenes, but most of them were re-shot. Producer Roach deleted all of Todd's dialogue and limited her appearance to one musical number.
  • 1934
    Age 27
    In August 1934, she opened a successful cafe at Pacific Palisades, called Thelma Todd's Sidewalk Cafe, attracting a diverse clientele of Hollywood celebrities as well as many tourists.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1931
    Age 24
    She also appeared successfully in such dramas as the original 1931 film version of The Maltese Falcon starring Ricardo Cortez as Sam Spade, in which she played Miles Archer's treacherous widow.
    More Details Hide Details During her career she appeared in 119 films although many of these were short films, and was sometimes publicized as "The Ice Cream Blonde".
    In 1931, Todd became romantically involved with director Roland West, and starred in his film, Corsair.
    More Details Hide Details Todd became highly regarded as a capable film comedian, and Roach loaned her out to other studios to play opposite Wheeler & Woolsey, Buster Keaton, Joe E. Brown, and the Marx Brothers.
    In 1931 she was given her own series, teaming with ZaSu Pitts ("Zay-soo," also her character's name) for slapstick comedies.
    More Details Hide Details This was Roach's attempt to create a female version of Laurel and Hardy. When Pitts left Roach in 1933, she was replaced by Patsy Kelly. The Todd shorts often cast her as a working girl having all sorts of problems, and trying her best to remain poised and charming despite the embarrassing antics of her sidekick.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1925
    Age 18
    However, in her late teens, she began entering beauty pageants, winning the title of Miss Massachusetts in 1925.
    More Details Hide Details While representing her home state, she was spotted by a Hollywood talent scout and began her career in film at Paramount. During the silent film era, Todd appeared in numerous supporting roles that made full use of her beauty but gave her little chance to act. With the advent of the talkies, Todd was given opportunity to expand her roles when producer Hal Roach signed her to appear with such comedy stars as Harry Langdon, Charley Chase, and Laurel and Hardy.
  • 1923
    Age 16
    Todd was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts to John Shaw Todd and Alice Elizabeth Edwards, and was a bright student who achieved good academic results. She intended to become a school teacher and enrolled at the Lowell Normal School (now University of Massachusetts, Lowell) after graduating from high school in 1923.
    More Details Hide Details
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1906
    Born
    Born on July 29, 1906.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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