Thomas McGuane
American novelist
Thomas McGuane
Thomas Francis McGuane III is an American author. His work includes ten novels, short fiction and screenplays, as well as three collections of essays devoted to his life in the outdoors.
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Thomas McGuane's personal information overview.
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Thomas McGuane’s ‘Crow Fair’
NYTimes - almost 2 years
Thomas McGuane’s story collection, his first in nine years, returns to the untamed spaces of his native Montana.
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NYTimes article
Blades of Glory
Wall Street Journal - almost 5 years
Literary progeny Thomas McGuane Jr. carves custom knives mightier than the pen.
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Wall Street Journal article
Thomas McGuane: Modernizing Montana literature - The Bozeman Daily Chronicle
Google News - over 5 years
Author Thomas McGuane pets his English Pointer, Daisy, inside his home on the West Boulder River recently. In the middle of the Montana countryside — wide open except for fences, livestock and occasional houses — writer Thomas McGuane makes his home
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Google News article
Book Review: Blue Collar, White Collar, No Collar - New Zealand Herald
Google News - over 5 years
You see this in Junot Diaz's monosyllabic moving man; in Thomas McGuane's "dyin' way of life" cowboy; Ford's own grim, ultimately grisly glimpse of a career betrayed. Elsewhere, Munro's 13-year-old watches gardener, teacher, masseuse, while she starts
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Google News article
Le paradoxe de l'interviewer - Blog Le Monde (Blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Deux volumes parce qu'il ya du monde et du beau : James Baldwin, William Burroughs, Susan Sontag, Jim Harrison, Jack Kerouac, John Le Carré, William Faulkner, JL Borges, Vladimir Nabokov, Thomas McGuane, Marguerite Yourcenar, Mary McCarthy,
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Lo zen di Fonzie: vado a pesca di trote e divento scrittore - Corriere della Sera
Google News - over 5 years
Parole che sembrano venire dai cantori dei grandi spazi americani, Thomas McGuane o Rick Bass o Norman MacLean. Ma a pronunciarle è Fonzie Fonzarelli. O meglio, Henry Winkler, l' attore di «Happy Days» idolo transgenerazionale per milioni di ex-ragazzi
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Google News article
Comment je me suis disputé avec mes cookies - Le Figaro (Blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Il ya quelque temps, j'ai passé commande d'un roman de l'écrivain américain Thomas McGuane, dont je suis un lecteur fervent. Il se trouve que McGuane y parle (et merveilleusement bien) de la pêche à la mouche. Mais ce n'est pas la raison pour laquelle
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Reading about the outdoors -- outdoors - Winnipeg Free Press
Google News - over 5 years
Walsh's list also includes Green Hills of Africa by Ernest Hemingway and The Longest Silence: A Life in Fishing by Thomas McGuane. Chef Alex Svenne of Winnipeg's Bistro 7º responded to my Tweet for outdoor books with this little gem
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Endless conversation - Idaho Mountain Express and Guide
Google News - over 5 years
Italo Calvino and Jorge Luis Borges get along somehow, just like Jim Harrison and Thomas McGuane. I read Larry McMurtry instead of Louis L'amour, Steven King instead of all those other scary writers. Thomas Pynchon's early work ruined me to other
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Big Screen Berkeley: The Missouri Breaks - Berkeleyside
Google News - over 5 years
John Williams' score is satisfying and surprisingly complex, cinematographer Michael Butler effectively captures the earthy browns, cloudy grays and watery blues of the Montana badlands, and Thomas McGuane's screenplay features one undeniably great
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Book Report: Worthy of note: A fictitious life, rock solid prose - Pierce County Herald
Google News - almost 6 years
“Driving on the Rim,” by Thomas McGuane (Knopf, $26.95), is definitely not a novel about the tire shortage during World War II, when some people actually did drive on their rims. No, the wildly talented McGuane has created a character who
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Between the Lines: Reading for the pet lover's soul - Kansas City Star
Google News - almost 6 years
"Blue Collar, White Collar, No Collar," edited by Richard Ford (Harper Perennial, $16.99, 624 pages): Short stories about work - which defines us - from 32 masters of fiction including Thomas McGuane and Alice Munro. "The Tao of Travel" by Paul Theroux
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The Sisters Brothers, By Patrick deWitt - The Independent
Google News - almost 6 years
Another obvious writer is Thomas McGuane; DeWitt is absolutely nothing like him. McGuane uses the genre to explore the everyday anxieties of American life, but DeWitt is concerned with the immutable characteristics of human nature
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Editors' Choice: Recent books of particular interest
NYTimes - over 6 years
DRIVING ON THE RIM, by Thomas McGuane (Knopf, $26.95.) The rambling plot of McGuane's novel is held together by its pleasurable, acutely observed episodes, and by the sardonic Montana doctor at its center, sympathetic in his dissociated journey. DJIBOUTI, by Elmore Leonard (Morrow/HarperCollins, $26.99.) Leonard's heroine, a New Orleanian in the
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NYTimes article
On the Mend
NYTimes - over 6 years
DRIVING ON THE RIM By Thomas McGuane 306 pp. Alfred A. Knopf. $26.95 The narrator of Thomas McGuane's new novel, ''Driving on the Rim,'' is a Montana doctor who was given the name Irving Berlin Pickett by his patriotic, evangelical mother, after the writer of ''God Bless America.'' Berl, as he's known, describes himself as ''irritable,
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NYTimes article
An Author Still Writing His Way Through Big Sky Country
NYTimes - over 6 years
McLEOD, Mont. -- Thomas McGuane, whose new novel, ''Driving on the Rim,'' comes out on Thursday, is the only member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters who is also in the National Cutting Horse Association Hall of Fame. Yet he claims not to be a real rancher. ''All the ranchers I know have had back surgery, operations on their rotator
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NYTimes article
BOOKS; 'Deliverance': A Dark Heart Still Beating
NYTimes - over 6 years
On the page and off, James Dickey (1923-1997) was a maximalist. His roomy, loquacious poems spill down the page in a waterfall style and in a voice he called ''country surrealism.'' It makes sense that he called some of these poems ''walls of words,'' similar to the record producer Phil Spector's echoing ''wall of sound.'' Dickey's music, rougher
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NYTimes article
Elliott Kastner, 80, Dies; Produced Literary Films
NYTimes - over 6 years
Elliott Kastner, a producer whose affinity for literary writers and man's-man movie stars resulted in films like ''Harper,''''Where Eagles Dare,''''The Long Goodbye,''''The Missouri Breaks'' and ''Equus,'' died on Wednesday in London, where he had lived and worked for many years. He was 80. The cause was cancer, his stepson Cassian Elwes said. Mr.
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Prehistoric Creatures Under Big Sky
NYTimes - over 7 years
WE had driven all morning to the eastern seam of Montana, a part of this large state so close to North Dakota that even Montanans consider it pretty much the middle of nowhere. Around us sunburned young men in cutoff T-shirts and camouflage swim trunks were emerging from the brown water of the Yellowstone River holding prehistoric monsters with
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NYTimes article
ESSAY; Play It Again. And Again.
NYTimes - almost 8 years
For the past few years, whenever I've found myself down in the dumps, I have turned to books that contain the word ''piano'' in the title. Immediately, the dark clouds fade. Whether the book is''The Piano Tuner,'' ''The Pianist,'' ''The Piano Lesson,'' ''The Pianoplayers,'' any one of three recent novels called ''The Piano Teacher'' or even just
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Thomas McGuane
    THIRTIES
  • 1978
    Age 38
    McGuane published his most autobiographical novel, Panama, in 1978.
    More Details Hide Details His first and, until Driving on the Rim (2010), only novel written in the first person, it is the story of a flash-in-the-pan rock star named Chet Pomeroy who suffers delusion after delusion and can only imagine salvation in the character of Catherine, a literary embodiment of McGuane’s feelings toward his third wife, Laurie Buffett, sister of Jimmy Buffett, one of McGuane’s Key West comrades. With the exception of positive reviews in The New Yorker and the Village Voice, the novel was mercilessly panned by critics as self-absorbed and a testament to wasted literary talent – notwithstanding McGuane’s protests that he considered it his best novel and that he was intentionally creating a lugubrious character who was not entitled, in the common view, to his feelings of loss and depression. An ongoing struggle has ensued between McGuane and his reviewers concerning their expectations for his fiction, and their sense of how much McGuane-the-celebrity was intruding upon his work. The upheaval of the period concluded with the deaths of McGuane’s father, mother, and sister in the span of 30 months, and by McGuane’s admission that he felt no desire to author a comic novel like any of his first three works.
  • 1971
    Age 31
    His second novel, The Bushwhacked Piano, a picaresque comedy chronicling the romantic, sporting, and entrepreneurial hijinks of Nicholas Payne, traipsing from Michigan to Montana to Florida and sprinkled with wry commentary on the current state of America throughout, appeared in 1971 to rave reviews.
    More Details Hide Details Jonathan Yardley in the New York Times hailed the 31-year-old McGuane as “a talent of Faulknerian potential,” and Saul Bellow described McGuane as “a language star.” The novel won the Rosenthal Award of the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters. McGuane’s third novel, Ninety-Two in the Shade (1973), was received as continued confirmation of his potential and is perhaps his best known, or at least his most widely acclaimed in literary circles. Shoving off with the ominous invocation, “Nobody knows, from sea to shining sea, why we are having all this trouble with our republic,” the novel utilizes young Thomas Skelton’s desire to be a Key West fishing guide as a foil for numerous expressions of word-drunk cultural, familial, and macho angst, culminating in the death of Skelton at the business end of rival guide Nichol Dance’s pistol.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1958
    Age 18
    McGuane was born in Wyandotte, Michigan, the son of upwardly mobile Irish Catholic parents who moved to the Midwest from Massachusetts. His primary education included boarding school at Cranbrook School in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, from which he graduated in 1958, but also included work on a ranch in Wyoming, ubiquitous fishing and hunting, and a difficult relationship with his alcoholic father that would later shadow much of his fiction.
    More Details Hide Details McGuane prefers to consider his roots matrilineal, on which side he is descended from a rich storytelling clan. He envisioned himself as a writer from a very young age, admiring what he perceived as the adventurous life of a writer as much as the prospect of writing. When he was ten years old, he got into a physical altercation with a friend over differing descriptions of a sunset. He began a serious devotion to writing by the age of 16. He attended Michigan State University (B.A., 1962, English), where he met his lifelong friend Jim Harrison. At Yale University (M.F.A., 1965), he studied playwriting and dramatic literature, and a Wallace Stegner Fellowship to Stanford University (1966–67) provided him the time and resources to finish his first published novel, The Sporting Club (published in 1969 with the assistance of Harrison). The Sporting Club is an anarchic portrayal of aristocratic decline and eventual ruin at an elite Michigan outdoor club. McGuane wrote the novel in a frenetic six weeks after his initial hopes for a published novel in The Dial were dashed by its editor at the time, E. L. Doctorow.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1939
    Born
    Born on December 11, 1939.
    More Details Hide Details
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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