Thomas B. Marsh
First President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles
Thomas B. Marsh
Thomas Baldwin Marsh was an early leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and an original member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. He served as the first President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints from 1835 to 1839. He was excommunicated from the Church in 1839, and remained disaffected for much of his life. Marsh rejoined the church in July 1857, but never again served in Church leadership positions.
Biography
Thomas B. Marsh's personal information overview.
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County approves power line easement - Cumberland Times-News
Google News - over 5 years
Speaking at the commission meeting were Westernport resident Thomas Marsh, who spoke against a proposed Potomac River water plant and instead asked that an earlier plan for a county loop system be revived for consideration
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Adventures abound at Camp Lakamaga - Country Messenger
Google News - over 5 years
Thomas Marsh used an oil based crayon to make his “masterpiece.” “I made a hammer hitting a nail, because that's what hammers are supposed to do,” Marsh said. “I don't think I want to be a carpenter when I grow up, though. I just felt like drawing this
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Arts Center Art Walk - Orange County Review
Google News - over 5 years
Portrait sculpture, bas relief, and écorché created by students during workshops taught this summer by classical sculptor Thomas Marsh. One night only: Sept. 1, 5-7 pm The Light Well serves up chicken in oil and acrylic by two of our area's most
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WSU faculty members named to state science academy - WSU Today
Google News - over 5 years
Agricultural economist Thomas Marsh and plant biologist Gerald Edwards will join 22 others from around the state when they are inducted at the academy's fourth annual meeting in Seattle Sept. 22. They will bring the academy's total membership to 154
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Summer 2011: When It All Started To Unravel - Hartford Courant
Google News - over 5 years
Speaking of which, I welcome Thomas Marsh, Duke of Chester and leader of the Grand Duchy of Cute Towns. We certainly miss having Chester, Deep River, Haddam and all those other river communities as part of our state, but the Duke and I spent part of
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Readers name their birding mentors - NorthJersey.com
Google News - over 5 years
Maria Marino, formerly of Mahwah and recently relocated to Florida, wrote about another exemplary naturalist in his eighties — my friend Stiles Thomas, marsh warden emeritus of the Celery Farm Natural Area in Allendale. Thomas' tireless efforts were
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Researcher presents new views on 18th century mixed races and their families - William and Mary News
Google News - over 5 years
According to his paper, “Preparing to Meet the Atlantic Family: Relatives of Color in Eighteenth-Century Britain,” mixed-race children like Edward Thomas Marsh and James Tailyour and their families' responses signified a time in Britain where society
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Moving On Up - NJ TODAY
Google News - over 5 years
Twelve graduates received certificates at the ceremony: Ryan Adams, Matthew Faust, Annie Gu, Thomas Marsh, Siddharth Patel, Kapriana Payami, Jayne Ritter, Jamei Schenck, Sania Shahane, Claudia Shankman, Ridhimaa Thaker and Nicholas Vargas
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Washingtonis mälestati kommunismiohvreid - Postimees
Google News - over 5 years
... endine USA suursaadik Eestis Aldona Wos, monumendi koos president George W. Bushiga avanud USA Esindajatekoja väliskomitee esimehe Tom Lantose lesk ja Lantose Sihtasutuse esinaine Annette Lantos ning mälestusmärgi skulptor Thomas Marsh
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Victims of Communism Remembered at June 9 Wreath Laying - Human Events
Google News - over 5 years
The sculptor of the statue, Thomas Marsh, said he donated all of his time creating the 9.5-foot bronze work and only charged for expenses he could not control, such as materials and transportation. He is also very proud that his participating in the
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Childs races set to enter 43rd season - MassLive.com
Google News - almost 6 years
The Western New England company included: Evan Kalaher, Daniel DelloRusso, Jacob Luchuck, Cody Scheidle, Colby Olin, Matthew Joyner, Jeffrey Lewis, Thomas Marsh, Matthew Hansen, Matthew Fallon, Griffin King and Jefferson Sherman
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Clyde Marsh - Keyser Mineral Daily News Tribune
Google News - almost 6 years
... three sisters, Evelyn McCarty of Westernport, Mary Lou Smith of Westernport, Thelma “Beanie” Failinger and husband Jake of Frostburg; a brother, Thomas Marsh and wife Jackie of Westernport; and a daughter-in-law, Regina Marsh of Westernport
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IN PERFORMANCE; Tap, Tap, Tapping In Premieres
NYTimes - almost 18 years
Peggy Spina Tap Company Peggy Spina Studio Everyone in the Peggy Spina Tap Company looked like bright people in ''Tapping Soul,'' a tap revue on Saturday night at Ms. Spina's studio at 115 Prince Street in SoHo. They surely made theatergoers feel bright just to see them tap in such an urbane and rhythmically intricate style. Ms. Spina's new ''In
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Massive Brain Drain
NYTimes - almost 20 years
To the Editor: Re ''Europe's Role in Albania'' (editorial, March 14): While events in Albania are fluid and dynamic, it must be remembered that the country has experienced a massive brain drain; virtually everyone who is educated, talented and able left the country, either when Albania opened its long-sealed borders or during the diaspora of 1991.
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Symbol of Tiananmen Square Is Resurrected
NYTimes - over 22 years
Five years after a tank crushed the 40-foot-high statue of the Goddess of Democracy in Tiananmen Square in Beijing, supporters of the human rights movement in China gathered here today to unveil a bronze statue modeled after the original. The original, made of plaster, was a symbol for the students who briefly stood up to the Chinese authorities in
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Thomas B. Marsh
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1866
    Age 66
    Marsh died in Ogden, Utah Territory in January 1866, apparently a pauper.
    More Details Hide Details He is buried at the Ogden Cemetery. On April 6, 1856, George A. Smith claimed that Marsh had left the church because of a dispute between his wife and other Mormon women over a milk cow, which had escalated all the way up to the First Presidency. LDS Church president Gordon B. Hinckley has repeated the story, as do official church publications. Despite his prominence in early church history, Marsh is infrequently mentioned in instructional classes, discourses on religion or sermons in the LDS Church. Marsh's conversion story is occasionally cited as an example of how powerful the Book of Mormon can be in convincing people of the truthfulness of the church. When his apostasy is mentioned, he is often referred to either as an example of pride or as an example of one who failed to fulfill his calling to serve the church. For example, in 2006, David A. Bednar of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, repeated the "milk and strippings story". He contrasted Marsh's faithlessness with the devotion of Brigham Young. Bednar states: "In many instances, choosing to be offended is a symptom of a much deeper and more serious spiritual malady. Thomas B. Marsh allowed himself to be acted upon, and the eventual results were apostasy and misery. Brigham Young was an agent who exercised his agency and acted in accordance with correct principles, and he became a mighty instrument in the hands of the Lord."
  • 1864
    Age 64
    Marsh wrote an autobiography in 1864, recounting his church service and rebellion.
    More Details Hide Details It was published in the Millennial Star of that year. However, his religious affiliation still may not have been fixed. According to Elder Thomas Job, a missionary of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints serving in Utah, shortly before his death Marsh: had been in the Josephite conference in Salt Lake City, and bore a strong testimony to the truth, and necessity of the reorganization; and when a revelation through young Joseph was read to him he said that it was the voice of God, and again testified that he knew it, and desired us to write to the young prophet to send for him back from here, that he had faith that he would bear the journey, and join the young prophet, if he could go that last spring. After Marsh moved to Utah and joined the LDS Church, he spoke of his split with Smith:
  • FIFTIES
  • 1857
    Age 57
    In 1857, Marsh was rebaptized into the LDS Church.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1839
    Age 39
    Marsh was excommunicated, in absentia, from the church on March 17, 1839 in Quincy, Illinois.
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  • 1838
    Age 38
    Marsh drafted and signed a legal affidavit against Smith on October 24, 1838, which Hyde also signed.
    More Details Hide Details In addition to reporting on the organization of the Danites and on the events in Daviess County, Marsh reported rumors that the Danites had set up a "destroying company" and that "if the people of Clay & Ray made any movement against them, this destroying company was to burn Liberty & Richmond." He further stated his belief that Smith planned "to take the State, & he professes to his people to intend taking the U.S. & ultimately the whole world". Marsh's testimony added to the panic in northwestern Missouri and contributed to subsequent events in the Mormon War.
    On October 19, 1838, the day after Gallatin was burned, Marsh and fellow apostle Orson Hyde left the association of the church.
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    In April 1838, President of the Church Joseph Smith and his first counselor Sidney Rigdon moved to Far West, which became the new church headquarters.
    More Details Hide Details In Missouri, some of the Mormons, led by Sampson Avard, formed a society which came to be known as the "Danites." According to Marsh, these men swore oaths to "support the heads of the church in all things that they say or do, whether right or wrong". Although disfellowshipped, David and John Whitmer, Oliver Cowdery, W.W. Phelps and other former leaders (who were known as the "dissenters") continued to live in the county. According to Reed Peck, two of these Danites, Jared Carter and Dimick B. Huntington, proposed at a meeting that the society should kill the dissenters. Marsh and fellow moderate, John Corrill, spoke vigorously against the motion. On the following Sunday, however, Sidney Rigdon issued his "Salt Sermon" in which he likened the dissenters to salt that had lost its savor and was "good for nothing, but to be cast out, and to be trodden under foot of men". Within a week the dissenters had fled the county.
    On April 6, 1838, Marsh was named as President of the Church in Missouri, with David W. Patten and Brigham Young as his assistants.
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    Marsh sided with the church's Presidency and convened a series of church courts in the spring of 1838.
    More Details Hide Details He charged the Whitmers Phelps, and Oliver Cowdery of financial impropriety and other failings. The court released these men from their positions and disfellowshipped them.
  • 1836
    Age 36
    In September 1836, Marsh returned to Missouri and joined the Latter Day Saints in their new location, a city called Far West in Caldwell County, Missouri.
    More Details Hide Details The town had been founded by the presidency of the Missouri Stake, consisting of David Whitmer, W. W. Phelps and John Whitmer. Meanwhile, in Kirtland, the financial situation of many of the Mormons unraveled with the failure of the Kirtland Safety Society bank. A dispute arose between the presidency in Missouri and the church's First Presidency in Kirtland over the land funds, with both sides accusing the other of financial improprieties.
    Brother T. B. Marsh arrived in Tennessee on his mission to collect means, and attend a Conference with the brethren laboring in Tennessee and Kentucky, which was held on Damon's Creek, Callaway County, Kentucky, Sept. 2nd 1836. T. B. Marsh presided.
    More Details Hide Details Seven Branches were represented containing 133 members. Sept. 19th. - Elders T. B. Marsh, D. W. Patten, E. H. Groves and Sister Patten left the Saints in Kentucky and Tennessee and started for Far West, Missouri, where they arrived in peace and safety.
    After these activities with the Twelve Apostles, Marsh returned to Fishing River, Clay County, Missouri, in April 1836.
    More Details Hide Details Severe difficulties between Mormons and the larger community continued to plague the Latter Day Saints in Missouri. Marsh was chosen as a delegate from his community to try to resolve these issues. Despite the efforts of church members, their Missouri neighbors decided that the Saints must leave Clay County. Marsh traveled to Latter Day Saint congregations in other states, including Tennessee and Kentucky, gathering loans at an interest of ten percent to help the Clay County Saints obtain new property. The diary of apostle Wilford Woodruff contains an account of part of that journey: Aug. 20th - Elder David Patten preached at the house of Randolph Alexander, and after meeting baptized him and his wife.
  • 1835
    Age 35
    He served as the first President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints from 1835 to 1839.
    More Details Hide Details He was excommunicated from the church in 1839, and remained disaffected for almost 18 years. Marsh was rebaptized into The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) in July 1857, but never again served in church leadership positions. Marsh was born in the town of Acton, Massachusetts, to James Marsh and Mary Law. He spent his early life farming in Westmoreland, New Hampshire. As a young man, Marsh developed a pattern of traveling and working for various employers. Marsh ran away at age 14 to Chester, Vermont, and worked as a farmer for three months. Then he left for Albany, New York, working as a waiter for 18 months. He spent two years working at the New York City Hotel, then returned to Albany for a year, and then back at the New York hotel for two more years. He also spent 18 months working as a groom for Edward Griswold on Long Island, New York.
  • 1831
    Age 31
    Marsh moved with the church to Kirtland, Ohio in the spring of 1831.
    More Details Hide Details He was ordained a high priest and received a call to proselytize in Missouri with Ezra Thayre. Thayre delayed for a long time, and so Selah J. Griffin was appointed to take Thayre's place. Smith organized the first Quorum of the Twelve Apostles on February 14–15, 1835. Smith arranged the members of the quorum by age. As there was confusion over David W. Patten's birth date, Marsh was identified as the eldest of the apostles and was therefore designated Quorum President. According to Marsh's autobiographical sketch, published in 1864: "In January, 1835, in company with Bishop Partridge and agreeable to revelation, I proceeded to Kirtland, where we arrived early in the spring, when I learned I had been chosen one of the Twelve Apostles.... May 4, 1835, in company with the Twelve I left Kirtland and preached through the eastern states, holding conferences, regulating and organizing the churches, and returned September 25.... In the winter of 1835–36, I attended school, studied the first English grammar under Sidney Rigdon, and Hebrew under Professor Seixas (a Hebrew by birth)".
  • 1830
    Age 30
    Shortly after his arrival, Marsh was baptized by David Whitmer in Cayuga Lake, and a few months later ordained an elder by Cowdery. From September 26 to September 28, 1830, Smith received Doctrine and Covenants section 31, a revelation directed at Marsh.
    More Details Hide Details In this section, he was told that he would be as "a physician to the church".
    Returning to his home, Marsh showed the sixteen pages to his wife. They both were pleased and began to correspond with Cowdery and Smith. After the Church of Christ was formed on April 6, 1830, Marsh moved with his family to Palmyra to join them that September.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1829
    Age 29
    In 1829, Marsh unexpectedly left his home in Boston and journeyed west, traveling with Benjamin Hall, one of his friends from the Quietist sect.
    More Details Hide Details In his words, "I believed the Spirit of God dictated me to make a journey west." He stayed at Lima, New York in Livingston County for three months before returning home. On the way home, he stopped at Lyonstown, where a woman informed him of the golden plates that Joseph Smith had obtained. She directed him to Palmyra, New York, and told him to seek out Martin Harris for more information. Marsh traveled to Palmyra and discovered Harris at a printing office, working on the printing of the Book of Mormon. Marsh was able to obtain the first sixteen pages of the book as a printer's proof. Marsh also met Oliver Cowdery at the printing office.
  • 1820
    Age 20
    During the time Marsh was employed by Griswold, he was married to Elizabeth Godkin on his 21st birthday in 1820.
    More Details Hide Details After his marriage, he attempted unsuccessfully to run a grocery business for 18 months. He subsequently spent seven years working at a type foundry in Boston, Massachusetts. During his work at the type foundry, Marsh became a member of the Methodist Church. However, Marsh became dissatisfied because he came to believe that Methodism did not correspond to the Bible. Marsh left the Methodist Church and joined a group of friends in what others called a Quietist sect.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1800
    Age 0
    Born in 1800.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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