Thomas Wolfe
American writer
Thomas Wolfe
Thomas Clayton Wolfe was a major American novelist of the early 20th century. Wolfe wrote four lengthy novels, plus many short stories, dramatic works and novellas. He is known for mixing highly original, poetic, rhapsodic, and impressionistic prose with autobiographical writing.
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Thomas Wolfe's personal information overview.
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BOOKS OF THE TIMES; ‘Life Itself’ by Roger Ebert - Review
NYTimes - over 5 years
Roger Ebert , the only film critic with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, has written more than a dozen books about movies. He has also written one about “the mystery and romance of the rice cooker.” And he presides over what may be the most industrious blog in all of moviedom, rogerebert.com, which is packed with news, reviews and
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NYTimes article
Asheville is a lively Blue Ridge Mountain gem - TheChronicleHerald.ca
Google News - over 5 years
Cultural sites include the boardinghouse where author Thomas Wolfe lived; once run by his mother, the restored yellow Victorian building is open for tours daily except Monday; 52 N. Market St., www.wolfememorial.com/ or 828-253-8304
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Google News article
A Poet's Education - Durham Herald Sun
Google News - over 5 years
Chapel Hill — When North Carolina novelist Thomas Wolfe wrote, he set out to unfurl on the pages of his ledgers what his second novel “Of Time and the River” called the “strange and bitter miracle of life
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Lively Asheville Is 'Berkeley of the Blue Ridge' - ABC News
Google News - over 5 years
Cultural sites include the boardinghouse where author Thomas Wolfe lived; once run by his mother, the restored yellow Victorian building is open for tours daily except Monday; 52 N. Market St., http://www.wolfememorial.com/ or 828-253-8304
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Google News article
NEA leader, NC values - News & Observer
Google News - over 5 years
WASHINGTON -- Most North Carolina students are familiar with native son Thomas Wolfe's novel, "You Can't Go Home Again." The title has become a popular adage in American culture, even among people who haven't read the book
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Google News article
Can't go there: Valley Views - Plain Dealer (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
By Joan Rusek, Sun News You can't go home again, Thomas Wolfe, wrote before he took ill and died in 1938. Wolfe had his reasons, as I have mine. The North Carolina author frequently included fragments of his native Asheville in his books
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Peny County Opera House to feature art of Tom Wolfe - Zanesville Times Recorder
Google News - over 5 years
NEW LEXINGTON -- The Perry County Opera House and Cultural Arts Center (PCOHACAC) will kick off a Third Sunday Fall Art Series on Sunday featuring as its first artist Thomas Wolfe, of Junction City. Wolfe's work will be featured from 1 to 5 pm Sunday
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Google News article
A desire left unfulfilled - Boston Globe
Google News - over 5 years
The unfinished novel, the boffo final story, and the unwritten memoir loom especially large when the writer dies young; and so the careers of artists such as Edgar Allan Poe, Jack London, Thomas Wolfe, Flannery O'Connor, and our subject here,
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Google News article
Jacksonville native Jason Spitz liked Jaguars over other options - Florida Times-Union
Google News - over 5 years
By Vito Stellino Guard Jason Spitz is proving Thomas Wolfe wrong: He's showing you can go home again. The Bolles graduate, who starred at Louisville for four seasons and then spent five years with the Green Bay Packers after being drafted in the third
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Google News article
Mike Modano: “I think that was the swan song” - msnbc.com
Google News - over 5 years
Thomas Wolfe would be proud. This time last season, there was a bit of a bidding war between the Detroit Red Wings and San Jose Sharks for the 20-year veteran's services. When Detroit acquired his services, it seemed like the quintessential Red Wings
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Google News article
Hot shows in the Asheville area - Asheville Citizen-Times
Google News - over 5 years
Fleet Foxes, 8 pm Oct. 4, Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. $35 at the Civic Center box office and www.ticketmaster.com Natalie Grant and Jeff Allen, today, Biltmore Estate South Terrace. www.biltmore.com Michael W. Smith, Saturday, Biltmore Estate South
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Google News article
HAWKINS: It appears you can go home again - Odessa American
Google News - over 5 years
In the 1940 novel “You Can't Go Home Again,” Thomas Wolfe contends that when you leave your hometown for bigger and better things, it is impossible to return, and you darn sure better know you can't relive your glory days or those
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Learn about the tour of The Thomas Wolfe Memorial on Aug. 13 - Mountain Xpress (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Here in Asheville, the “Old Kentucky Home”, known today as the Thomas Wolfe Memorial, possesses dozens of pieces of original furniture that date from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. After a devastating fire in July 1998, much of the furniture
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Google News article
Fleet Foxes announce they'll play Asheville's Thomas Wolfe Auditorium - Mountain Xpress
Google News - over 5 years
Headlining the Thomas Wolfe Auditorium a long way from an opening slot at the Grey Eagle — which is what Fleet Foxes were doing last time they were Asheville. As Xpress photographer Rich Orris reminds us, that was March,
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Google News article
DELMARVA MOMS: Going home allows new perspective - Delmarva Daily Times
Google News - over 5 years
It was Thomas Wolfe who said “You can't go home again.” He had a point; things are never the same once you leave and come back. Although it's a wistful statement, I think there is a bit of good that can be said for coming back home with a different
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Review: Costello spins gold at Wolfe Auditorium show - News Record and Sentinel
Google News - over 5 years
Elvis Costello performs Tuesday night at the Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. 7/19/11 / John Coutlakis / jcoutlakis@citizen-times.com ASHEVILLE — If the music game ever goes sour for Elvis Costello, the singer could probably find a whole new career as a game
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Thomas Wolfe
    THIRTIES
  • 1938
    Age 37
    In 1938, after submitting over one million words of manuscript to his new editor, Edward Aswell, Wolfe left New York for a tour of the West.
    More Details Hide Details On the way, he stopped at Purdue University and gave a lecture, "Writing and Living," and then spent two weeks traveling through 11 national parks in the West, the only part of the country he had never visited. Wolfe wrote to Aswell that while he had focused on his family in his previous writing, he would now take a more global perspective. In July, Wolfe became ill with pneumonia while visiting Seattle, spending three weeks in the hospital there. His sister Mabel closed her boardinghouse in Washington, D.C. and went to Seattle to care for him. Complications arose, and Wolfe was eventually diagnosed with miliary tuberculosis of the brain. On September 6, he was sent to Baltimore's Johns Hopkins Hospital for treatment by the most famous neurosurgeon in the country, Dr. Walter Dandy, but an operation revealed that the disease had overrun the entire right side of his brain. Without regaining consciousness, he died 18 days before his 38th birthday. His last writing, a journal of his two-week trip through the national parks, was found among his belongings hours after his death.
  • 1937
    Age 36
    Wolfe returned to Asheville in the summer of 1937 for the first time since publication of his first book.
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    In 1937, Chickamauga, his short story set during the US Civil War battle of the same name, was published.
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  • 1936
    Age 35
    Wolfe spent much time in Europe and was especially popular and at ease in Germany, where he made many friends. However, in 1936 he witnessed incidents of discrimination against the Jews, which upset him and changed his mind about the political developments in the country.
    More Details Hide Details He returned to America and published a story based on his observations ("I Have a Thing to Tell You") in The New Republic. Following its publication, Wolfe's books were banned by the German government, and he was prohibited from traveling there.
  • 1934
    Age 33
    In 1934, Maxim Lieber served as his literary agent.
    More Details Hide Details Wolfe was persuaded by Edward Aswell to leave Scribner's and sign with Harper & Brothers. By some accounts, Perkins' severe editing of Wolfe's work is what prompted him to leave. Others describe his growing resentment that some people attributed his success to Perkins' work as editor. In 1936, Bernard DeVoto, reviewing The Story of a Novel for Saturday Review, wrote that Look Homeward, Angel was "hacked and shaped and compressed into something resembling a novel by Mr. Perkins and the assembly-line at Scribners."
  • TWENTIES
  • 1926
    Age 25
    Wolfe returned to Europe in the summer of 1926 and began writing the first version of an autobiographical novel entitled O Lost.
    More Details Hide Details The narrative, which evolved into Look Homeward, Angel, fictionalized his early experiences in Asheville, and chronicled family, friends, and the boarders at his mother's establishment on Spruce Street. In the book, he renamed the town Altamont and called the boarding house "Dixieland." His family's surname became Gant, and Wolfe called himself Eugene, his father Oliver, and his mother Eliza. The original manuscript of O Lost was over 1100 pages (333,000 words) long, and considerably more experimental in style than the final version of Look Homeward, Angel. It was submitted to Scribner's, where the editing was done by Maxwell Perkins, the most prominent book editor of the time, who also worked with Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald. He cut the book to focus more on the character of Eugene, a stand-in for Wolfe. Wolfe initially expressed gratitude to Perkins for his disciplined editing, but he had misgivings later. It has been said that Wolfe found a father figure in Perkins, and that Perkins, who had five daughters, found in Wolfe a sort of foster son.
  • 1925
    Age 24
    In October 1925, she and Wolfe became lovers and remained so for five years.
    More Details Hide Details Their affair was turbulent and sometimes combative, but she exerted a powerful influence, encouraging and funding his writing.
    On his return voyage in 1925, he met Aline Bernstein (1882–1955), a scene designer for the Theatre Guild.
    More Details Hide Details Eighteen years his senior, she was married to a successful stockbroker with whom she had two children.
  • 1924
    Age 23
    He sailed to Europe in October 1924 to continue writing.
    More Details Hide Details From England he traveled to France, Italy and Switzerland.
    In February 1924, he began teaching English as an instructor at New York University (NYU), a position he occupied periodically for almost seven years.
    More Details Hide Details Wolfe was unable to sell any of his plays after three years because of their great length. The Theatre Guild came close to producing Welcome to Our City before ultimately rejecting it, and Wolfe found his writing style more suited to fiction than the stage.
  • 1923
    Age 22
    Wolfe visited New York City again in November 1923 and solicited funds for UNC, while trying to sell his plays to Broadway.
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    Wolfe continued to study for another year with Baker in the 47 Workshop, which produced his ten-scene play Welcome to Our City in May 1923.
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  • 1922
    Age 21
    In 1922, Wolfe received his master's degree from Harvard.
    More Details Hide Details His father died in Asheville in June of that year, an event that would strongly influence his writing.
  • 1921
    Age 20
    Two versions of his play The Mountains were performed by Baker's 47 Workshop in 1921.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1920
    Age 19
    Wolfe graduated from UNC with a B.A. in June 1920.
    More Details Hide Details In September of that year, he entered the Graduate School for Arts and Sciences at Harvard University, where he studied playwriting under George Pierce Baker.
  • 1919
    Age 18
    Another of his plays, The Third Night, was performed by the Playmakers in December 1919.
    More Details Hide Details Wolfe was inducted into the Golden Fleece honor society.
    Aspiring to be a playwright, in 1919 Wolfe enrolled in a playwriting course.
    More Details Hide Details His one-act play, The Return of Buck Gavin, was performed by the newly formed Carolina Playmakers, then composed of classmates in Frederick Koch's playwriting class, with Wolfe acting the title role. He edited UNC's student newspaper The Daily Tar Heel and won the Worth Prize for Philosophy for an essay titled The Crisis in Industry.
  • 1916
    Age 15
    Wolfe lived in the boarding house on Spruce Street until he went to college in 1916.
    More Details Hide Details It is now the Thomas Wolfe Memorial. Wolfe was closest to his brother Ben, whose early death at age 26 is chronicled in Look Homeward, Angel. Julia Wolfe bought and sold many properties, eventually becoming a successful real estate speculator. Wolfe began to study at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) when he was 15 years old. A member of the Dialectic Society and Pi Kappa Phi fraternity, he predicted that his portrait would one day hang in New West near that of celebrated North Carolina governor Zebulon Vance, which it does today.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1906
    Age 5
    In 1906 Julia Wolfe bought a boarding house named "Old Kentucky Home" at nearby 48 Spruce Street in Asheville, taking up residence there with her youngest son while the rest of the family remained at the Woodfin Street residence.
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  • 1900
    Born
    Born on October 3, 1900.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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