Ward Kimball
Animator and director
Ward Kimball
Ward Walrath Kimball was an animator for the Walt Disney Studios. He was one of Walt Disney's team of animators known as Disney's Nine Old Men.
Biography
Ward Kimball's personal information overview.
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Photo Albums
Popular photos of Ward Kimball
Relationships
View family, career and love interests for Ward Kimball
News
News abour Ward Kimball from around the web
Meet a Local Cartoonist: A Chat with Marty Baumann - Washington City Paper (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
MB: Kirby, Kubert, Toth, Wally Wood, Disney greats like Ward Kimball, Little Golden Book artists such as Aurelius Battaglia (a HUGE influence), Antonio Prohias of Spy Vs. Spy fame (another HUGE influence on my commercial art) and probably most
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Google News article
Ward Kimball and UFOs - MousePlanet
Google News - over 5 years
What von Braun claims he saw is a topic for a different website even though he shared that information with animation director Ward Kimball. In the 1950s, the United States in particular was in the grip of flying saucer mania with multiple sightings,
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Google News article
Walt Disney's Secrets of Space - MousePlanet
Google News - over 5 years
It is well known that when director Ward Kimball embarked on making a Tomorrowland television episode for the weekly Disneyland television series about rockets and outer space, that he consulted these issues and, with Walt's approval, brought in some
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Google News article
Taking Pictures of Elvis on TV: How to Almost Break Google+ - The Atlantic
Google News - over 5 years
Directed by Disney animation legend Ward Kimball, the entire fifty-odd minute episode is actually quite boring, and television reviewers at the time weren't shy about saying as much. But those final nine minutes, when we're shown a shiny futuristic
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Google News article
Early American Toys, Firefighting Vehicles & Trains Race Past Their Estimates - Antiques and the Arts Online
Google News - over 5 years
A third Nineteenth Century American toy highlight in the sale was the Hull & Stafford "America" clockwork locomotive that came directly from the collection of Disney animator and train collector extraordinaire Ward Kimball (1914–2002)
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Google News article
The Osmond Brothers at Disneyland - MousePlanet
Google News - over 5 years
Wilson also has stories about working with Ward Kimball on the traveling show Disney on Parade. While many think the Dapper Dans were around since Disneyland opened, they actually did not start performing until 1957. Over the years there have been more
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Google News article
Auctions: Toys, decorative arts, furniture up for bids | Philadelphia Inquirer ... - Philadelphia Inquirer
Google News - almost 6 years
The sale also features the last of the toys from the collection of famed Disney cartoonist Ward Kimball, including two clockwork locomotives, antique valentines, a folk-art collection of figural smoking stands in such shapes as butlers, maids,
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Google News article
Auctioneer Noel Barrett Promises "Something for Everyone" in His May 21 Sale - Art Daily
Google News - almost 6 years
The last of the toys from the celebrated Ward Kimball collection will be auctioned. A Hull & Stafford “America” clockwork tin and wood locomotive is estimated at $3000-$4000; while a George Brown “Niagara” clockwork locomotive, also of tin and wood,
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Google News article
Why For: The Disney Princess royal processional that you almost got to see - Jim Hill Media.com (blog)
Google News - almost 6 years
Over the past 15 years, I've talked with a number of folks who had actively involved in this project, among them Disney Legends Marc Davis & Ward Kimball. But to get the definitive account of this abandoned "Fantasia 2000" sequence, I recently reached
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Google News article
Escape Artist
NYTimes - about 10 years
WALT DISNEY The Triumph of the American Imagination. By Neal Gabler. Illustrated. 851 pp. Alfred A. Knopf. $35. WALT DISNEY PICTURES must be the most enduring entertainment brand ever created. Look at the studio's peers, all forged, like Disney, in the 1910s or '20s. What does it mean, many decades later, to be a Warner Brothers picture, an MGM
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NYTimes article
Frank Thomas, 92, Animator Among Disney's '9 Old Men'
NYTimes - over 12 years
Frank Thomas, one of Walt Disney's trusted ''nine old men,'' who animated two dogs romantically nibbling a single strand of spaghetti in the 1955 Disney film ''Lady and the Tramp,'' died here on Wednesday. He was 92. Mr. Thomas died Wednesday at his home , said Howard E. Green of Buena Vista Pictures Marketing. In his 43-year history at Disney, Mr.
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NYTimes article
Animated Films Hit the Road to Win Love of Studios
NYTimes - over 13 years
Don Hertzfeldt, the young, amiable and highly praised director of a series of animated shorts featuring stick-figure protagonists, is vexed by the prospects of hand-drawn animation, especially the general studio response to the form. ''I really get frustrated with the studios because so many people just can't get past the word 'animation,' '' Mr.
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NYTimes article
Ward Kimball, Disney Animator, Dies at 88
NYTimes - over 14 years
Ward Kimball, a Disney animator who created Jiminy Cricket, updated Mickey Mouse and brought the crows to life in a famous scene in ''Dumbo,'' died on Monday in Arcadia, Calif. He was 88 and lived in San Gabriel, Calif. Mr. Kimball was hired by Walt Disney in 1934 and became part of his inner circle of animators, known jokingly as the ''nine old
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NYTimes article
TV WEEKEND; In His Kingdom, Sun Always Shines
NYTimes - over 15 years
''Walt: The Man Behind the Myth,'' a documentary about Walt Disney to celebrate the 100th anniversary of his birth, is what you might expect from a production assembled with the blessing of the Disney family (complete with home movies). Appearing this Sunday on ABC, a Disney-owned television network, it is a Disneyland-style biography, a sunny,
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NYTimes article
FILM; An American Icon Scampers In For a Makeover
NYTimes - over 21 years
THE RUMORS WERE TRUE. Mickey has had a mouse-lift. The beloved 67-year-old star took the big step in Paris at a Disney animation studio where he was filming "Runaway Brain," his first cartoon short in more than 40 years. Although public relations executives at the Walt Disney Company in Burbank, Calif., were hush-hush about the seven-minute film,
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NYTimes article
FILM; Disney's 'Old Men' Savor the Vintage Years
NYTimes - over 23 years
Ollie Johnston, Ward Kimball, Frank Thomas and Marc Davis have at last become what Walt Disney named them more than 40 years ago -- old men. The oldest, Mr. Thomas, turned 80 last September. The youngest, Mr. Kimball, is 79. They are all that remain of Disney's Nine Old Men, the group of brash young animators who cut their artistic teeth on the
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NYTimes article
Two Killed in the West As Small Planes Crash
NYTimes - about 29 years
LEAD: Two planes collided Saturday over this Los Angeles suburb, and two men aboard one plane were killed when it crashed, the authorities said. The other plane landed safely. Two planes collided Saturday over this Los Angeles suburb, and two men aboard one plane were killed when it crashed, the authorities said. The other plane landed safely.
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NYTimes article
NEW CASSETTES: FANTASY AND PARODY
NYTimes - almost 31 years
Mary Poppins Starring Julie Andrews, Dick Van Dyke, David Tomlinson, Glynis Johns, Hermione Baddeley, Elsa Lanchester, Arthur Treacher, Ed Wynn; directed by Robert Stevenson, 1964 (G) Walt Disney Home Video 139 minutes. $84.95 Even on the home screen, ''Mary Poppins'' is supercalifragilisticexpialidocious. Surprisingly, the lavish production holds
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NYTimes article
MAKING DRAWINGS MOVE
NYTimes - about 35 years
DISNEY ANIMATION The Illusion of Life. By Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston. Illustrated. 575 pp. New York: Abbeville Press. $49.95. BEFORE television became such a pervasive presence in American life, there were few shared experiences to rival the animated cartoon features of Walt Disney. How many people can there be in this land who have never seen
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NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Ward Kimball
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 2002
    Age 87
    Kimball died in 2002 in Los Angeles, California of complications from pneumonia at age 88.
    More Details Hide Details In 2005 the Disneyland Railroad named its newly acquired Engine №5 the "Ward Kimball" in his memory. The Academy Film Archive houses the Kimball Family Collection which includes over 60 home movie reels, as well as short films, TV spots, and jazz band performances, serving to document Ward’s personal interests and moments in his extraordinary career. The collection also includes home movies and shorts by his son, filmmaker and animator John Kimball.
  • 1992
    Age 77
    He hosted the second season of the 1992 PBS series Tracks Ahead.
    More Details Hide Details That season has since been repackaged to feature current host Spencer Christian. As recounted in Neal Gabler's biography of Walt Disney, Ward Kimball was a key figure in spreading the urban legend that Disney had left instructions for his body to be preserved by cryonics after his death. Amid Amidi wrote a biography of Kimball, Full Steam Ahead: The Life and Art of Ward Kimball that was projected for publication in the fall of 2012. However, publication of the biography was cancelled in February 2013, which Amidi believed was due to pressure from the Disney corporation. Note: At the time these films were produced it was common for one animator to animate every single character in the shot. Along with his employer and friend Walt Disney, and friend Ollie Johnston, Kimball collected old railroad ephemera. He was an avid railway enthusiast and donated his narrow gauge collection to the Orange Empire Railway Museum (OERM) in Perris, California. A full-size steam locomotive, which Kimball ran on his private backyard railroad known as "Grizzly Flats Railroad" in San Gabriel, California, bears some of his original artwork on the headlamp and cab, and is on permanent display at the museum. Kimball's roundhouse also included two small steam engines that had been used on sugar cane plantations, one of which was his and the other was owned by his friend, noted railroad historian Gerald M. Best.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1974
    Age 59
    Kimball continued to work at Disney until 1974, working on the Disney anthology television series, being one of the writers for Babes in Toyland, creating animation for Mary Poppins, directing the animation for Bedknobs and Broomsticks, and working on titles for feature films such as The Adventures Of Bullwhip Griffin and Million Dollar Duck.
    More Details Hide Details His last staff work for Disney was producing and directing the Disney TV show The Mouse Factory, which ran from 1972 to 1974. He continued to do various projects on his own, even returning to do some publicity tours for the Disney corporation. He also worked on the World of Motion attraction for Disney's EPCOT Center. Kimball also produced two editions of a volume titled Art Afterpieces, in which he revised various well-known works of art, such as putting Mona Lisas hair up in curlers, showing Whistler's Mother watching TV, and adding a Communist flag and Russian boots to Pinkie. These masterpiece remixes are thought to have been appropriated by the street artist Banksy. While his only two acting appearances on film were an uncredited role as a jazz musician (with his Firehouse Five Plus Two) in Hit Parade of 1951 and as an IRS Chief in Mike Jittlov's The Wizard of Speed and Time, Kimball served as host of the "Man in Space" and "Man and the Moon" episodes of Disneyland in 1955 and 1956 respectively. He appeared as himself in an episode of the popular TV show You Bet Your Life hosted by Groucho Marx on March 18, 1954, which has been released on DVD.
  • 1973
    Age 58
    According to Jeff Lenburg, Kimball retired in 1973 and left the Disney studio.
    More Details Hide Details He continued, however, to serve as a consultant on special assignments. He worked on the World of Motion attraction for Disney's EPCOT Center. Kimball was profiled by producer Jerry Fairbanks in his Paramount Pictures film short series Unusual Occupations. This 35mm Magnacolor film short was released theatrically in 1944; it focused on Kimball's backyard railroad and full-sized locomotive. Kimball was also a jazz trombonist. He founded and led the seven-piece Dixieland band Firehouse Five Plus Two, in which he played trombone. The band made at least 13 LP records and toured clubs, college campuses and jazz festivals from the 1940s to early 1970s. Kimball once said that Walt Disney permitted the second career as long as it did not interfere with his animation work. Kimball appeared on the March 17, 1954 episode of You Bet Your Life, where Groucho Marx coaxed him into playing his trombone with the house band. He and his partner won $75 in their quiz portion of the show, including one Disney animation question that Kimball answered easily.
  • FORTIES
  • 1962
    Age 47
    Around 1962, it started being shown in Disneyland.
    More Details Hide Details During the 1950s, the Disney studio shifted its focus from theatrical animation to television. Kimball wrote and directed three hour-long television shows about space exploration. They were Man in Space (1955), Man and the Moon (1955), and Mars and Beyond (1957). The consultants for these shows included pioneers of the Space Age, such as aerospace engineer Wernher von Braun. According to animation historian Jeff Lenburg, the three shows helped in sparking popular interest in spaceflight. Kimball was also responsible for the science-fiction two-reel cartoon Cosmic Capers (1957). Kimball also worked (as a writer) on the live-action film Babes in Toyland (1961), a musical film. He later returned to television and directed 43 episodes of The Mouse Factory (1972-1973).
  • TWENTIES
  • 1936
    Age 21
    In 1936, Kimball was promoted to an animator in his own right.
    More Details Hide Details He continued to work in the Silly Symphony series. Some of his memorable credits in this position include the animated short films Toby Tortoise Returns (1936), More Kittens (1936), and Mother Goose Goes Hollywood (1938). His first solo effort as an animator was animating a grasshopper turned musician in Woodland Café (1937). Kimball was included in the team of animators known later as Disney's Nine Old Men, whose original task was animating Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937). The film was the first full-length animated feature film by the Disney studio. Kimball spend months working on the sequence animation for a scene where the Seven Dwarfs are eating soup, prepared for them by Snow White. Following the release of Snow White, Kimball was promoted to a supervising or directing animator. He would remain in this position until his retirement in the 1970s. His employer Walt Disney was sufficiently satisfied with Kimball's work that he entrusted him with designing new character Jiminy Cricket. The character was intended for use in the Disney studio's next feature film, Pinocchio. It took Kimball 12 or 14 drafts before completing his final design of Jiminy. Kimball told one interviewer that he "hated" animating Jiminy Cricket: "I got sick of drawing that oval head looking in every direction.") Kimball's next major task was designing the sympathetic Crows in Dumbo (1941). Following the example of the Seven Dwarfs from Snow White, Kimball had to give each crow a distinct appearance and character.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1934
    Age 19
    In April 1934, he was hired as an inbetweener.
    More Details Hide Details He was then promoted to an assistant animator. He served as an assistant to animator Hamilton Luske. Kimball worked primarily in the Silly Symphony series, where his film credits include the animated short films The Wise Little Hen (1934), The Goddess of Spring (1934), and The Tortoise and the Hare (1935). He also worked on the Mickey Mouse series, where his film credits include the short film Orphan's Benefit (1934).
    In March 1934, a 20-year-old Kimball applied for a job at the Disney studio.
    More Details Hide Details
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1914
    Born
    Born on March 4, 1914.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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