Tim Richmond
American stock car racing driver
Tim Richmond
Tim Richmond was an American race car driver from Ashland, Ohio. He competed in IndyCar racing before transferring to NASCAR's Winston Cup Series. Richmond was one of the first drivers to change from open wheel racing to NASCAR stock cars full-time, which has since become an industry trend. He won the 1980 Indianapolis 500 Rookie of the Year award and had 13 victories during eight NASCAR seasons.
Biography
Tim Richmond's personal information overview.
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Come wish Mike Grenier a happy retirement next Thursday - The Salem News
Google News - over 5 years
Salem — Cameron Darmody, Sr.; Tim Richmond, Jr.; Kyle Gauthier, Sr. Nick McLaughlin is close to committing to one of the Division 1 colleges after him for his golf talents. Yet even he is in awe of some of the things he sees from St. John's Prep
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Tom Cruise Takes Ride in Red Bull F1 Machine - Inside Line
Google News - over 5 years
Cruise, fresh from the success of his role as a Navy jet fighter pilot in Top Gun in 1986, starred in a Paramount film based loosely on NASCAR characters Tim Richmond, Harry Hyde and Rick Hendrick. Cruise's character, named Cole Trickle,
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Michigan International Speedway - AthlonSports.com
Google News - over 5 years
A hard-charging Tim Richmond falls from second to fifth late in the race after confusion over when a caution is displayed. Richmond races back to second after the restart but is not able to run Elliott down on the last lap. The race is also notable in
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In the cockpit with racing superstar Carl Edwards on eve of Aug 20 Montreal ... - Montreal Gazette (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
I'm not surprised Darling is treated this way considering the God-awful homophobic reaction to the news that racer Tim Richmond – one of the first drivers to switch from open-wheel racing to stock-car racing – died of AIDS back in August 1989,
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Sharon Triathlon Ends In A New York Minute - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
Max Performance Race Director Tim Richmond said more than 100 beginner triathletes participated Sunday. "You guys are going to have a great race," he said. Richmond told the crowd that the run featured "a beautiful shady course all around the lake
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Tim Richmond; 22 Years Later and Still Not Forgotten - SpeedwayMedia.com (press release)
Google News - over 5 years
Tim Richmond was a lot different since he did not grow up with racing in his blood, and did not come from the hard working middle class lifestyle that most of NASCAR's big names came from. Instead Richmond was born into wealth, and because of this,
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A happy birthday, and a sad goodbye - Lexington Herald Leader
Google News - over 5 years
It was during that weekend that some of us involved with stock car racing first saw SERIOUS signs that colorful, flamboyant, superstar driver Tim Richmond was ill far beyond the “cold” that had been claimed. On Aug. 8 of '87, a Saturday,
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Sharon Triathlon Seeks Volunteers' Aid - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
More volunteers are needed for Sunday's swim, bike and run at Lake Massapoag, says Max Performance Race Director Tim Richmond. All volunteers can raise money for their cause, and receive a technical race shirt, he says
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Q&A with Kenny Francis: Same driver, new home is best of both worlds - Florida Times-Union
Google News - over 5 years
[Tim] Richmond was driving it and I used to watch it on TV and think “man that would be cool to be associated with that one day.” And then as the company has grown it has become the preeminent company in this sport, so it's really just an honor to be
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NASCAR: Kenseth and Biffle lead Brickyard 400 practice at Indianapolis - AutoWeek
Google News - over 5 years
5 and [Tim] Richmond was driving it, and I used to watch on TV and think 'man that would be cool to be associated with that one day.' Then the company grew and became the preeminent company in this sport, so it's really an honor to be associated with
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2011 ARCA: Gresham Hopes To Have Winning Plan - PaddockTalk
Google News - over 5 years
In his previous eight career ARCA races, Gresham has one win – the Tim Richmond Memorial 200 at Mansfield Speedway (7//17/2010) - and four top-10 finishes. This will be his fourth start of the 2011 season with Venturini Motorsports, his best finish a
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Flashback: In '71, the inaugural LARC all-star football game drew 11000 - Allentown Morning Call
Google News - over 5 years
Hamlin is the first to win the two summer Pocono races from the pole in the same season, and the sixth driver to sweep the two races, joining Jimmie Johnson, Bobby Labonte, Bill Elliott, Bobby Allison and Tim Richmond. 1991 — Ray Buss, the state's
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In '66, Billie Jean King won exhibition at Saucon Valley - Allentown Morning Call
Google News - over 5 years
1986 — Fog shortens the Summer 500 at Pocono International Raceway to 375 miles, leading to a wild finish when Tim Richmond edges Ricky Rudd and Geoff Bodine by a foot. Race officials informed the drivers after 140 laps that the race would be
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Williams: Product Wars Still Percolating In NASCAR - RacinToday.com
Google News - over 5 years
Driver Tim Richmond and owner Rick Hendrick were key players in NASCAR's coffee wars back in the 1980s. Looks like razor wars are now upon us. (Photo courtesy of NASCAR) By Deb Williams | Senior Writer With Schick's entrance into NASCAR's Sprint Cup
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Kite to Run Milwaukee for Legendary Sachs Family - WhoWon.com (press release)
Google News - over 5 years
To Sachs, 25 was used by his father at Indianapolis and, to Kite, as a reminder of his racing hero Tim Richmond. Saturday's 7:30pm (CDT) race, held in conjunction with the IZOD IndyCar Series, is Kite's first Silver Crown race since 2005
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Who deserves a spot in NASCAR's 2013 Hall of Fame class? - SI.com
Google News - over 5 years
He had 56 victories and was the crew chief for Bobby Isaac's 1970 championship. Hyde joined Rick Hendrick's new team in 1984 and was crew chief during Tim Richmond's seven-win season in 1987. The Harry Hogge character in the movie Days of Thunder was
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Tim Richmond
    THIRTIES
  • 1989
    Age 33
    On August 13, 1989, Richmond died at the age of 34, about two years after his final NASCAR race.
    More Details Hide Details He was buried in Ashland, Ohio.
    ESPN sent a get-well-soon card to Richmond when it aired the July 1989 NASCAR race at Pocono.
    More Details Hide Details The television network showed highlights of Richmond's victory at the track from 1986. "Tim had Hollywood good looks and the charisma of Tom Cruise," said his friend Dr. Jerry Punch. "There he was in victory lane with the team all around him and beauty queens hanging all over him. It was important for the people at the hospital to see Tim the way he really was, when he was healthy and handsome and vital, not the way he was as they saw him every day in the hospital."
  • 1988
    Age 32
    A series of drug tests and falsely reported positive results shortly before the 1988 Daytona 500 kept Richmond from driving in what was to have been his last big race ", the report said.
    More Details Hide Details The New York Times published the findings. While neither Tennant nor NASCAR supplied an official response at the time, NASCAR did confirm that they were seeking to replace Tennant. The Ashland County Sports Hall of Fame inducted Richmond in their second class in 1996. In 1998, NASCAR named Richmond one of its 50 greatest drivers of all time. He was inducted into the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in 2002. The Mansfield Motorsports Park ARCA Re/Max Series race in 2009 was named the Tim Richmond Memorial ARCA Re/Max 250 in honor of the area native. The race at Mansfield was co-promoted by Mattioli's son Joseph Mattioli III. The documentary film Tim Richmond: To The Limit was produced as part of ESPN's 30 for 30 series with a premiere date of October 19, 2010. key) (Bold – Pole position awarded by qualifying time. Italics – Pole position earned by points standings or practice time. * – Most laps led.)
    Baskin reported that sealed court documents and interviews showed Tennant and NASCAR used "allegedly false drug-test results in 1988 to bar Richmond from racing".
    More Details Hide Details Baskin also stated that NASCAR had targeted Richmond, requesting that Tennant establish a substance-abuse policy with Richmond in mind.
    In his final public appearance in February 1988, Richmond denied that he abused drugs and said that a mistake had been made in his drug test.
    More Details Hide Details His suit with NASCAR was settled out-of-court, the terms sealed. Richmond withdrew into his condo in Florida. There were by then rumors of HIV and AIDS, which he denied. He was later hospitalized in West Palm Beach.
    In April 1988, Richmond sued NASCAR over the suspension.
    More Details Hide Details Although he retested later that year and was reinstated, he could not find a car to drive.
    Although Richmond attempted a comeback in 1988, NASCAR suspended him for testing positive for banned substances.
    More Details Hide Details The substances were identified as Sudafed, a non-prescription over-the-counter allergy medication, and Advil, an over-the-counter pain reliever.
  • 1987
    Age 31
    He resigned from Hendrick Motorsports in September 1987.
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    Richmond earned a victory in the next race at Riverside, and made his final 1987 start at Michigan International Speedway's Champion Spark Plug 400 that August, finishing 29th with a blown engine.
    More Details Hide Details
    He was not well enough to begin the 1987 NASCAR season despite lengthy hospitalization in Cleveland and further rest at home; when Richmond missed the Daytona 500, his condition was reported as double pneumonia.
    More Details Hide Details Media later reported that he had tested positive for acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). He returned to Pocono for the Miller High Life 500 during the middle of the year. Starting third, he led by the fifth lap and ultimately led 82 laps, including the final 46, to win the race by eight car-lengths over Bill Elliott. In the middle of the race, Richmond's car suffered gearbox problems. Because he could use only fourth (high) gear, he had to use that gear to slowly exit the pits. Richmond was emotional after the victory, saying, "I had tears in my eyes when I took the checkered flag. Then every time anyone congratulated me, I started bawling again."
  • 1986
    Age 30
    Richmond fell ill the day after the 1986 NASCAR annual banquet during a promotional trip to New York City.
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    He had a career-best third-place finish in points after winning seven events in 1986, in what was his last full NASCAR season.
    More Details Hide Details
    Richmond had suffered a 64-race winless streak that was finally broken at the Van Scoy Diamond Mine 500 at Pocono in June 1986.
    More Details Hide Details After two straight second-place finishes at Charlotte and Riverside, Richmond started the Pocono event in third place inside the second row. That race saw a caution for rain with five laps left before the halfway point. NASCAR wanted the cars to get to the halfway point to make the race official, so the sanctioning body had the drivers slowly circle the track. It took the drivers 26 minutes to complete the laps, and the rain was so heavy that some drivers had to look out their side windows because they could not see out their windshields. Two hours later, the track had dried and the race resumed with Richmond in third. After Richmond's car was adjusted to remove the "push", the car was more to his liking. Because his radio did not work, he was unable to communicate with his crew chief, Hyde, and he made his final pit stop with 37 laps left. Hyde worried that Richmond had stopped a lap too early to ensure that he would have enough fuel to make it to the end. After Richmond took the lead with 30 laps left in the race, Dale Earnhardt made up three seconds on Richmond's five-second lead. With four laps to go, Buddy Arrington spun in a three-car accident. The remaining laps of the race where completed slowly under caution and Richmond took the checkered flag for the victory. He had led 97 laps, including the final 30, taking his first victory in a Rick Hendrick car.
    Richmond joined Hendrick Motorsports in 1986, where he teamed up with veteran crew chief Harry Hyde.
    More Details Hide Details It took the team until the middle of the season to gel.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1985
    Age 29
    In 1985, the final season that Richmond competed for Beadle, his best finish was a second-place run at Bristol.
    More Details Hide Details He ended the season 11th in points with 13 Top 10s in 28 races. In the Busch Series, he qualified at the pole position in the two races he entered, and won the Charlotte race.
  • 1984
    Age 28
    Richmond finished the 1984 season 12th in points, with 11 finishes in the top 10 and in six in the top 5.
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    Esquire magazine named Richmond as one of "the best of the new generation" in 1984.
    More Details Hide Details That year he had one win at North Wilkesboro Speedway and second-place finishes at Dover, Darlington and Riverside.
  • 1983
    Age 27
    In 1983, Richmond began racing for Raymond Beadle whom he had known before he started racing.
    More Details Hide Details He returned to the three-cornered Pocono racetrack, earning his first oval victory. During the season, he accumulated four pole positions (Darlington, Pocono, Charlotte, and Atlanta), one win (Pocono), and fifteen top 10s on his way to finishing tenth in season points. He made his first appearance in a NASCAR Busch Series (now Nationwide Series) car, but did not finish any of the three races he entered that season.
  • 1982
    Age 26
    Richmond started 1982 without a ride before getting a one-race deal to drive for Billie Harvey at the Rockingham track.
    More Details Hide Details Richmond completed 112 laps of the 492-lap event to finish 31st, retiring from the race with engine problems. For the following event, Richmond was hired to drive J.D. Stacy's No. 2 car. In his first race for the team, Richmond earned his first career top 5 finish when he placed fifth at Darlington Raceway. Returning to Pocono, he finished second, before winning his first race on the road course at Riverside, California the following week. Later that season, he earned his first pole position at Bristol. The tour returned to Riverside for the final race of the season where Richmond won his second race, sweeping both events at the track. Benny Parsons said that "watching Richmond go through the Esses was unbelievable". For the season, Richmond had twelve top 10s, two wins, and one pole to finish 26th in points.
  • 1981
    Age 25
    Richmond raced for three teams in 1981.
    More Details Hide Details He started the season by competing in 15 events for Ulrich. He had his first career top 10 finish, taking sixth place at Talladega Superspeedway, soon followed by a seventh-place finish at Texas World Speedway. After Kennie Childers hired him away from Ulrich mid-season, Richmond had top 10 finishes at Pocono and Bristol. For the final seven races of the season, he drove for Bob Rogers and had a top 10 finish at Dover International Speedway. Overall for the season, Richmond had six top 10 finishes to place 16th in season points.
  • 1980
    Age 24
    Overall, he finished the 1980 season 41st in points.
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    He debuted at the Coca-Cola 500 at Pocono on July 27, 1980, finishing 12th in a D. K. Ulrich-owned Chevrolet.
    More Details Hide Details That season, he competed in five events, with two DNFs (did not finish) and three 12th-place finishes.
    He was named the 1980 Indianapolis 500 Rookie of the Year. "I busted up a few Indy cars right after that," he said. "Milwaukee, Mid-Ohio... at Michigan I cut one in two.
    More Details Hide Details I was afraid my racing career would come to a halt. So when I got an offer to drive stock cars, I took it, and it turned out I liked driving them better." Pocono Raceway President Joseph Mattioli III convinced Richmond to make the change to stock car racing on the NASCAR circuit. Richmond made his first NASCAR start two months after winning the Indianapolis 500 Rookie of the Year award.
    During practice for the 1980 Indianapolis 500, Richmond set the fastest unofficial practice speed of the month, besting even race favorite Johnny Rutherford in the vaunted Chaparral.
    More Details Hide Details His hopes for the pole were dashed with a crash in morning practice on the first day of qualifying. After repairs he qualified 19th for the race. He worked his way up to the top 10 during the race, led a lap, and finished ninth as he ran out of fuel at the end of the race. To the delight of the crowd, winner Rutherford gave him a ride back to the pits.
  • 1979
    Age 23
    Richmond's father bought an Eagle Indy Car chassis and an Offenhauser engine for the 1979 race at Michigan International Speedway.
    More Details Hide Details Richmond qualified 21st fastest with a lap, significantly slower than Bobby Unser's pole position speed. The race ended for him when his motor blew up on the fourth lap, and he finished last (23rd). Owner Pat Santello was looking for a driver to replace Larry Rice for his CART team at the following race at Watkins Glen International, so he gave Richmond a test at Willow Springs Raceway where he had previously set the student record. Santello hired Richmond, who then qualified 15th fastest for the event and finished in eighth place, the best of his IndyCar career. Richmond raced in three more events that season.
  • 1978
    Age 22
    Richmond raced in a 1978 Mini Indy car event at Phoenix International Raceway, winning the Formula Super Vee support event in a Lola T620.
    More Details Hide Details The win attracted sponsors and attention from major owners like Roger Penske. He also competed in USAC's Silver Crown series.
    Richmond returned to racing sprint cars in the United States Automobile Club's (USAC) national sprint car tour in 1978.
    More Details Hide Details Competing in 12 races, he finished 30th in points as the series' Rookie of the Year. That year he attended Jim Russell's road racing school at Willow Springs International Motorsports Park, setting a student course record.
  • 1977
    Age 21
    In 1977 Tim Richmond became both Sandusky Speedway's Rookie of the Year and the SuperModified class track champion.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1976
    Age 20
    A friend of Richmond's father co-owned a sprint car and Richmond joined the team as a crew member for Dave Shoemaker. In 1976, 21-year-old Richmond took the car onto Lakeville Speedway at Lakeville, Ohio for some practice laps. "Somebody put a stopwatch on me," Richmond said. "I was running laps faster than Dave had been.
    More Details Hide Details It was the first time I had ever driven a race car." Richmond and his father found a red, white and blue-colored No. 98 car in Pennsylvania, which was the same number and paint scheme that Richmond used on model cars as a child. In his first competition at the track, officials placed Richmond in the slowest heat. He passed several cars before spinning out and breaking an axle. Although he made several attempts to get the car pointed in the right direction, the broken axle prevented the car from driving straight. After being towed to the pits, he parked the car for the rest of the event. Later that season, they towed the car to Eldora Speedway, only to have Richmond crash the car again. In response, Richmond's father fired him as the driver. The next season, Al Richmond bought a SuperModified better suited to his son's driving style.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1955
    Born
    Born in 1955.
    More Details Hide Details
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