Warren Oates
Actor
Warren Oates
Warren Mercer Oates was an American actor best known for his performances in several films directed by Sam Peckinpah including The Wild Bunch (1969) and Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia (1974). He starred in numerous films during the early 1970s which have since achieved cult status including The Hired Hand (1971), Two-Lane Blacktop (1971) and Race with the Devil (1975).
Biography
Warren Oates's personal information overview.
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Kill List – review - The Guardian
Google News - over 5 years
The films that immediately come to my mind are a British film that everyone knows, The Wicker Man, and a less familiar American picture I greatly admire, Jack Starrett's Race With the Devil, in which Peter Fonda and Warren Oates have satanic encounters
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The premiere of Steve McQueen's 'Wanted: Dead or Alive,' feat. Michael Landon - Examiner.com
Google News - over 5 years
Other Character Actors - And Was That Warren Oates? If you notice, Dabbs Greer portrays "Tom Wade," the citizen who is forced to retrieved Randall's horse. Appearing in over 300 character roles in his amazing 54-year career, Greer finally found
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Wednesday Western: 'Ride in the Whirlwind' - Cowboys and Indians (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
... Hellman and Nicholson shot back-to-back – for producer Roger Corman – on location in Utah back in '65. The other one: The Shooting, a dark drama co-starring Millie Perkins (who also appears in Whirlwind), Will Hutchins and the late, great Warren Oates
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Warner Bros. moving on 'Wild Bunch' reboot - Monsters and Critics.com
Google News - over 5 years
The original, which starred William Holden, Robert Ryan, Ernest Borgnine, Ben Johnson and Warren Oates, centered on a group of aging, worn, hard-edged outlaws on the Texas-Mexico border who are bound by a code of honor, a past, and a friendship
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70s Rewind: DILLINGER - Twitch
Google News - over 5 years
1, played by the great Warren Oates. "I may not live forever, but I'd be a damn fool not to try." Oates plays Dillinger with relish, as a brutish, brazen, cocky criminal who's determined to squeeze every ounce of juice out of life
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Tony Scott Remaking Wild Bunch - Mania
Google News - over 5 years
Ben Johnson, Warren Oates, William Holden and Ernest Borgnine in Sam Peckinpah's THE WILD BUNCH(1969). It seems to be a ScottFree type of day in terms of high-profile projects out of Warner Bros. Pictures. ... - -
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Warner Bros. develops 'Wild Bunch' reboot - Variety
Google News - over 5 years
Jesse Ehrman is overseeing the project for Warners The original, set in 1913 in Texas and Mexico, starred William Holden, Robert Ryan, Ernest Borgnine, Ben Johnson and Warren Oates in a story of a gang of aging outlaws ambushed during a robbery who
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DVD; How Crimes Have Changed
NYTimes - over 5 years
JUST as hemlines rise and fall, so do fashions in crime -- or, at least, its fictional representation -- evolve from decade to decade and even from year to year. Bracketing the 1950s a group of four crime films recently released by the Warner Archive Collection suggest just how radical those shifts can be. A pair of films from 1949, Richard O.
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Donnie Fritts Will Bring You the Head of Alfredo Garcia — Tomorrow at Belcourt - Nashville Scene
Google News - over 5 years
It's playing as part of a double bill (in The Belcourt's "Road Movies of the 1970s & '80s" series) honoring the late Warren Oates, whom Fritts remembers fondly as both a collaborator and friend. "I loved Warren Oates," Fritts said the other day in a
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Two vintage sicko road movies at The Belcourt provide a seedy showcase for the ... - Nashville Scene
Google News - over 5 years
Satanists, gangsters, Winnebagos, severed heads and the late Warren Oates, the single most baddest mofo American cinema has ever produced — The Belcourt hits ramming speed this weekend with possibly the finest pairing since rubber
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Notable 1980s comedy titles from the Netflix Watch Instantly world - Weekly Alibi (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The two then find themselves in a diverse platoon led by Sergeant Hulka (Warren Oates), and with his hilariously defiant attitude, Winger becomes the platoon's black sheep quite easily. But when Sgt. Hulka suddenly gets injured, Winger has to acquire
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Maverick Monte Hellman makes a road trip to Harvard - Boston Globe
Google News - over 5 years
“Two-Lane Blacktop'' kicks off the series Friday at 7 pm Starring singer James Taylor and Warren Oates, one of Hellman's favorite actors, “Two-Lane Blacktop'' is considered by many to be one of the great American films in the last gasp of '60s
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The Belcourt's road-movie retro puts the viewer in the driver's seat - Nashville Scene
Google News - over 5 years
A movie like Monte Hellman's Two-Lane Blacktop, banished to double bills in 1971, is a rolling time capsule of Vietnam-era alienation, as emblematic of its period as Warren Oates or his candy-colored GTO. Oates, that giant among character actors who
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Monte Hellman Speaks on Road to Nowhere, His Career, and the State of US ... - SF Weekly (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
In the 1970s, Hellman defined himself with Two-Lane Blacktop, Cockfighter, and China 9, Liberty 37 -- all of which co-starred Hellman's friend Warren Oates. Since then, Hellman's filmography has been sparse but memorable, particularly the unusual
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TV Q&A with David Inman - Boston Herald
Google News - over 5 years
He wasn't in the 1969 film version with Wayne. He made several movies with Wayne, but “True Grit” wasn't one. There was a 1978 TV movie of “True Grit,” but not with Boone. The role of Rooster Cogburn was played by Warren Oates
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Warren Oates
    FIFTIES
  • 1982
    Age 53
    In 1982 he co-starred opposite Jack Nicholson in director Tony Richardson's The Border.
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  • 1981
    Age 52
    A year before his death, Oates co-starred with Bill Murray in the 1981 military comedy Stripes.
    More Details Hide Details In the role of the drill sergeant, Sgt. Hulka, Oates skillfully played the straight man to Murray's comedic character. The film was a huge financial success, earning $85 million at the box office.
  • FORTIES
  • 1971
    Age 42
    Although the Peckinpah film roles are his best-known, his most critically acclaimed role is GTO in Monte Hellman's 1971 cult classic Two-Lane Blacktop.
    More Details Hide Details The film, although a failure at the box-office, is studied in film schools as a treasure of the 1970s, in large part due to Oates' heartbreaking portrayal of GTO. Famed film critic Leonard Maltin remarked that Oates' performance in this film was as good as any he'd seen and should have won the Oscar.
    He appeared in the Sherman Brothers musical version of Tom Sawyer as "Muff Potter," the town drunk. He also starred in The Rise and Fall of Legs Diamond (1960), Return of the Seven (1966), The Shooting (filmed in 1965, released in 1968), The Split (1968), The Thief Who Came to Dinner (1973), Cockfighter (1974), Drum (1976) and China 9, Liberty 37 (1978), and played the title role in a 1971 crime drama, Chandler.
    More Details Hide Details Oates co-starred three times with friend Peter Fonda in The Hired Hand (1971), Race with the Devil (1975) and 92 in the Shade (1975). While making a guest appearance on a segment of Dundee and the Culhane, Oates managed to steal the show with his off-camera antics and bloopers that had everyone on the set rolling. After a long day of filming, he headed over and set his footprints in cement along with all the other stars who appeared at Apacheland Movie Ranch. It was during this time that In the Heat of the Night was a blockbuster summer flick. Oates played Officer Sam Wood, a peeping-tom policeman and possible killer in the critically acclaimed, Oscar-winning film. Oates was cast in Roger Donaldson's 1977 New Zealand film Sleeping Dogs together with New Zealand actor Sam Neill. A political thriller with action film elements, Sleeping Dogs follows the lead character "Smith" (Neill) as New Zealand plunges into a police state, as a fascist government institutes martial law after industrial disputes flare into violence. Smith gets caught between the special police and a growing resistance movement and reluctantly becomes involved. Oates plays the role of "Willoughby," commander of the American forces stationed in New Zealand and working with the New Zealand fascist government to find and subdue "rebels" (the resistance movement).
  • 1969
    Age 40
    His partnership with Peckinpah resulted in two of his most famous film roles. In the 1969 Western classic The Wild Bunch, he portrayed Lyle Gorch, a long-time outlaw who chooses to die with his friends during the film's violent conclusion.
    More Details Hide Details According to his wife at the time, Teddy, Oates had the choice of starring in Support Your Local Sheriff!, to be filmed in Los Angeles, or The Wild Bunch in Mexico. "He had done Return of the Seven in Mexico; he got hepatitis, plus dysentery. But off he went again with Sam Peckinpah. He loved going on location. He loved the adventure of it. He had great admiration for Sam. Sam Peckinpah and Monte Hellman were the two directors Warren would work with anytime, anywhere." In Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia, the dark 1974 action/tragedy also filmed in Mexico, Oates played the lead role of Bennie, a hard-drinking down-on-his-luck musician and bartender hoping to make a final score. The character was reportedly based on Peckinpah himself. For authenticity, Oates wore the director's sunglasses while filming scenes of the production.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1962
    Age 33
    In 1962 he appeared as "Ves Painter" in the short-lived ABC series Stoney Burke, co-starring Jack Lord, a program about rodeo contestants.
    More Details Hide Details Oates also played in a number of guest roles on The Twilight Zone (in "The Purple Testament" and "The 7th Is Made Up of Phantoms," in which he costarred with Randy Boone and Ron Foster), The Outer Limits ("The Mutant" 1964), Combat! ("The Pillbox" 1964) and Lost in Space ("Welcome Stranger" 1965). During the 1960s and 1970s, he guest-starred on such shows as Twelve O'Clock High ("The Hotshot" 1965), Lancer, and The Virginian. In addition to Peckinpah, Oates worked with several major directors of his era, including Leslie Stevens in the 1960 film Private Property, his first starring role; Norman Jewison in In the Heat of the Night (1967); Joseph L. Mankiewicz in There Was a Crooked Man (1970); John Milius in Dillinger (1973); Terrence Malick in Badlands (1973); Philip Kaufman in The White Dawn (1974); William Friedkin in The Brink's Job (1978); and Steven Spielberg in 1941 (1979).
  • 1961
    Age 32
    In 1961 Oates guest-starred in the episode "Artie Moon" in NBC's The Lawless Years crime drama about the 1920s.
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  • 1960
    Age 31
    He also played a supporting role in Peckinpah's short-lived series The Westerner in 1960.
    More Details Hide Details The collaboration continued as he worked on Peckinpah's early films Ride the High Country (1962) and Major Dundee (1965). "There were 40 western series, and I went from one to the other. I started out playing the third bad guy on a horse and worked my way up to the No. 1 bad guy," Oates once quipped. In the episode "Subterranean City" (October 14, 1958) of the syndicated Rescue 8, Oates played a gang member, Pete, who is the nephew of series character Skip Johnson (Lang Jeffries). In the story line, rescuers Johnson and Wes Cameron (Jim Davis) search for a lost girl in the sewer tunnels and encounter three criminals hiding out underground. Pete soon breaks with his gang companions and joins the firemen Wes and Skip in locating the missing child.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1957
    Age 28
    He got an opportunity in New York City to star in a live production of the television series, Studio One in 1957.
    More Details Hide Details Oates moved to Los Angeles, where he began to establish himself in guest roles in Western television series, including Wagon Train, Tombstone Territory, Buckskin, Rawhide, Trackdown, Tate, The Rebel, Wanted: Dead or Alive, Have Gun – Will Travel, Lawman, The Big Valley and Gunsmoke. Oates first met Peckinpah when he played a variety of guest roles on The Rifleman (1958–63), a popular television series created by the director.
  • 1953
    Age 24
    He became interested in theater at the University of Louisville and starred in several plays there in 1953 for the Little Theater Company.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1945
    Age 16
    He attended Louisville Male High School in Louisville, Kentucky, until 1945 but did not graduate.
    More Details Hide Details He later earned a high school equivalency diploma. After high school he enlisted in the United States Marine Corps for two years serving in the air wing as an aircraft mechanic.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1928
    Born
    Born on July 5, 1928.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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