Vivian Malone Jones
American activist
Vivian Malone Jones
Vivian Juanita Malone Jones was an African-American woman, one of the first two African Americans to enroll at the University of Alabama in 1963 and was made famous when Alabama Governor George Wallace blocked them from enrolling at the all-white university.
Biography
Vivian Malone Jones's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Vivian Malone Jones from around the web
Desegregation Trailblazer Dies At 70
Huffington Post - about 4 years
MONTGOMERY, Ala. — One of the first black students who enrolled at the University of Alabama a half century ago in defiance of racial segregation has died. James Hood of Gadsden was 70. Officials at Adams-Buggs Funeral Home in Gadsden said they are handling arrangements for Hood, who died Thursday. Then-Alabama Gov. George Wallace made his infamous "stand in the schoolhouse door" in a failed effort to prevent Hood and Vivian Malone from registering for classes at the university in 1963. Hood and Malone were accompanied by Deputy U.S. Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach when they were confronted by Wallace as they attempted to enter the university's Foster Auditorium to register for classes and pay fees. Wallace backed down later that day and Hood and Malone registered for classes. UA President Judy Bonner remembered Hood as a man of "courage and conviction" for being one of the first black students to enroll at the university. "His connection to the u ...
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Huffington Post article
Glen Browder: The Strange New Southern Politics: Court-Approved Biracial Accommodation
Huffington Post - over 4 years
In previous posts, I presented the South's new racial system as a "halfway house of racialized politics," or "biracial accommodation." The new black-white order is a curious concoction of relations reflecting a midway transition from the perverse Old South to the long-mythologized New South. And, strangely, public life in this halfway house has been embraced by politicians of both races and even the federal judiciary. Perhaps the best way to convey and illustrate the South's sense of accommodated progress is to examine the formal court settlement decree -- in Knight v. Alabama (2006) -- addressing historical racial discrimination in Alabama's higher education system. Case Study in Biracial Compromise Alabama, like many Southern states, has settled with African American litigants through an extensive action plan; it is attempting to correct its discriminatory past by pursuing a variety of commitments to "prepare all its students for productive lives in the twenty ...
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Huffington Post article
U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder mentions UA, George Wallace, Fred Gray in NAACP speech
Courier Journal - over 4 years
The late Vivian Malone Jones was Holder's sister-in-law.
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Courier Journal article
Jones-Lane - Shelby Star
Google News - over 5 years
The groom is the son of Mr. Kendall Allen Jones and the late Kimberly de Vaux Jones of Oak Island, NC He is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Carl M. Kirby of Southport, NC, and Mrs. Vivian Jones of Southport, NC A graduate of North Carolina State
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Google News article
Pesche honored at Chicago Botanic Garden - TribLocal
Google News - over 5 years
By Passages Hospice Dreams Friday at 3:32 pm Vivian Jones, Development Director at the Chicago Botanic Garden, shows Bette Pesche, 90, flowers blooming in the greenhouse. Pesche was the guest of honor at the Garden on August 23rd through Passages
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Google News article
FIVE STUDENTS RECEIVE SCHOLARSHIPS - LoveFM
Google News - over 5 years
The recipients are Reynaldo Ortega of Hattiville Village, Beatrice Chiac of Red Bank Village, Vivian Jones of Georgeville, Cayo District; Sa'ba'el Cho of Maya Mopan Village, Stann Creek District, and Isani Harris of Belize City
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Google News article
41 candidates seek school board seats in Spartanburg County districts - Spartanburg Herald Journal
Google News - over 5 years
District 51 — a seat currently held by two-term trustee Vivian Jones — will be a write-in contest after no candidates qualified by petition for the seat. Laye explained that write-in candidates must still qualify to serve in the seat,
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Google News article
BLACKBOARD JUNGLE - Reggaefrance.com
Google News - over 5 years
Depuis 2007, Blackboard Jungle est également un label, mettant en vedette des artistes tels que Anthony John, Afrikan Simba, Sand-i,Dawa Salut-Fi, Vivian Jones, etc .. d'autres à venir très bientôt, stay tuned!
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Google News article
Chelsea Cannon named Apple Day Queen - Canon City Daily Record
Google News - over 5 years
Her favorite book is “The Truth about Forever” and she enjoys watching Vivian Jones while snacking on Oreos and peaches. She said her goal is to figure out what college to attend and decide what her major will be. “I felt so excited,” she said
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Google News article
Driver Survives Crash Over Green Tree Hillside - WPXI Pittsburgh
Google News - over 5 years
It almost got hit by another truck and after it drove over the hill the guy who was in the truck jumped out and ran down the hill," said Vivian Jones. Chopper 11 flew over the scene and showed the driver being put on a stretcher and placed in an
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Google News article
Overheard, out and about, Mrs. Grundy sees all, tells all - Andalusia Star-News
Google News - over 5 years
Attending were Adrian Hixon, Rita Folmar, Dianne McKenzie, Beverly Wade, Joe Wingard, Warrick Maye, Ethel M. Robertson, Vivian Jones (district director), Holley Tullis, Sandra Tullis, Jacqueline Earthly, Janelle Riley, Calvin McIntyre and Rebekah
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Google News article
Lou Jones, 74, Sprinting Star
NYTimes - about 11 years
Lou Jones, a former world-record holder in the 400 meters and a member of the United States 4x400-meter relay squad that won a gold medal at the 1956 Melbourne Olympics, died Friday at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx. He was 74 and lived in New Rochelle, N.Y. His death was announced by his son Louis Jones IV. While in the Army after
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NYTimes article
Teacher Is Slain on Staten Island; Her Daughter and Son-In-Law Are Charged
NYTimes - over 18 years
A Staten Island woman who went back to school as an adult and became a special education teacher was slain the day before school started by her estranged son-in-law, with her daughter trying to cover up his role in the crime, the police said yesterday. The victim, Vivian Jones, 53, was stabbed and strangled in her home at 21 Egmont Place in the St.
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NYTimes article
Dance Notes
NYTimes - over 20 years
Bringing Home Ballet Gold Look out, world. Rasta Thomas has arrived. The 15-year-old dancer came home last month with a gold medal in the junior category from the International Ballet Competition in Varna, Bulgaria. Not only was Mr. Thomas the youngest dancer ever to win a gold medal at the Varna competition, the oldest and most prestigious of such
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NYTimes article
Nannygate for the Poor; The Underground Economy in Day Care for Children
NYTimes - almost 24 years
For years, Gladys Cordero was pointed out by strangers as "the lady in the green house." She cared for as many as 16 children at once in her modest home on Staten Island -- illegally. Neighbors knew her. Cabdrivers directed customers to her. Even the public elementary school across the street sent parents her way. A loyal clientele trailed the
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NYTimes article
G. H. Brown Wed To Ms. Waterbury
NYTimes - about 26 years
Suzanne Elaine Waterbury, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David M. Waterbury of Minneapolis, was married yesterday to Geoffrey Hewlett Brown, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Thatcher M. Brown 3d of New York and Dorset, Vt. The Rev. Vivian Jones performed the ceremony at Plymouth Congregational Church in Minneapolis. The bride, 24 years old, and the bridegroom,
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NYTimes article
Ann M. Journey Weds Ray Wuolo
NYTimes - almost 27 years
LEAD: Ann Marie Journey, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Drexel Dahlke Journey of Washington, and Ray Wilbert Wuolo, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Wilbert Leander Wuolo of Rochester, Minn., were married yesterday. The Rev. Vivian Jones performed the ceremony at the Plymouth Congregational Church in Minneapolis. Ann Marie Journey, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
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NYTimes article
Oakland Schools Face Bankruptcy and Scandal
NYTimes - over 27 years
LEAD: The Oakland school system is enmeshed in a scandal involving arrests of school officials and allegations of widespread patronage at a time when it is threatened with bankruptcy. The Oakland school system is enmeshed in a scandal involving arrests of school officials and allegations of widespread patronage at a time when it is threatened with
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NYTimes article
Metro Matters; Leading Workers In Home Care Out of Poverty
NYTimes - almost 29 years
LEAD: ''I have walked up the steps; I have shopped for them,'' Martha Green said. ''I have been stuck in the elevator. I have gone into very dangerous buildings, but I also ask God to protect me because someone has to do for them. If we live to reach some of our clients' ages, we need someone to care for us. ''I have walked up the steps; I have
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Vivian Malone Jones
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2005
    Age 62
    Died in 2005.
    More Details Hide Details
  • FIFTIES
  • 2000
    Age 57
    In 2000, the University of Alabama bestowed on her a doctorate of humane letters.
    More Details Hide Details Jones died following a stroke at age 63 in an Atlanta hospital. Her funeral services were held at the Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel at Morehouse College. She was married to Mack Jones, a physician, who died in 2004. She was survived by a son, a daughter, three grandchildren, four sisters and three brothers. She was a faithful member of From the Heart Church Ministries of Atlanta where she served as an usher. Her brother-in-law Eric Holder is the current U.S. Attorney General. Her nephew Jeff Malone was an All-America basketball student-athlete at Mississippi State and NBA standout.
  • 1996
    Age 53
    She was appointed to a position as the Executive Director of the Voter Education Project and worked towards voter equality for minorities, thus assisting millions of African-Americans to register to vote. She later became the Director of Civil Rights and Urban Affairs and Director of Environmental Justice for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, a position she held until her retirement in 1996.
    More Details Hide Details In October 1996, Jones was chosen by the George Wallace Family Foundation to be the first recipient of its Lurleen B. Wallace Award of Courage. At the ceremony, Wallace said, "Vivian Malone Jones was at the center of the fight over states' rights and conducted herself with grace, strength and, above all, courage."
  • TWENTIES
  • 1965
    Age 22
    Two years later, in 1965, she received a Bachelor of Arts in business management and became the first African-American to graduate from the University of Alabama.
    More Details Hide Details She graduated with a B-plus average. Despite earning high academic achievements from the university, she never received a job offer in Alabama. She later joined the civil rights division of the U.S. Department of Justice and served as a research analyst. While in Washington, she attended George Washington University and pursued a Master's Degree in Public Administration. She took a job as an employee relations specialist at the central office of the United States Veteran's Administration.
  • 1963
    Age 20
    Malone's time spent at the University of Alabama was relatively free of conflict and threats to her safety, with the exception of a spree of bombings that occurred in November 1963 by rioting whites possibly angry with the integration policy.
    More Details Hide Details After much deliberation between the U.S. Marshal and Katzenbach, it was decided that Malone would not be taken out of school or unenrolled because of the bombings.
    On June 11, 1963, Malone and Hood, accompanied by United States Deputy Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach and a three-car motorcade full of federal marshals, arrived at the University of Alabama's campus with the intention to enroll.
    More Details Hide Details Waiting for them on campus and blocking the entryway to Foster Auditorium was Governor Wallace, flanked by a group of state troopers. Wallace intended to keep true to his promise of upholding segregation in the state and stopping "integration at the schoolhouse door". As Malone and Hood waited in a car, Deputy Attorney General Katzenbach and a small team of federal marshals confronted Wallace to demand that Malone and Hood be allowed entry by order of the state court and for Wallace to step aside. Wallace had not only refused the order, but he interrupted Katzenbach; in front of the crowds of media crews surrounding him, Wallace delivered a short, symbolic speech concerning state sovereignty, claiming that "The unwelcomed, unwanted, unwarranted and force-induced intrusion upon the campus of the University of Alabama... of the might of the Central Government offers frightful example of the oppression of the rights, privileges and sovereignty of this State by officers of the Federal Government."
    After two years of deliberation and court proceedings, she and James Hood were granted permission to enroll in the university by order of District Court Judge Harlan Grooms in 1963.
    More Details Hide Details The district court had ruled that the University of Alabama's practice of denying African-American students admission into their university was a violation of the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in the Brown v. Board of Education case in which the act of educating black children in schools intentionally separated from white students was charged as unconstitutional. Judge Grooms had also forbidden Governor Wallace from interfering with the students' registration.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1961
    Age 18
    In 1961, Malone had received word from a family friend that there had been a plan organized by the local Non-Partisan Voter League to desegregate the University of Alabama's branch school in Mobile, The University of South Alabama.
    More Details Hide Details Due to her exceptional performance in high school, Malone was one out of a number of local black students suggested by the organization to apply to the Mobile campus. At least 200 black students had applied to the university, only to have their applications rejected by admissions. The university denied admission to the applicants on the grounds of over enrollment and closed enrollment, the quotas already being filled or the academic performance of the students not being of required standards; however it had become fairly understood by the community that the university would not admit the black students because of the resistance to school desegregation. Black students who had applied to the university's branch campus in Mobile were investigated by the university's Department of Public Safety, including Malone herself. After applying to the University of South Alabama, Malone and her family had been visited by two white men who had claimed that they were representatives of the state. They disclosed that her attempts to apply to the Mobile campus and integrate with the school had instigated violent retaliation from the local white community from which the family would not receive much protection. The threat to her safety did not deter Malone from continuing to support integration in the university and she persisted in applying to the University of Alabama to earn a degree in accounting.
    Malone attended Central High School, where she was a member of the National Honor Society. In February 1961, she enrolled in Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University, one of the few colleges for black students in the state.
    More Details Hide Details She attended Alabama A&M for two years and received a Bachelor's degree in Business Education. Malone had wanted to pursue a degree in accounting, a field of study not offered by Alabama A&M at the time. Moreover, the Bachelor's degree that Malone had received was issued to her before the University had been fully accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. To earn an accredited degree in accounting, Malone would have to transfer to another university.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1942
    Born
    Malone was born in Mobile, Alabama in 1942, the fourth of eight children.
    More Details Hide Details Her parents both worked at Brookley Air Force Base; her father served in maintenance and her mother worked as a domestic servant. Her parents emphasized the importance of receiving an education and made sure that their children attended college. Each of Malone's older brothers attended Tuskegee University. Her parents were also active in civil rights and often participated in local meetings, donations, and activities in the community that promoted equality and desegregation. As a teenager, Vivian was often involved in community organizations to end racial discrimination and worked closely with local leaders of the movements to work for desegregation in schools.
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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