William II
American racing driver
William II
William Kissam Vanderbilt II was a motor racing enthusiast and yachtsman and a member of the prominent United States Vanderbilt family.
Biography
William Kissam Vanderbilt II's personal information overview.
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Popular photos of William Kissam Vanderbilt II
News
News abour William Kissam Vanderbilt II from around the web
Opinion: Pasta and minarets - Egyptian Gazette
Google News - over 5 years
The Norman King, William II, founded a Benedictine monastery here and began to embellish the church. Built between 1174 and 1185, the Cathedral of Monreale was to become one of the world's most magnificent. Whilst on the outside, the Cathedral of
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'You are letting the nation down on Herero genocide' - The Southern Times
Google News - over 5 years
It is very saddening to witness a good relationship between the revolutionary government of Namibia and the pro-imperialist government of Germany to a level of comradeship despite the genocide and atrocities committed by Kaizer William II between 1890
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The Weekend Quiz - The Guardian
Google News - over 5 years
13 Nicknames of medieval kings of England: William II; Henry I; Henry II; John; Edward I. 14 First football shirt sponsors: Arsenal; Liverpool; Man U; Everton; Spurs; Chelsea. 15 Woodstock: W Palace; 1969 W Festival; W in Peanuts strip. Ed Moses
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Onle “Buck” Shultz - Wheeling Intelligencer
Google News - over 5 years
... daughters, Nedra (William) McKinley of Follansbee, W.Va., Pamela (Tony) Castillo, Tina Marie (Robert) Kitchen, and Sharon Shultz Hart, all of Weirton; brother Stanley (Shelby) Shultz of Middlebourne, W.Va.; and grandchildren William II (Terrie),
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Near Berlin, Nature and Culture Mix on Peacock Island - New York Times (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
King Frederick William II of Prussia (1744-1797) even had a summer palace built for him and his mistress on the island, designed to imitate a castle ruin, complete with a false stone facade. These days, a rotating program of music- and
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Loosed by tornado, love letter returned to original recipient - Joplin Globe
Google News - over 5 years
Their first child, John William II, was born in February 1967 and now lives in Oronogo. Diane, their second, was born in 1968 — on May 22. She's now a chaplain in the Navy, based in Panama City, Fla. In 1970, Hampton would deploy to Vietnam
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Birth announcements - Alexandria Town Talk
Google News - over 5 years
CRIPPS: To William II and Crystal Heard of Harrisonburg, daughter, Alyssa Paige, 6 lbs.5 1/2 oz. GARDNER: To Donovan Sr. and Emerald Watson of Alexandria, twins, a daughter, Kai Marie, 4 lbs., and a son, Cole Cottrell, 5 lbs. 12 1/2 oz
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Shunning the Journals, Scholar Brings Work on Older Gays to Life in Film
NYTimes - over 5 years
LONDON -- Kip Jones hates PowerPoint presentations. He doesn't care much for academic journals, either. An American-born sociologist, who teaches in the school of health and social care at Bournemouth University in England, Mr. Jones says that ''the shame of research is that you spend a lot of money and the knowledge just disappears -- or worse,
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Germany's phase out of nuclear power: The pathos of national unity - World Socialist Web Site
Google News - over 5 years
When Germany entered in the First World War and the SPD voted to fund the German war effort in 1914, German Emperor William II declared, “I recognise parties no more, I recognise only Germans.” Today the pathos of national unity is designed to prepare
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Stop the griping and enjoy the royals 0 - Toronto Sun
Google News - over 5 years
Fourth son of William the Conqueror, Henry became king in 1100 after his brother William II's "hunting accident". As part of a policy of reconciling the new Norman ruling class and the Saxon/Celtic population, Henry married into the Saxon royal line
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Small is profitable - Yorkshire Post (press release)
Google News - over 5 years
Lonely Charlotte, who rarely saw her mother, was pressured by her father to marry William, Prince of Orange, later William II of the Netherlands, but after initially accepting him she broke off the engagement, resulting in friction between father and
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LeMire family in June Hall of Fame spotlight - Escanaba Daily Press
Google News - over 5 years
During this time, eight children would be born to the LeMires: a daughter, Myrtle, in 1902, followed by Loretta Lola, William II, Dorothy, Catherine, Robert, Donald and Margaret. Tragically Dr LeMire died on March 2, 1931, when he was electrocuted by
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Scotland's highest peaks tower over the rown - Aberdeen Press and Journal
Google News - over 5 years
A large timber fort was built by Oliver Cromwell, then replaced by a stone fort named Fort William after King William II. It was used to house Redcoat soldiers sent to keep unruly Highlanders in check and withstood a siege during the Jacobite rebellion
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FC Twente Enschede have reached agreement with Co Adriaanse for the coaching ... - bettor.com (blog)
Google News - over 5 years
The highlight of Dutch trainer leading Eredivisie sides was when he guided William II to a UEFA Champions League berth in 1998/99 season and guided AZ up to UEFA Cup semi-final in 2005. Since 2005, the Dutchman has worked abroad with FC Porto,
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Europe's cracked foundation - CanadianBusiness.com
Google News - over 5 years
Bismarck unified Germany, and William II squandered that union. Hitler unified Germany and then waged aggressive war on almost all his neighbours and even the United States, and Germany was occupied and fragmented again. The Tehran Conference in 1943
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Frank Turner: England Keep My Bones – review - The Guardian
Google News - over 5 years
"Rivers" is a paean to his homeland, "Wessex Boy" honours his home town (Winchester) and "English Curse" offers an a cappella account of William II's death. Dylan, Springsteen and Presley also get a nod, though the singer Turner most resembles is Billy
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To British Parliament, President Obama Heralds US/UK Exceptionalism - ABC News (blog)
Google News - almost 6 years
Customarily, only monarchs address both Houses of Parliament in the Hall, originally built in 1097 under William II (Rufus), the son of William the Conqueror. President Obama was only the 4th foreign leader since World War II to speak in Westminster,
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CRIME; Mind Over Murder
NYTimes - almost 7 years
There are eerie echoes of Barbara Vine in THE EXECUTOR (Putnam, $25.95), Jesse Kellerman's stunning novel of psychological suspense: the clinical dissection of a mind that refuses to examine itself; the disintegration of moral boundaries when such a mind develops a fixation; the macabre humor of people who think too much; and, most unnerving, a
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of William Kissam Vanderbilt II
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1944
    Age 65
    Vanderbilt died on January 8, 1944 of a heart ailment and was interred in the family mausoleum at the Moravian Cemetery on Staten Island, New York.
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  • 1941
    Age 62
    The Alva was donated by Vanderbilt to the U.S. Navy on November 4, 1941.
    More Details Hide Details The Alva was converted to a gunboat and commissioned as the USS Plymouth (PG-57) on December 29, 1941. The Plymouth was primarily employed as a convoy escort on the East Coast and in the Caribbean and was sunk by a torpedo from a German U-boat on August 4, 1943.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1933
    Age 54
    In 1933, tragedy struck the Vanderbilt family when his 26-year-old son, William Kissam III, was killed in an automobile accident in South Carolina while driving home to New York City from his father's Florida estate.
    More Details Hide Details His son had inherited his father's love of fast cars and exotic travel and in his memory, Willie K. Vanderbilt added a new wing to his Eagle's Nest home in Long Island to house memorabilia, trophies, and souvenirs including those from his son's African safaris. He then opened the estate for public viewing several days a week and organized his will so that upon his death the Eagle's Nest property along with a $2 million upkeep fund would be given to Suffolk County, New York to serve as a public museum, the Vanderbilt Museum.
  • 1931
    Age 52
    In 1931 Vanderbilt had the Krupp shipyard in Keil, Germany build for him the 264 foot steam yacht Alva.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1927
    Age 48
    However, the Vanderbilts separated after ten years of marriage but did not formally divorce until 1927 when he wanted to remarry.
    More Details Hide Details Divorce proceedings were handled by his New York lawyers while he and Rosamund Lancaster Warburton (1897–1947), a former wife of Barclay Harding Warburton II, an heir to the John Wanamaker department store fortune, waited discreetly away from the media at a home in the Parisian suburb of Passy, France. When the divorce matters were complete, the couple were married at the Hotel de Ville (city hall) in Paris. He became a legal stepfather to Barclay Harding Warburton III once they wed.
  • 1925
    Age 46
    In 1925 he traded the luxury yacht Eagle for ownership of Fisher Island, Florida, a place he used as a winter residence.
    More Details Hide Details He built a mansion complete with docking facilities for his yacht, a seaplane hangar, tennis courts, swimming pool, and an eleven-hole golf course. This home was called Alva Base and the architect was Maurice Fatio. In addition to this property, and his Long Island estate, Vanderbilt also owned a farm in Tennessee and Kedgwick Lodge, a hunting lodge designed for his father by architect Stanford White, on the Restigouche River in New Brunswick, Canada.
  • 1920
    Age 41
    Already extremely wealthy from a trust fund and from his income as president of the New York Central Railroad Company, on his father's death in 1920, Willie K. Vanderbilt inherited a multimillion-dollar fortune.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1917
    Age 38
    On October 1, 1917 he was released from active duty and given a temporary leave of absence to resume his duties of vice-president of the New York Central Railroad.
    More Details Hide Details A few months later was elected president of the New York Central Railroad and acted in this capacity for the remainder of the war. After the war, Vanderbilt was promoted to the rank of lieutenant commander in the Naval Reserve on May 17, 1921. He remained in the Naval Reserve until he was transferred to the Honorary Retired List on January 1, 1941 for physical disability.
  • 1910
    Age 31
    His new high-speed road complemented a train service that allowed a rapid exit from Manhattan. Becoming the first suburban automobile commuter, in 1910 Willie K. Vanderbilt began work on the much more elaborate and costly "Eagle's Nest" estate at Centerport, Long Island.
    More Details Hide Details An avid collector of natural history and marine specimens as well as other anthropological objects, he traveled extensively aboard his yacht as well as overland to numerous destinations around the globe. He acquired a vast array of artifacts for his collection during his well-documented travels and after service with the United States Navy during World War I, he published a book titled "A Trip Through Sicily, Tunisia, Algeria, and Southern France." A few years later, he engaged a curator from the American Museum of Natural History to participate with him in a scientific voyage to the Galapagos Islands.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1906
    Age 27
    The Vanderbilt Cup auto races repeatedly had crowd control problems and at the 1906 race a spectator was killed.
    More Details Hide Details Seeing the potential to solve the safety issue as well as improve attendance to his race, Willie K. Vanderbilt formed a corporation to build the Long Island Motor Parkway, one of the country's first modern paved parkways that could not only be used for the race but would open up Long Island for easy access and economic development. Construction began in 1907 of the multimillion-dollar toll highway that was to run from the Kissena Corridor in Queens County over numerous bridges and overpasses to Lake Ronkonkoma, a distance of. However, the toll road was never able to generate sustainable profits and in 1938 it was formally ceded to the county governments in lieu of the $80,000 due in back taxes.
  • 1905
    Age 26
    As such, in 1905 he joined other Vanderbilts on Fifth Avenue, building a townhouse at number 666.
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  • 1904
    Age 25
    In 1904, Willie K. Vanderbilt set a new land speed record of in a Mercedes at the Daytona Beach Road Course at Ormond Beach, Florida.
    More Details Hide Details That same year, he launched the Vanderbilt Cup, the first major trophy in American auto racing. An international event, designed to spur American manufacturers into racing, the race's large cash prize drew the top drivers and their vehicles from across the Atlantic Ocean who had competed in Europe's Gordon Bennett Cup. Held at a course set out in Nassau County on Long Island, New York, the race drew large crowds hoping to see an American car defeat the mighty European vehicles. However, a French Panhard vehicle won the race and fans would have to wait until 1908 when 23-year-old George Robertson of Garden City, New York became the first American to win the Vanderbilt Cup. While a great part of his life was filled with travel and leisure activities, Willie K. Vanderbilt's father put him to work at the family's New York Central Railroad offices at Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan.
  • 1902
    Age 23
    In 1902, Vanderbilt began construction on his own country place at Lake Success on Long Island that he named "Deepdale."
    More Details Hide Details However, sailing would take second place to his enthusiasm for fast cars.
  • 1900
    Age 21
    A skilled sailor, he participated in yacht racing, winning the Sir Thomas Lipton Cup in 1900 with his new yacht he had named Virginia in honor of his new bride.
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  • 1899
    Age 20
    In 1899, Vanderbilt married Virginia Graham Fair (1875–1935), a wealthy heiress whose father, James Graham Fair had made a fortune in mining the famous Comstock Lode.
    More Details Hide Details They spent their honeymoon at the Idle Hour estate but disaster struck when fire broke out and the mansion burned to the ground. Vanderbilt and his wife had a son, William Kissam Vanderbilt III and daughters Muriel and Consuelo Vanderbilt Earl, the latter named for her aunt.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1898
    Age 19
    Although he developed an interest in horse racing and yachting, he was totally fascinated with automobiles. At age 10, during a stay in the south of France he had ridden in a steam-powered tricycle from Beaulieu-sur-Mer the 7 kilometers to Monte Carlo and as a twenty-year-old, in 1898 he ordered a French De Dion-Bouton motor tricycle and had it shipped to New York.
    More Details Hide Details Soon, he acquired other motorized vehicles and before long began to infuriate citizens and officials alike as he sped furiously through the towns and villages of Long Island, New York en route to Idle Hour, his parents' summer estate at Oakdale.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1878
    Born
    He was born on October 26, 1878 in New York City, the second child and first son of William Kissam Vanderbilt and Alva Erskine Smith.
    More Details Hide Details Known as Willie K., he was a brother to Harold Stirling Vanderbilt and Consuelo Vanderbilt. Born to a life of luxury, he was raised in Vanderbilt mansions, traveled to Europe frequently, and sailed the globe on yachts owned by his father. Willie K. Vanderbilt was educated by tutors and at St. Mark's School. He attended Harvard University but dropped out after two years. On May 9, 1917, Vanderbilt went into active service in the Navy as a lieutenant (junior grade) in command of USS Tarantula (SP-124) at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. The Tarantula was a yacht owned by Vanderbilt which he has leased to the Navy for the duration of the war. He was assigned to patrol duty in the waters of the 3rd Naval District and performed convoy escorts in the waters off New York and New Jersey.
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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