Tommy Dorsey
American big band leader and musician
Tommy Dorsey
Thomas Francis "Tommy" Dorsey, Jr. was an American jazz trombonist, trumpeter, composer, and bandleader of the Big Band era. He was known as "The Sentimental Gentleman of Swing", due to his smooth-toned trombone playing. Although he was not known for being a notable soloist, his technicality with the trombone gave him renown amongst other musicians. He was vastly admired by other musicians, however, for his technical skill on his instrument.
Biography
Tommy Dorsey's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Tommy Dorsey
News
News abour Tommy Dorsey from around the web
Steve Falcone: Big band music dead? Not in Reno - Reno Gazette-Journal
Google News - over 5 years
If you thought the Big Band Era died when Frank Sinatra quit the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra, you weren't on the roof of the Nevada Museum of Art last Saturday. On a perfect Truckee Meadows evening, with a gorgeous pink-and-blue Sierra sunset as background,
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Apple Festival welcomes Buddy K band - BlueRidgeNow.com
Google News - over 5 years
"Tommy Dorsey was quite a player!" The BKBB features trumpeters Gordon Roberts, Bob Bastien, Sandra Travis, and Russ Senna; trombonists Jerry Zinc, Bill Pace, Paul Nau and Kraus; saxophonists Jim Meadows, John Caldemeyer, Marilyn Campbell, Tom Ward,
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Steve Cooper presents 'Big band Memories' - TribLocal
Google News - over 5 years
Rare clips of swing bands include Glenn Miller, Harry James, Bob Crosby, Tommy Dorsey, Count Basie and many others. Many sweet bands are also featured – Eddie Howard, Vaughn Monroe Freddy Martin and a rare appearance by Ina Rae Hutton and her All-Girl
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Walt Wilkins keeps having fun - San Antonio Express
Google News - over 5 years
He met my mom and took her to a Tommy Dorsey dance,†he said. “My dad had a great record collection. He loved Glen Campbell. He also had a lot of Merle Haggard, Bob Wills, Patti Page. When I was growing up I had a neighbor, Larry; he taught me how
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Group pitches Flagstaff Mountain project to local leaders - Allentown Morning Call
Google News - over 5 years
It has hosted countless wedding receptions, events and acts,, including Tommy Dorsey's big band orchestra. Flagstaff Resort Land Holdings, which includes Flagstaff Ballroom owner Tim Markley and Ocean City, New Jersey, developer Larry Masi of Dominion
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Big Band records lie with B17 bomber - Inishowen News
Google News - over 5 years
A STASH of rare 120 Tommy Dorsey records evoking the wartime Big Band era would be music to the decompressed ears of scuba divers searching for them on the wreck of a B17 bomber in Co Donegal. The vinyl records by the American
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Whiskey, cigs and a crash - Derry Today
Google News - over 5 years
Following on from this 'Journal' reporter Katie Barr, visited the resting place of much of the plane artefacts, to speak with members of the club and learn more about the plane, its story and Tommy Dorsey.... On 11th September 1942, an American B17
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Frankovelgia to dazzle residents - Morris Daily Herald
Google News - over 5 years
She also was a singer with the Sammy Kaye Orchestra, the Glenn Miller Band, the Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra, and the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra and more. Based in Hawaii for a time, Frankovelgia moved back to Illinois. “I began working specifically for seniors,
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Lynn Roberts returns to Xavier stage Sept. 11 - Cincinnati.com
Google News - over 5 years
11, singing from the songbook of the great Tommy Dorsey. Dorsey gave Roberts her chance at stardom by asking her to perform with his band when she was still a teenager. She has sung with other Hall of Fame leaders including Charlie Spivak,
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WHEN SWING WAS KING - Gather.com
Google News - over 5 years
Between the rhythm and orchestration, it makes for some of the best dance music around, particularly Glenn Miller, Artie Shaw, Jimmy and Tommy Dorsey, Gene Kruppa, and many others. My personal favorite is "Sing, Sing, Sing" by Bennie Goodman;
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Swing City Big Band Brings Popular Sound to Downtown Farmington - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
According to a release from the Farmington Downtown Development Authority, the band's repertoire features big brass and the sultry sounds of salsa, hits from Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman and Tommy Dorsey, plus big-band versions of modern pop and rock
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REDLANDS: Bowl throws tribute to Harry James - Press-Enterprise
Google News - over 5 years
"A lot of the big bands do Sinatra, a lot do Jimmy and Tommy Dorsey, some Duke Ellington, some Count Basie," Poster said in a phone interview. "Nobody is doing Harry James but me." While other vintage bands might be played more often today,
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Cooper Orchestra returns to Morris - Morris Daily Herald
Google News - over 5 years
The orchestra has played the actual arrangements of the swing bands of Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey, Woody Herman, County Basie, etc. and the sweet bands of Dick Jurgens, Eddie Howard, Lawrence Welk, Sammy Kaye, Freddy Martin, Tiny Hill, Chuck Foster,
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Toledo Zoo offers free concert on August 7 - La Prensa
Google News - over 5 years
The Toledo Jazz Orchestra will perform swing-era favorites from Tommy Dorsey, Glenn Miller, Duke Ellington and other music legends. The concert will help fill the absence of the popular Music under the Stars concert series. Dr. Anne Baker, Toledo Zoo
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Toledo Zoo offers free concert - Fremont News Messenger
Google News - over 5 years
The Toledo Jazz Orchestra will perform swing-era favorites from Tommy Dorsey, Glenn Miller, Duke Ellington and other music legends. The concert, presented by The Blade in partnership with The Andersons, will help fill the absence of the popular Music
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New priest to continue tradition of music at Mary, Mother of the Redeemer in ... - Montgomery Newspapers
Google News - over 5 years
While serving in the armed forces during World War II, he won a competition to sing on the “Tommy Dorsey Show.” Dorsey — “The Sentimental Gentleman of Swing” and younger brother of bandleader Jimmy Dorsey — had a popular radio show in the 1930s and
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Jerry Ragovoy, songwriter and producer | Philadelphia Daily News | 2011-07-20 - Philadelphia Daily News
Google News - over 5 years
Jerry told the man he was going to the Earle Theatre to hear Tommy Dorsey, Frank Sinatra and Rosemary Clooney in concert. The stranger asked him if he would like to meet those stars, and Jerry said sure, wondering at the same time what this guy had
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Tommy Dorsey
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  • 1956
    On November 26, 1956, Dorsey died at age 51 in his Greenwich, Connecticut, home.
    More Details Hide Details He had begun taking sleeping pills regularly at this time, from which he was so sedated that one night he died in his sleep from choking after eating a heavy meal. At the time, his wife was questioned about her affair on Dorsey. Jimmy Dorsey led his brother's band until his own death from lung cancer the following year. At that point, trombonist Warren Covington became leader of the band with Jane Dorsey's blessing as she owned the rights to her late husband's band and name. Billed as the "Tommy Dorsey Orchestra Starring Warren Covington", they topped the charts in 1958 with "Tea For Two Cha-Cha". After Covington led the band for a short period, Sam Donahue led it starting in 1961, continuing until the late 1960s. Buddy Morrow conducted the Tommy Dorsey orchestra until his death on September 27, 2010. Jane Dorsey died of natural causes at the age of 79, in Miami, Florida in 2003. Tommy and Jane Dorsey are interred together in Kensico Cemetery in Valhalla, New York.
  • 1953
    The Dorsey Brothers appear in the 1953 sixteen-minute Universal-International film called The Dorsey Brothers Encore.
    More Details Hide Details Tommy Dorsey was posthumously inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame, which is a special Grammy award established in 1973 to honor recordings that are at least 25 years old and that have "qualitative or historical significance."
    In 1953, the Dorseys focused their attention on television.
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    Jimmy Dorsey broke up his own big band in 1953.
    More Details Hide Details Tommy invited him to join up as a feature attraction and, a short while later, Tommy renamed the band the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra featuring Jimmy Dorsey.
  • 1948
    Finally, Dorsey married Jane Carl New on March 27, 1948, in Atlanta, Georgia.
    More Details Hide Details She had been a dancer at the Copacabana nightclub in New York City. Tommy and Jane Dorsey had two children, Catherine Susan and Steve.
  • 1947
    The biographical film of 1947, The Fabulous Dorseys describes sketchy details of how the brothers got their start from-the-bottom-up into the jazz era of one-nighters, the early days of radio in its infancy stages, and the onward march when both brothers ended up with Paul Whiteman before 1935 when The Dorsey Brothers' Orchestra split into two.
    More Details Hide Details In the early 1950s, Tommy Dorsey moved from RCA Victor back to the Decca record label.
    Both of these successes made it possible for Dorsey to re-organize a big band in early 1947.
    More Details Hide Details The Dorsey brothers were also reconciling.
    In addition, "How Are Things In Glocca Morra?", a single recorded by Dorsey, became a top-ten hit in March 1947.
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    Dorsey might have broken up his own band permanently following World War II, as many big bands did due to the shift in music economics following the war, but Tommy Dorsey's album for RCA Victor, "All Time Hits" placed in the top ten records in February 1947.
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  • 1946
    Tommy Dorsey disbanded his own orchestra at the end of 1946.
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  • 1944
    After opening at the Los Angeles ballroom, the Hollywood Palladium, on the Palladium's first night, Dorsey's relations with the ballroom soured and he opened a competing ballroom, the Casino Gardens circa 1944.
    More Details Hide Details Dorsey also owned for a short time a trade magazine called The Bandstand.
  • 1943
    He then wed movie actress Pat Dane in 1943, and they were divorced in 1947, but not before he gained headlines for striking actor Jon Hall when Hall embraced Dorsey's wife.
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    They divorced in 1943 after Dorsey's affair with his former singer Edythe Wright.
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    Dorsey also performed with singer Connee Boswell Dorsey hired ex-bandleader and drummer Gene Krupa after Krupa's arrest and scandal for marijuana possession in 1943.
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  • 1942
    In 1942 Artie Shaw broke up his band and Dorsey hired the Shaw string section.
    More Details Hide Details As George Simon in Metronome magazine notes at the time, "They're used in the foreground and background (note some of the lovely obbligatos) for vocal effects and for Tommy's trombone." As Dorsey became successful, he made business decisions in the music industry. He loaned Glenn Miller money to launch Miller's successful band of 1938, but Dorsey saw the loan as an investment, entitling him to a percentage of Miller's income. When Miller balked at this, the angry Dorsey got even by sponsoring a new band led by Bob Chester, and hiring arrangers who deliberately copied Miller's style and sound. Dorsey branched out in the mid-1940s and owned two music publishing companies, Sun and Embassy.
    Bill Finegan, an arranger who left Glenn Miller's civilian band, arranged for the Tommy Dorsey band from 1942 to 1950.
    More Details Hide Details The band featured a number of future famous instrumentalists, singers and arrangers in the 1930s and '40s, including trumpeters Zeke Zarchy, Bunny Berigan, Ziggy Elman, Carl "Doc" Severinsen, and Charlie Shavers, pianists Milt Raskin, Jess Stacy, clarinetists Buddy DeFranco, Johnny Mince, and Peanuts Hucko. Others who played with Dorsey were drummers Buddy Rich, Louie Bellson, Dave Tough saxophonist Tommy Reed, and singers Frank Sinatra, Jack Leonard, Edythe Wright, Jo Stafford with The Pied Pipers, Dick Haymes and Connie Haines. In 1944, Dorsey hired the Sentimentalists who replaced the Pied Pipers.
  • 1940
    In 1982, the 1940 Victor recording "I'll Never Smile Again" was the first of a trio of Tommy Dorsey recordings to be inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.
    More Details Hide Details His theme song, "I'm Getting Sentimental Over You" was inducted in 1998, along with his recording of "Marie" written by Irving Berlin in 1928. In 1996, the U.S. Postal Service issued a Tommy Dorsey and Jimmy Dorsey commemorative postage stamp. Tommy Dorsey and his Orchestra appear in the following films for the studios Paramount, MGM, Samuel Goldwyn, Allied Artists and United Artists:
    Frank Sinatra made eighty recordings from 1940 to 1942 with the Dorsey band.
    More Details Hide Details Two of those eighty songs are "In the Blue of Evening" and "This Love of Mine". Frank Sinatra achieved his first great success as a vocalist in the Dorsey band and claimed he learned breath control from watching Dorsey play trombone. In turn, Dorsey said his trombone style was heavily influenced by that of Jack Teagarden. Among Dorsey's staff of arrangers was Axel Stordahl who arranged for Frank Sinatra in his Columbia and Capitol records years. Another member of the Dorsey band was trombonist Nelson Riddle, who later had a partnership as one of Sinatra's arrangers and conductors in the 1950s and afterwards. Another noted Dorsey arranger, who, in the 1950s, married and was professionally associated with Dorsey veteran Jo Stafford, was Paul Weston.
    In 1940, Dorsey hired singer Frank Sinatra from bandleader Harry James.
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  • 1939
    By 1939, Dorsey was aware of criticism that his band lacked a jazz feeling.
    More Details Hide Details He hired arranger Sy Oliver away from the Jimmie Lunceford band. Sy Oliver's arrangements include "On The Sunny Side of the Street" and "T.D.'s Boogie Woogie"; Oliver also composed two of the new band's signature instrumentals, "Well, Git It" and "Opus One".
  • 1937
    Tommy Dorsey and his Orchestra took over comedian Jack Pearl's radio show in 1937.
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  • 1936
    The Dorsey band had a national radio presence in 1936, first from Dallas and then from Los Angeles.
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  • 1935
    After his 1935 recording however, Dorsey's manager cut the "hot jazz" that Dorsey had mixed with his own lyrical style and instead had Dorsey play pop and vocal tunes.
    More Details Hide Details Dorsey would keep his Clambake Seven as a Dixieland group that played during performances, too.
    Ongoing acrimony between the brothers, however, led to Tommy Dorsey's walking out to form his own band in 1935, just as the orchestra was having a hit with "Every Little Moment."
    More Details Hide Details Dorsey's orchestra was known primarily for its renderings of ballads at dance tempos, frequently with singers such as Jack Leonard and Frank Sinatra. Tommy Dorsey's first band was formed out of the remains of the Joe Haymes band, and so began Dorsey's long-running practice of raiding other bands for talent. If he admired a vocalist, musician or arranger, he would think nothing of taking over their contracts and careers. Dorsey had a reputation for being a perfectionist. He was volatile and also known to hire and fire (and sometimes rehire) musicians based on his mood. The new band was popular from almost the moment it signed with RCA Victor with "On Treasure Island", the first of four hits for the new band in 1935.
  • 1934
    Future bandleader Glenn Miller was a member of the Dorsey Brothers Orchestra in 1934 and 1935, composing "Annie's Cousin Fanny", "Tomorrow's Another Day", "Harlem Chapel Chimes", and "Dese Dem Dose", all recorded for Decca, for the band.
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    In 1934, the Dorsey Brothers band signed with Decca records, having a hit with "I Believe In Miracles".
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  • 1929
    In 1929, the Dorsey Brothers had their first hit with "Coquette" for OKeh records.
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  • 1927
    In 1927 he joined Paul Whiteman.
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  • 1923
    In 1923, Dorsey followed his brother Jimmy to Detroit to play in Jean Goldkette's band and later returned to New York in 1925 to play with the California Ramblers.
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  • 1905
    Born on November 19, 1905.
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