Tommy Rettig
Actor; Computer Software engineer
Tommy Rettig
Thomas Noel "Tommy" Rettig was an American child actor, computer software engineer, and author. Rettig is best remembered for portraying the character "Jeff Miller" in the first three seasons of CBS's Lassie television series, from 1954–1957, later seen in syndicated re-runs as Jeff's Collie.
Biography
Tommy Rettig's personal information overview.
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The 5000 Fingers of Dr. T. showtimes - Chicago Reader
Google News - over 5 years
The plot basically consists of the florid nightmare of a ten-year-old boy (Tommy Rettig) about his authoritarian, prissy, and vaguely foreign piano teacher (Hans Conried), who forces 500 boys to play his monotonous exercise on a continuous keyboard
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Morning Call Sheet: Fox Fights the Future, Hatfields Fight the McCoys, and I ... - Big Hollywood
Google News - over 5 years
Cast: Marilyn Monroe, Robert Mitchum, Tommy Rettig, Rory Calhoun, Murvyn Vye. Director: Otto Preminger Not one of Marilyn Monroe's most famous films but still one of her best, thanks mainly to her chemistry with the underrated Mitchum
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1e diffusion : 12 septembre 1954 sur CBS - Toutelatele.com
Google News - over 5 years
Distribution : Jon Provost (Timmy Martin), June Lockhart (Ruth Martin), Hugh Reilly (Paul Martin), Jan Clayton (Ellen Miller), Tommy Rettig (Jeff Miller), Donald Keeler (Sylvester “Porky” Brockway), Arthur Space (Doc Weaver), George Cleveland (George
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WHAT'S ON TODAY
NYTimes - about 8 years
8 P.M. (Animal Planet) UNDERDOG TO WONDERDOG Abandoned shelter dogs are given a shot at being the pets they might have been, in this new canine makeover series that even Cinderella might envy. Led by Ryan Smith, a Wonder Team rescues and rehabilitates strays, after which they are trained by Andrea Arden, a dog behaviorist; groomed by Ali McLennan;
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Spare Times
NYTimes - over 9 years
AROUND TOWN HARLEM WEEK Now in its 33rd year, the month of festivities known as Harlem Week continues on Sunday with a full day of events. ''A Great Day in Harlem'' begins at noon in Ulysses S. Grant National Memorial Park, with performances from Broadway and Off Broadway plays; an excerpt from ''Lady Sings the Blues,'' featuring blues and jazz
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Corrections
NYTimes - over 12 years
A picture caption in The Arts on Thursday with an article about two former stars of the ''Lassie'' television show, June Lockhart and Jon Provost, misstated the timing of their work on the show. They were not the original stars; Jan Clayton and Tommy Rettig were.
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NYTimes article
AT LUNCH WITH: June Lockhart, Jon Provost and Lassie; Three TV Stars; One's Not Talking
NYTimes - over 12 years
It may not be up there with rescuing Timmy from the well or chasing away the shotgun-happy neighbor, but there is news on the Lassie front. Just this week, Lassie learned to eat with a fork. Oh, the surprises of lunch with June Lockhart and, well, a dog answering to Lassie. Forty-six years after the former starred in a show that had the same name
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MOVIES THIS WEEK
NYTimes - over 17 years
A LITERATE Tarzan adventure, a crime classic, an original fantasy and a smart-set whodunit lend zest to the array of films on television this week. At long last - a literate Tarzan adventure in Hugh Hudson's GREYSTOKE: THE LEGEND OF TARZAN, LORD OF THE APES (1984), including a thrilling jungle prelude with leopards and apes. This time, Tarzan
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FAMILY FARE; All Aboard In the Bronx
NYTimes - about 18 years
If you've ever wondered where all those old 45-r.p.m. records disappeared to, there's one being put to intriguing use in the Bronx: on the face of the Little Engine That Could. Ralph Lee, the puppeteer who founded the Greenwich Village Halloween Parade, is presenting his annual production of ''The Little Engine'' at the New York Botanical Garden,
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NYTimes article
Tommy Rettig, 54, Actor on 'Lassie'
NYTimes - about 21 years
Tommy Rettig, the first boy to play Lassie's master on television, was found dead in his home in Marina del Rey on Thursday. He was 54. The cause of death was not known, the Los Angeles County coroner's office said. Mr. Rettig was already a child star with movie and stage credits when he was picked from among 500 applicants in 1954 to play Lassie's
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CRITICS' CHOICES
NYTimes - almost 32 years
Interesting, variegated music weaves through some choice film fare on cable this week, starting with ''Sapphire, '' which will be shown on Sunday at 10 A.M. on WHT. In this excellent 1959 whodunit about racial tensions in London, a jazzy pulse heightens the suspense and umderscores the city's night-life background. The 1964 ''Zulu,'' a fierce and
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NYTimes article
JAN CLAYTON DEAD; ACTED ON BROADWAY AND IN TV 'LASSIE'
NYTimes - over 33 years
Jan Clayton, who played Tommy Rettig's mother in the original ''Lassie'' television series, died of cancer and other diseases Sunday at her home in West Hollywood. She was 66 years old. Miss Clayton, a native of Tularosa, N. M., graduated from Tularosa High School in 1935 and studied music and drama at Gulf Park College for Women in Gulfport, Miss.
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GOING OUT GUIDE
NYTimes - about 34 years
RICHNESS OF SHOWS You may not actually need a scorecard to follow all the ''players'' in the exhibitions now on view at the Pierpont Morgan Library, 29 East 36th Street (685-0008), but you should know that among them are Rembrandt, Charles Dickens, Stravinsky, Haydn and a clutch of French manuscript illuminators. That's an assortment typical of
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Tommy Rettig
    FIFTIES
  • 1996
    Age 54
    Died on February 15, 1996.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1991
    Age 49
    Rettig made a guest appearance in an episode of the later television series The New Lassie, with Jon Provost, which aired on October 25, 1991.
    More Details Hide Details The series featured appearances from two other Lassie veterans, Roddy McDowall, who had starred in the first movie Lassie Come Home (1943) and June Lockhart, who had starred in the 1945 movie Son of Lassie, and the television series (as Timmy's mother in the years after Rettig left the show). He died at fifty-four of a heart attack. His memorial service in Marina del Rey, California was attended by Roger Clinton, Jr., the half-brother of then U.S. President Bill Clinton; Lassie; Microsoft dignitaries; and several former child stars, who were featured in a photo spread in The National Enquirer.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1965
    Age 23
    He was cast as Frank in the 1965 "The Firebrand" of the NBC education drama series Mr. Novak, starring James Franciscus.
    More Details Hide Details With the group "The TR-4", he recorded the song by that title on the Velvet Tone label. While he was the TR-4 group's co-manager, he did not sing with them. Rettig only co-wrote the song in hopes of the TV soap using it as their theme. It was not chosen. As an adult, Rettig preferred to be called "Tom." He found the transition from child star difficult, and had several well-publicized legal entanglements relating to illegal recreational drugs (a conviction for growing marijuana on his farm, and a cocaine possession charge of which he was exonerated). Some years after he left acting, he became a motivational speaker, which - through work on computer mailing lists - led to involvement in the early days of personal computers. For the last 15 years of his life, Rettig was a well-known database programmer, author, and expert. He was an early employee of Ashton-Tate, and specialized in (sequentially) dBASE, Clipper, FoxBASE and finally FoxPro. Rettig moved to Marina del Rey in the late 1980s.
  • 1964
    Age 22
    From 1964 to 1965, he co-starred with another former child actor, Tony Dow, in the ABC television soap opera for teens Never Too Young.
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  • 1962
    Age 20
    In the 1962 episode "Davy's Friends" of the syndicated western television series, Death Valley Days, narrated by Stanley Andrews, Rettig played Joel Walter Robison, a fighter for Texas independence.
    More Details Hide Details In the story line, Robison, called a "friend" of Davy Crockett, is sent on a diversion but quickly shows his military ability and is made a first lieutenant by Sam Houston. Stephen Chase (1902-1982) played Sam Houston, and Russell Johnson was cast as Sergeant Tate in this segment.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1959
    Age 17
    At eighteen, he was cast as Pierre in the 1959 episode "The Ghost of Lafitte", set in New Orleans, of the ABC western series The Man from Blackhawk, starring Robert Rockwell as a roving insurance investigator.
    More Details Hide Details Actress Amanda Randolph was cast in the same episode as Auntie Cotton.
    He graduated in 1959 from University High School in Los Angeles.
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  • 1958
    Age 16
    On October 28, 1958, Rettig guest-starred in the episode "The Ghost" of the ABC/Warner Brothers western series, Sugarfoot, with Will Hutchins in the title role.
    More Details Hide Details In the segment, Rettig played Steve Carter, a troubled youth whom Sugarfoot is taking to Missouri to collect an inheritance. In this episode, Rettig sang "The Streets of Laredo".
  • 1954
    Age 12
    Rettig is remembered for portraying the character "Jeff Miller" in the first three seasons of CBS's Lassie television series, from 1954 to 1957, later seen in syndicated re-runs as Jeff's Collie.
    More Details Hide Details He also co-starred with another former child actor, Tony Dow, in the mid-1960s television teen soap opera Never Too Young and recorded the song by that title with the group The TR-4. Rettig was born to a Jewish father, Elias Rettig, and a Christian Italian-American mother, Rosemary Nibali, in Jackson Heights in the Queens borough of New York City. He started his career at the age of six, on tour with Mary Martin in the play Annie Get Your Gun, in which he played Little Jake. Before his famous role as Jeff Miller in the first Lassie television series, Rettig also appeared in about 18 feature films including So Big, The 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T (written by Dr. Seuss) and River of No Return with Marilyn Monroe and Robert Mitchum. It was his work with a dog in The 5000 Fingers Of Dr. T. that led animal trainer Rudd Weatherwax to urge him to audition for the Lassie role, for which Weatherwax supplied the famous collies.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1941
    Born
    Born on December 10, 1941.
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