Walter Winchell
Journalist, commentator
Walter Winchell
Walter Winchell was an American newspaper and radio gossip commentator.
Biography
Walter Winchell's personal information overview.
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News abour Walter Winchell from around the web
THE WEEK AHEAD; Sept. 4 -- Sept. 10
NYTimes - over 5 years
Art Robin Pogrebin Mary Wollstonecraft's treatise ''A Vindication of the Rights of Woman'' -- in which she asserted the equality of the sexes -- is widely considered a foundation of the modern women's rights movement. Now the artist MATTHEW BUCKINGHAM is using it as a video monologue in an exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum that pays homage to
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NYTimes article
Sept. 4 — Sept. 10 - New York Times
Google News - over 5 years
Some of the series's coming high points include the pungently sour “Sweet Smell of Success,” in which Burt Lancaster plays a bullying newspaper columnist inspired by Walter Winchell, and Sidney Lumet's fiercely realistic police corruption thriller,
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Very Professional Reporter Asks Soccer Player To Autograph Her Ass - BestWeekEver.tv (satire)
Google News - over 5 years
... most professional sense of the word) Viviana Sánchez interviewing soccer player Wilson Munoz after a match and, in a move of hard-hitting journalism reminiscent of the late Walter Winchell, pulling down her pants and asking for him to sign her ass
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Google News article
Crime History: Murder Inc. boss - Washington Examiner
Google News - over 5 years
24, in 1939, the leader of the mob hit squad, "Murder Inc." surrendered to columnist Walter Winchell, who then turned him over to FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover. In 1937, Louis "Lepke" Buchalter went into hiding, and sought to have Murder Inc. hitmen
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Google News article
Weekend Spotlight: Author Neil Gabler To Speak at Amagansett Library - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
Gabler's four books written about the history of Hollywood and entertainment includes a critically-acclaimed biography of gossip columnist and radio broadcaster Walter Winchell. Gabler's next published work will be a biography of Sen. Edward Kennedy
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Andy Griffith: Behind The Music - Pittsburgh Post Gazette
Google News - over 5 years
... cast included some other heavy hitters as well, among them Walter Matthau, Tony Franciosa and in her first film role, Lee Remick, with cameos from future 60 Minutes luminary Mike Wallace and the notorious gossip column pioneer Walter Winchell
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Google News article
The New Guy: Interview With Warehouse 13's Aaron Ashmore - The Morton Report
Google News - over 5 years
In the following episode, “Trials,” she and Pete must find Walter Winchell's tie clip, which causes a person to regress and lose their memory. Meanwhile, Artie puts Claudia (Allison Scagliotti) in charge of her first mission and sends her with Steve in
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Google News article
A life way beyond colorful - Kansas City Star
Google News - over 5 years
Columnist Walter Winchell intimated that Parker and Nica were having an affair. (Kastin doesn't think so, nor do the many people he's interviewed.) Soon after Parker's death, Nica was asked to leave. She found a similarly luxe living situation in a
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Google News article
I offer a toast to Mr. Okrent's book - Bluffton News Banner
Google News - over 5 years
Stack played the tight-lipped Treasury agent Eliot Ness in “The Untouchables,” the television series with the ponderous theme song that featured Walter Winchell's equally ponderous narration. So when Ness confronted Al Capone and the boozy bad guys,
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Google News article
Lithgow returns to Broadway as a columnist - MiamiHerald.com
Google News - over 5 years
Lithgow, who recently won an Emmy on Dexter, got a Tony for playing another columnist based on Walter Winchell in the 2002 musical The Sweet Smell of Success. He also earned a Tony in 1973 for his Broadway debut in The Changing Room
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Google News article
PLAYBILL.COM'S THEATRE WEEK IN REVIEW, July 23-29: Zach Braff, a Move for the ... - Playbill.com
Google News - over 5 years
And in the 2002 musical The Sweet Smell of Success, for which he received a Tony Award, he played gossip columnist JJ Hunsecker, a character based on Walter Winchell. Which makes me think: Lithgow is what casting directors think journalists look and
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John Lithgow to return to Broadway as a columnist - 6abc.com
Google News - over 5 years
Lithgow, who recently won an Emmy on "Dexter," got a Tony for playing another columnist based on Walter Winchell in the 2002 musical "The Sweet Smell of Success." He also earned a Tony in 1973 for his Broadway debut in "The Changing Room
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Google News article
TBR; Inside the List
NYTimes - over 5 years
ADVANCE MAN: A few weeks ago, I promised to eat my complete Harry Potter library if ''A Dance With Dragons,'' the eagerly awaited fifth installment in George R. R. Martin's ''Song of Ice and Fire'' fantasy series, didn't enter the hardcover fiction list at No. 1. That's probably still a safe bet, though I did wonder if I should start firing up the
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NYTimes article
7 Reasons Why You Need To See Sweet Smell Of Success In Brooklyn Bridge Park ... - Gothamist
Google News - over 5 years
Falco sees the key to success personified in JJ Hunsecker, the feared gossip columnist inspired by real-life columnist and radio host Walter Winchell, who wielded immense power in the middle of the 20th century. Burt Lancaster is riveting and
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Google News article
Who took the fight out of Americans? - WND.com
Google News - over 5 years
Columnist Walter Winchell fixed them pretty good. He wrote 'There were more American flags than Americans'!" "I think we agree, comrades, that the weapon that works best against America isn't the hit, but the threat." "Why didn't we just threaten war
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Google News article
'Warehouse 13' Recap: "Trials" - Ology
Google News - over 5 years
Eric's mother was only using Walter Winchell's tie clip (yep) to pull the memories out of key witnesses in order to protect her son. Since the tie's mind-wipe powers were activated by asking questions, she'd made Sawyer the attorney her pawn,
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Walter Winchell
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1972
    Age 74
    He led the charity - with the support of celebrities including Marlene Dietrich, Bob Hope, Milton Berle, Marilyn Monroe, and Joe DiMaggio - until his own death from cancer in 1972.
    More Details Hide Details In 1950, Ernest Lehman, a former publicity writer for Irving Hoffman of The Hollywood Reporter, wrote a story for Cosmopolitan titled "Tell Me About It Tomorrow". The piece is about a ruthless journalist, J.J. Hunsecker, and is generally thought to be a thinly veiled commentary on the power wielded by Winchell at the height of his influence. It was made into the film Sweet Smell of Success (1957), and the screenplay was written by Lehman and Clifford Odets. Walter Winchell is the first person credited for coining the word frienemy in an article published by the Nevada State Journal on 19 May 1953. In his 1962 Hugo Award-winning novel "Stranger in a Strange Land," science fiction master Robert Heinlein introduced the term "winchell" into the American vocabulary, as a term for a politically intrusive gossip columnist referring to the character Ben Caxton. He contrasted Winchell with another well-known journalist, Walter Lippmann, whose forte was politics rather than celebrity gossip. Jill: "Ben's not a winchell, he's a lippmann!" Jubal: "Sorry, I'm colorblind at that distance."
  • 1969
    Age 71
    Winchell announced his retirement on February 5, 1969, citing the tragedy of his son's suicide as a major reason, while also noting the delicate health of Magee.
    More Details Hide Details Exactly one year after his retirement, common-law wife Elizabeth June Magee Winchel died at a Phoenix hospital while undergoing treatment for a heart condition. Winchell spent his final two years as a recluse at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles. Larry King, who replaced Winchell at the Miami Herald, observed: He was so sad. You know what Winchell was doing at the end? Typing out mimeographed sheets with his column, handing them out on the corner. That's how sad he got. When he died, only one person came to his funeral: his daughter. Several of Winchell's former co-workers expressed a willingness to go, but were turned back by his daughter Walda.)
  • 1968
    Age 70
    Walter Jr., the only son of the journalist, committed suicide in his family's garage on Christmas night, 1968.
    More Details Hide Details Having spent the previous two years on welfare, Walter Jr. had last been employed as a dishwasher in Santa Ana, California, but listed himself as a freelancer who for a time wrote a column in the Los Angeles Free Press, an alternative newspaper published between 1964 and 1978.
  • 1963
    Age 65
    The New York Daily Mirror, his flagship newspaper for 34 years, closed in 1963; his readership dropped steadily, and he faded from the public eye.
    More Details Hide Details Winchell became notorious for his attempts to destroy the careers of his political and personal enemies as his own career progressed, especially after World War II. Favorite tactics were allegations of having ties to Communist organizations and accusations of sexual impropriety. He was not above childish name-calling; for example, he described New York radio host Barry Gray as "Borey Pink" and a "disk jerk". Winchell heard that Marlen Edwin Pew of the trade journal Editor & Publisher had criticized him as a bad influence on the American press, and he began calling him "Marlen Pee-you". For most of his career, his contracts with newspaper and radio employers required them to hold him harmless from any damages resulting from lawsuits for slander or libel. He would unapologetically publish material told to him in confidence by friends; when confronted over such betrayals, he typically responded, "I know - I'm just a son of a bitch." By the mid-1950s, he was widely seen as arrogant, cruel, and ruthless.
  • 1960
    Age 62
    In 1960, he signed with NBC to host a variety program called The Walter Winchell Show, which was canceled after only thirteen weeks—a particularly bitter failure in view of the success of his longtime rival Ed Sullivan in a similar format.
    More Details Hide Details In the early 1960s, a public dispute with Jack Paar effectively ended Winchell's career—already in steep decline due to his association with McCarthy—signaling a shift in power from print to television. Winchell had angered Paar several years earlier when he refused to retract an item alleging that Paar was having marital difficulties. Biographer Neal Gabler described the exchange on Paar's show in 1961: Hostess Elsa Maxwell appeared on the program and began gibing at Walter, accusing him of hypocrisy for waving the flag while never having voted incidentally, wasn't true; the show later issued a retraction. Paar joined in. He said Walter's column was "written by a fly" and that his voice was so high because he wears "too-tight underwear" … He also told the story of the mistaken item about his marriage, and cracked that Walter had a "hole in his soul".
  • FIFTIES
  • 1957
    Age 59
    He starred in The Walter Winchell File, a television crime drama series that initially aired from 1957 to 1958, dramatizing cases from the New York City Police Department that were covered in the New York Daily Mirror.
    More Details Hide Details ABC re-hired him in 1959 to narrate The Untouchables for four seasons.
  • 1955
    Age 57
    His weekly radio broadcast was simulcast on ABC television until he ended that association because of a dispute with ABC executives in 1955.
    More Details Hide Details
  • 1948
    Age 50
    During World War II, he attacked the National Maritime Union, the labor organization for the civilian United States Merchant Marine which he said was run by Communists. In 1948 and 1949, he and influential leftist columnist Drew Pearson "inaccurately and maliciously assaulted Secretary of Defense James Forrestal in columns and radio broadcasts."
    More Details Hide Details During the 1950s, Winchell supported Senator Joseph McCarthy's quest to identify Communists in the entertainment industry, but his popularity and influence began to decline as the public turned against McCarthy.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1937
    Age 39
    One example of his profile at his professional peak was being mentioned in Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart's 1937 song "The Lady Is a Tramp": "I follow Winchell, and read every line."
    More Details Hide Details Winchell was Jewish and was one of the first commentators in America to attack Adolf Hitler and American pro-fascist and pro-Nazi organizations such as the German-American Bund. He was a staunch supporter of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal throughout the Depression era, and frequently served as the Roosevelt Administration's mouthpiece in favor of interventionism as the European war crisis loomed in the late 1930s. Early on, he denounced American isolationists as favoring appeasement of Hitler, and was explicit in his attacks on such prominent isolationists as Charles Lindbergh, whom he dubbed "The Lone Ostrich", and Gerald L. K. Smith, whom he denounced as "Gerald Lucifer KKKodfish Smith". Throughout the 1930s and 1940s, Winchell was also an outspoken supporter of "civil rights" for African Americans (which received heavy Jewish financial and organizational support), and frequently attacked the Ku Klux Klan and other racist groups as supporting un-American, pro-German goals. After World War II, Winchell began to denounce Communism as the main threat facing America.
  • 1930
    Age 32
    His Sunday night radio broadcast was heard by another 20 million people from 1930 to the late 1950s.
    More Details Hide Details In 1948, Winchell had the top-rated radio show when he surpassed Fred Allen and Jack Benny.
    He made his radio debut over WABC in New York, a CBS affiliate, on May 12, 1930.
    More Details Hide Details The show entitled Saks on Broadway was a 15-minute feature that provided business news about Broadway. By the 1930s, Winchell was "an intimate friend of Owney Madden, New York's No. 1 gang leader of the prohibition era", but "in 1932 Winchell's intimacy with criminals caused him to fear he would be 'rubbed out' for 'knowing too much.'" He fled to California and "returned weeks later with a new enthusiasm for law, G-men, Uncle Sam, and Old Glory". His coverage of the Lindbergh kidnapping and subsequent trial received national attention. Within two years, he befriended J. Edgar Hoover, the No. 2 G-man of the repeal era. He was responsible for turning Louis "Lepke" Buchalter of Murder, Inc. over to Hoover. His newspaper column was syndicated in over 2,000 newspapers worldwide, and he was read by 50 million people a day from the 1920s until the early 1960s.
  • 1929
    Age 31
    He was hired on June 10, 1929 by the New York Daily Mirror where he finally became the author of the first syndicated gossip column, entitled On-Broadway.
    More Details Hide Details He used connections in the entertainment, social, and governmental realms to expose exciting or embarrassing information about celebrities in those industries. This caused him to become very feared as a journalist, because he would routinely affect the lives of famous or powerful people, exposing alleged information and rumors about them, using this as ammunition to attack his enemies and to blackmail influential people. He used this power, trading positive mention in his column (and later, his radio show) for more rumors and secrets.
  • 1928
    Age 30
    The couple separated a few years later, and he moved in with June Magee, who had already given birth to their first child, a daughter named Walda. Winchell and Greene eventually divorced in 1928.
    More Details Hide Details Winchell and Magee would never marry, although the couple maintained the front of being married for the rest of their lives. Winchell and Magee successfully kept the secret of their non-marriage. Their children all had misfortune. Their adopted daughter Gloria died of pneumonia at the age of nine, and Walda spent time in psychiatric hospitals.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1920
    Age 22
    He began his career in journalism by posting notes about his acting troupe on backstage bulletin boards. He joined the Vaudeville News in 1920, then left the paper for the Evening Graphic in 1924, where his column was named Mainly About Mainstreeters.
    More Details Hide Details
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1897
    Born
    Born on April 7, 1897.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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