Vladimir Posner
American journalist
Vladimir Posner
Vladimir Vladimirovich Posner, born 1 April 1934, is a Russian journalist best known in the West for appearing on television to represent and explain the views of the Soviet Union during the Cold War. He was a memorable spokesman for the Soviets in part because he had grown up in the United States and spoke flawless American English with a New York accent.
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Vladimir Posner's personal information overview.
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Author, journalist Vladimir Pozner says America and Russia need to be allies
Cleveland.com - almost 5 years
America shouldn't give up on Russia as either an ally or as a developing democracy. That was a theme Russian journalist, author and TV interviewer Vladimir Pozner emphasized Tuesday during his Cleveland Clinic Ideas for Tomorrow speech.
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Cleveland.com article
When Lenin Met Lennon - Transitions Online
Google News - over 5 years
Since the late 1980s he has worked often in the former communist world, producing documentaries on subjects such as the Soviet missile and space programs, the Srebrenica massacre, the Russian-American commentator Vladimir Posner, and American-born
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Google News article
NY Times's Jackie Calmes Again Insists on Success of Obama's 'Stimulus' - NewsBusters (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
Remember Gorachev's press guy Vladimir Posner? These people remind me of him. Totally oblivious to reality and committed to the Party line. So sad. Democrat tax increases always hurt the Middle Class worse than the rich. That (middle America) is where
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Google News article
Vue de Russie, la France de la « diversité » et des « chances pour… » est-elle ... - AgoraVox
Google News - over 5 years
Le Tour de France, avec Vladimir Posner et Ivan Ourgant, en 12 épisodes de 52 minutes. Pour eux la réponse est assez claire. Nous sommes envahis et la France est en train d'être défigurée….. Faute d'une version traduite, les images des premières
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Google News article
Clash of the TV titans - Tne Moscow News
Google News - almost 6 years
Mr. TV is Vladimir Posner, of course, a hallmark presence over three decades on the Soviet and post-Soviet airwaves as arch-interviewer and major auteur – oh, and longtime president of the Russian Television Academy. And in that corner, wearing the red
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Google News article
Russia Acquits 6 in Killing of Reporter Investigating the Military
NYTimes - over 14 years
In a verdict that outraged Russian journalists, a military court acquitted six men today, five of them army officers, in the murder of Dmitri Kholodov, a journalist investigating corruption in the Russian military in the early 1990's. It was a bitter end to a high-profile investigation that began more than seven years ago, when Mr. Kholodov, a
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NYTimes article
Russia's Regional TV Stations Suffer as Nationwide Broadcaster Stays Dark
NYTimes - about 15 years
Last week, a Russian court shut off the signal of TV-6, the independent nationwide broadcaster, declaring it insolvent in proceedings the network says were rigged. The day after, the network's partner in the Siberian city of Surgut filled the void in its airwaves with a broadcast of the office parrot. If all-parrot, all-the-time television seems
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NYTimes article
Appearing Nightly: Robert Dornan, Master of the Put-Down
NYTimes - over 21 years
As the Republican presidential candidates trek America's political stage, Representative Robert K. Dornan, far back in the pack, stands out as the lounge act of the show. He is the warm-up man and put-down artist tart as Don Rickles, skewering President Clinton as a "draft-dodging adulterer" leading the nation's "cultural meltdown" that a Dornan
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The Nation; Once again, Capital Cry: Press Did It!
NYTimes - about 23 years
LIKE every other week in America, last week had its share of people vying for victimhood. Lorena Bobbitt, on the eve of her acquittal, clutched a teddy bear and bouquet, and Tonya Harding skated on a rink of thin ice to smile up innocently at Diane Sawyer. But out of all the would-be victims, the most peculiar was Bobby Ray Inman. The Rose Garden
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NYTimes article
CRIME/MYSTERY; Arkady Returns to the Big Potato
NYTimes - over 24 years
RED SQUARE By Martin Cruz Smith. 418 pp. New York: Random House. $23. WHEN the world of the Moscow police detective Arkady Renko was created for the icy mystery novel "Gorky Park," the idea was daring fun because it tapped some of the deep tensions of the cold war for narrative energy and allowed us some merely murderous, rather than apocalyptic,
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NYTimes article
The Crucible; Can the Soviets Avoid Chaos On the Way to A New Society?
NYTimes - over 25 years
The events that have shaken the Soviet Union and the world over the last two weeks have been above all a trial by fire of the people and processes shaped by six years of perestroika. It has been a test in which the men at the forefront of the struggle for change have confirmed their determination and emerged dominant as the arbiters of Soviet
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NYTimes article
SOVIET TURMOIL; New Faces Rise in Moscow, As Do Some Once Shunned
NYTimes - over 25 years
Boris D. Pankin became the new Soviet Foreign Minister today on the basis of a single but rare deed. Alone among the Soviet diplomatic corps, Mr. Pankin, the Soviet Ambassador to Czechoslovakia, spoke out against the coup d'etat on Tuesday, Aug. 20, when tanks were still on the streets of Moscow and President Mikhail S. Gorbachev was still held
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CHRONICLE
NYTimes - over 25 years
VLADIMIR POSNER, the spokesman and commentator for the Soviet broadcasting system, has quit his job and is to become a host with PHIL DONAHUE on a syndicated news talk show. Mr. Posner, who said he quit his own television show because he opposed the state directive banning criticism of Soviet President MIKHAIL S. GORBACHEV, signed a deal last month
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NYTimes article
THE NOVEMBER REPORT; Progressive Before Its Time
NYTimes - over 27 years
LEAD: BY 1914, 30 years into a teaching career that began in a one-room schoolhouse, Caroline Pratt had developed serious doubts about her profession. BY 1914, 30 years into a teaching career that began in a one-room schoolhouse, Caroline Pratt had developed serious doubts about her profession. ''You will not find a child anywhere who will sit
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NYTimes article
THE MEDIA BUSINESS: Advertising; Bozell to Show Soviets Good Side of Advertising
NYTimes - almost 28 years
LEAD: When Mikhail S. Gorbachev saw Times Square's neon signs on his visit to New York City last fall, the Soviet leader glimpsed American advertising at its most exuberant. Tonight the Soviet people will get a fuller - if more low key - introduction to this peculiarly capitalist phenomenon. When Mikhail S. Gorbachev saw Times Square's neon signs
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NYTimes article
Review/Television; Koppel to Space: 'News From Earth'
NYTimes - about 28 years
LEAD: Much is made on tonight's edition of ''The Koppel Report'' of the possibility that its contents might, in time and over distance, be received by an alien intelligence, since television signals never disintegrate but travel indefinitely through space. The prospect calls up an appalling image of unbiodegradable verbiage clogging the heavens.
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NYTimes article
GORBACHEV FOCUS MAY BE ON TRADE; HE ARRIVES TODAY
NYTimes - about 28 years
LEAD: Mikhail S. Gorbachev, who is due in New York today, may use his visit to mount an assault on United States trade restrictions and to offer a new proposal to reduce conventional weapons in Europe, American officials said yesterday. Mikhail S. Gorbachev, who is due in New York today, may use his visit to mount an assault on United States trade
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NYTimes article
ESSAY; Doomed to Cooperate?
NYTimes - over 28 years
LEAD: The pressure to embrace Mikhail Gorbachev as the apostle of democratization and disarmament proved too much for Ronald Reagan this week. The pressure to embrace Mikhail Gorbachev as the apostle of democratization and disarmament proved too much for Ronald Reagan this week. The summiteering President, repeatedly attributing the cruel Soviet
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NYTimes article
THE MEDIA BUSINESS; Soviet No Longer Sees Ads as Capitalist Curse
NYTimes - over 28 years
LEAD: ''Advertising is a means of swindling the people by foisting upon them goods frequently useless and of dubious quality,'' the Soviet Encylopedia said in the late 1940's. ''Advertising involves the popularization of goods with the aim of selling them,'' the current edition says. ''Advertising is a means of swindling the people by foisting upon
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NYTimes article
THE MEDIA BUSINESS; Ad for Pepsi On Soviet TV
NYTimes - almost 29 years
LEAD: Pepsico Inc., which says that Pepsi-Cola was the first Western consumer product offered in the Soviet Union (in 1974), now claims to be the first American company to have bought commercial time on Soviet television. Pepsico Inc., which says that Pepsi-Cola was the first Western consumer product offered in the Soviet Union (in 1974), now
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Vladimir Posner
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2010
    Age 75
    Pozner and Urgant also collaborated on a subsequent projects: "Tour de France", "Their Italy", "German conundrum", "England generally and particularly", "Jewish happiness", set to air in 2010, 2012, 2013, 2015, 2016 respectively.
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  • 2008
    Age 73
    In 2008 Pozner, with Ivan Urgant and Brian Kahn, released "Odnoetazhnaya Amerika" ("One-Storied America"), a 16 episode travel documentary based on the 1937 book "Little Golden America" by Ilya Ilf and Yevgenyi Petrov.
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  • 1997
    Age 62
    In 1997, Pozner founded the School for Television Excellence («Школа телевизионного мастерства») in Moscow to educate and promote young journalists.
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    He returned to Moscow in 1997, continuing his work as an independent television journalist.
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  • FIFTIES
  • 1994
    Age 59
    From its foundation in 1994 until 2008 Pozner was president of the Russian Television Academy, which annually awards the prestigious TEFI trophy.
    More Details Hide Details Pozner also worked for the Institute for US and Canadian Studies, a Soviet think tank. Since 2004, Pozner and his brother Pavel have owned a French brasserie in Moscow, Жеральдин (Chez Géraldine), named after their mother. For many years during the Cold War, Vladimir Pozner delivered the nightly "Radio Moscow News and Commentary" program on the North America Service with his signature greeting, "Thank you and good evening". Pozner was the host of several shows on Russian TV, among them the US-Soviet space bridges, "Mi" (translated "Us"), "Vremya i Mi" ("The Time and Us"), "Voskresnyi Vecher s Vladimirom Poznerom" ("Sunday Night with Vladimir Pozner"), "Chelovek v maske" ("A Man in the Mask"), "Vremena" ("Times"). Most of these followed a talk show format, with varying numbers of guests and varying degree and manner of audience participation.
  • 1991
    Age 56
    Later that year Pozner received an offer to work with Phil Donahue and moved to the United States. From 1991 to 1994 they co-hosted Pozner/Donahue, a weekly, issues-oriented roundtable program, which was aired both on CNBC and in syndication.
    More Details Hide Details While living in New York, Pozner regularly commuted to Moscow to tape his programs that aired in Russia.
    However, in 1991 Pozner was asked to resign after being quoted voicing his support for Boris Yeltsin over Mikhail Gorbachev.
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  • 1990
    Age 55
    However, while stopping short of unequivocal endorsement and support, he nevertheless rationalized, among others, the arrest and exiling of Andrei Sakharov, the invasion of Afghanistan and shooting down of KAL 007, in his 1990 autobiography Parting with Illusions.
    More Details Hide Details Later, he wrote that some of the positions he had taken were wrong and immoral. In a 2005 interview with NPR's On the Media, Pozner spoke openly about his role as a Soviet spokesman, stating bluntly, "What I was doing was propaganda." Comparing his former role to that of Karen Hughes, the U.S. Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs, he commented that, "You know, as someone who's gone through this and someone who regrets having done what he's done, and who spent many, many years of his life, and I think probably the best years of my life, doing something that was wrong, I say it just isn't worth it". Despite his frequent appearances in the Western media and his near-celebrity status as the principal spokesman for the Soviet Union Pozner remained virtually unknown at home.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1968
    Age 33
    They divorced in 1968.
    More Details Hide Details Pozner's daughter, composer Katia Tchemberdji, currently lives in Berlin. Around the time of his divorce Pozner met his second wife, Ekaterina Orlova, while they both worked for Novosti Press Agency's Sputnik magazine. They were married for 35 years. Orlova, an accomplished journalist in her own right, was a co-founder of the Pozner School for Television Excellence. Since 2005 Pozner has been linked with Nadezhda Soloviova, а leading Russian show business impresario. Pozner holds 3 citizenships: French - by birth, Russian (initially, Soviet) - presumably by descent and US - obtained in the early 1990s by naturalization. In 1968, while attempting to renounce his French nationality so that he could visit France without fear of prosecution for failure to serve in the Algerian War, he was formally notified by the Soviet Foreign Ministry that his Soviet passport, initially granted to him in 1950, at 16, was issued in error, and that he in fact was not a citizen of the USSR. Much to Pozner's amusement this also technically invalidated, among other things, his membership in the CPSU, his marriage and divorce, propiska and his rank of lieutenant in the reserves.
  • 1967
    Age 32
    In 1967 he transferred to a sister publication, Sputnik, leaving it in February 1970 to become a host of the Voice of Moscow, a "propaganda radio program", according to RT, a television network funded by the Russian government.
    More Details Hide Details Pozner worked as chief commentator for the North American service of the Radio Moscow network. In the early 1970s, he was a regular guest on Ray Briem's talk show on KABC in Los Angeles. During the 1980s, he was a favourite guest on Ted Koppel's Nightline. Pozner was the host of Moscow Meridian, an English-language current affairs program focusing on the Soviet Union; the show was produced by Gosteleradio, the Soviet State Committee for Television and Radio and broadcast on the Satellite Program Network. He also often appeared on The Phil Donahue Show. In his Western media appearances Pozner was a charismatic and articulate apologist of some of the Soviet Union's most controversial foreign and domestic policy decisions. A master of tu quoque, he would frequently draw parallels and point out similarities between Soviet and Western policies as well as candidly admitting the existence of certain problems in the USSR.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1961
    Age 26
    Pozner began his career as "quote, unquote a journalist", unwittingly, according to Pozner, in a disinformation department of the KGB. In 1961 he was offered the position of senior editor with the English-language Soviet Life magazine.
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  • 1958
    Age 23
    He graduated in 1958.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1953
    Age 18
    In 1953 the younger Pozner enrolled at Moscow State University, Faculty of Biology and Soil Science, majoring in human physiology.
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  • 1950
    Age 15
    At some point Pozner junior claimed to have stayed behind in New York, attending Columbia College between 1950 and December 1953; however, there appears to be no record of him at Columbia; currently he tells of attending a Russian military-style high school in Berlin run by the Soviet Military Administration during that time.
    More Details Hide Details Later, in 1952, the family moved to Moscow.
  • 1948
    Age 13
    So the Pozners moved in 1948 to the Soviet sector of Berlin where Pozner senior was offered a position with SovExportFilm, an international distributor of Soviet films.
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  • 1946
    Age 11
    In 1946, with the advent of what later came to be called McCarthyism, Pozner senior began to have serious problems with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, because of his pro-Soviet views and correctly suspected cooperation with the Soviet intelligence services.
    More Details Hide Details The documents that conclusively proved the secret service connections of his father were published in 1996 in the US. As a result, the Pozners intended to return to France, but Pozner senior was refused a French visa after being denounced to the French Foreign Ministry as a "subversive element" and a spy.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1940
    Age 5
    After the outbreak of World War II and the invasion of France the Pozners fled Paris in the fall of 1940, traveling via Marseilles in the Free Zone, Madrid, Barcelona, and Lisbon, before sailing back to America.
    More Details Hide Details The escape was partially financed by a Jewish family whose adult daughter traveled with the Pozners disguised as Vladimir's nanny. Back in New York Vladimir attended Caroline Pratt's City and Country School and later Stuyvesant High School in Manhattan. Robert Hollander, an elementary school friend of Pozner, remembered him most vividly for "his capacities for, one, having extraordinarily attractive fantasies and, two, for getting the rest of us to believe them."
  • 1939
    Age 4
    In the spring of 1939 Pozner's parents reunited and the family returned to Paris, France.
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  • 1934
    Born
    Vladimir Pozner was born on April 1, 1934, in Paris to a Russian Jewish father, Vladimir Aleksandrovich Pozner, and a French Catholic mother, Géraldine Lutten.
    More Details Hide Details The couple separated shortly after his birth. When Vladimir was 3 months old he and his mother moved to New York City, where Géraldine's mother and younger sister lived.
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