William Kissam Vanderbilt
United States railroad manager and horse breeder
William Kissam Vanderbilt
William Kissam Vanderbilt was a member of the prominent American Vanderbilt family. He managed railroads and was a horse breeder.
Biography
William Kissam Vanderbilt's personal information overview.
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Popular photos of William Kissam Vanderbilt
News
News abour William Kissam Vanderbilt from around the web
La naissance du sport automobile - SportVox
Google News - over 5 years
Disputée à Long Island, dans l'état de New York, elle fut créée à l'initiative de William Vanderbilt, héritier de la famille Vanderbilt, dont le patriarche Cornelius Vanderbilt, parmi les plus riches de l'Histoire des Etats-Unis avec John Rockefeller,
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Brownstone: The Imperishable Product of the Jurassic Age - Patch.com
Google News - over 5 years
George Pullman's home in Chicago was also made from brownstone, as was William Vanderbilt's palatial home on Fifth Avenue in New York City. In fact, of the more than 9100 brownstone buildings in the Big Apple in 1880, about 80 percent of them were 100
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EDITORIAL | SUNDAY IN THE CITY; Have You Picnicked at the Tank Farm?
NYTimes - over 5 years
Back when colonial New Yorkers first sweltered in their budding city, one peppercorn per year was the bargain fee negotiated for renting Gotham’s first official park, Bowling Green, in 1733. There were grandiose municipal plans to add grass, trees and a wooden fence “for the Recreation and Delight of the Inhabitants of this City.”
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‘New’ Madison Square Garden Opens - Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Google News - over 5 years
It was built to replace a grimy, drafty Garden opened by William Vanderbilt on May 31, 1879, and demolished in 1889. The new building was designed in a Moorish style by Stanford White and erected at a cost of $1 million. It was topped by a reproduction
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Preserving Nassau's motoring past - liherald.com
Google News - over 5 years
The trail will follow part of the old Vanderbilt Motor Parkway, a once private toll road built by wealthy entrepreneur William Vanderbilt in 1908. The parkway remained in the Vanderbilt family's hands until 1938, when the state took possession of it in
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SUMMER FUN: Area attractions - Fall River Herald News
Google News - almost 6 years
Marble House, Bellevue Avenue, Newport, RI, was designed by architect Richard Morris Hunt for William Vanderbilt, who presented the deed to the house to his wife, Alva, as a 39th birthday present. The grounds include a colorful Chinese teahouse
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Cleaned-up governor portraits on display - Providence Journal
Google News - almost 6 years
... Island's original royal charter (and whose portrait was painted posthumously by the 19th-century artist Frederic S. Batcheller); and a portrait of William Vanderbilt (1839-1941) by former Rhode Island School of Design president John R. Frazier
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BOOKS OF THE TIMES; How Economic Brawn Transformed a Nation
NYTimes - over 6 years
AMERICAN COLOSSUS The Triumph of Capitalism, 1865-1900 By H. W. Brands Illustrated. 614 pages. Doubleday. $35. It has often been noted that while the American union was established by the Revolution, the American nation was forged only upon the awful anvil of the Civil War. Far less noted, however, is that this nation's extraordinary power and
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Chateau in the Sky
NYTimes - about 10 years
THE coming-out party for the palatial penthouse restaurant of the Hotel Pierre was a chilly one. On a blustery February afternoon in 1930, a genteel hotel impresario named Charles Pierre Casalasco led a hardy troupe of debutantes wearing cloche hats and fur stoles up flight after flight of stairs to the roof of the unfinished 42-story building.
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NEIGHBORHOOD REPORT: FRESH MEADOWS; Finally, Some Respect For a Pioneer Parkway
NYTimes - almost 15 years
Had you been out for a stroll through Cunningham Park or Alley Pond Park on certain days during the last 33 years, you would have seen people bicycling and jogging on a worn concrete path. You would also have seen Robert Miller on his knees, measuring the dimensions of the concrete. Mr. Miller, 57, was trying to figure out the width and location of
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Cropsey's Seasonal Vistas a Steady Weave of Grace and Harmony
NYTimes - over 15 years
Jasper Francis Cropsey's ''Mounts Adam and Eve'' paintings, done near his house in Warwick, N.Y., show domesticated nature, mid-19th-century American style, our view peaceably orchestrated from haystacks to stone wall to mountains. They are modest mountains, by the way, not awesome peaks; a Sunday hiker's hills, if you're a Sunday hiker who does
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Cashing In on a New Era of Opulence; School Seeks Home Buyers Who Want to Live Like Vanderbilts
NYTimes - over 16 years
The Lycee Francais de New York, the prestigious school that attracts Europeans and American Francophiles, is selling all six of its buildings on the Upper East Side. The school expects to sell the buildings to wealthy people who want to restore them to single-family homes. And the school hopes to make big profit, more than $100 million, on the
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More Golf Courses? Some Say Enough Already
NYTimes - over 17 years
IS golf becoming the sport that swallowed Long Island? Its popularity has exploded in the 1990's, with an estimated 200,000 to 250,000 local players. They keep the fairways of nearly 150 courses busy from dawn to dusk. At private clubs, members pay up to $200,000 to join. At public courses, frustrated duffers complain that the sport's toughest
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LONG ISLAND JOURNAL; When Breast Cancer Invigorates a New Life
NYTimes - over 18 years
LORETTA COLON took three cruises this year. She frequented Broadway shows. With two sons out of college, she and her husband savored every moment. Mrs. Colon learned the hard way how to enjoy life. After a routine mammogram six years ago, Mrs. Colon, now 51, learned she had breast cancer. She underwent a mastectomy and reconstructive surgery.
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The Happy Medium
NYTimes - almost 19 years
Other Powers The Age of Suffrage, Spiritualism, and the Scandalous Victoria Woodhull. By Barbara Goldsmith. Illustrated. 531 pp. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. $30. Notorious Victoria The Life of Victoria Woodhull, Uncensored. By Mary Gabriel. Illustrated. 372 pp. Chapel Hill, N.C.: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill. $24.95. Somewhere in our long-lost
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L.I.R.R. Moving to Drop 32 More Ticket Windows
NYTimes - about 21 years
THE ticket windows at 32 Long Island Rail Road stations will close this year, leaving more of the railroad's 256,000 daily passengers to transact business solely with ticket vending machines. The plan, which begins taking effect on April 1, eliminates ticket sellers at low-volume stations and is expected to reduce the L.I.R.R.'s approved $654.2
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ARTS/ARTIFACTS; Relics From the Gaslight Era With a Silver-Screen Luster
NYTimes - over 21 years
BY 1942, THE ROBBER-BARON style of furnishings was out of fashion in American decorating. At an auction that year, chairs, tables and cabinets from the Mark Hopkins summer mansion near San Francisco -- some of the best and most decorative pieces by Herter Brothers of New York, the pre-eminent cabinetmakers of the period -- took in a mere total of
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of William Kissam Vanderbilt
    LATE_ADULTHOOD
  • 1920
    Age 70
    Vanderbilt died in Paris, France on July 22, 1920.
    More Details Hide Details His remains were brought home and interred in the Vanderbilt family vault in the Moravian Cemetery in New Dorp, Staten Island, New York.
  • 1911
    Age 61
    Vanderbilt's portrait, painted by F. W. Wright from an original painting by Richard Hall between 1911 and 1921, was donated to Vanderbilt University in 1921; it is hung in Kirkland Hall.
    More Details Hide Details Founding member of the Jekyll Island Club on Jekyll Island, Georgia.
    In 1911 he leased it (and eventually sold it to) the Shubert Organization who then transformed it into the Winter Garden Theatre.
    More Details Hide Details After his divorce from Alva, he moved to France where he built a château and established the Haras du Quesnay horse racing stable and breeding farm near Deauville in France's famous horse region of Lower Normandy. Among the horses he owned was the U.S. Racing Hall of Fame filly Maskette, purchased from Castleton Farm in Lexington, Kentucky for broodmare services at his French breeding farm. Vanderbilt's horses won a number of important races in France including:
  • FIFTIES
  • 1903
    Age 53
    In 1903, Vanderbilt married Anne Harriman, daughter of banker Oliver Harriman.
    More Details Hide Details She was a widow to sportsman Samuel Stevens Sands and to Lewis Morris Rutherfurd, Jr., son of the astronomer Lewis Morris Rutherfurd. Her second husband died in Switzerland in 1901. She had two sons by her first marriage and two daughters by her second marriage. She had no children by Vanderbilt. Like other Vanderbilts, he built magnificent houses. His residences included Idle Hour (1900) on Long Island and Marble House (1892), designed by Richard Morris Hunt, in Newport, Rhode Island. Hunt also designed Vanderbilt's 660 Fifth Avenue mansion (1883).
  • FORTIES
  • 1895
    Age 45
    Vanderbilt was a co-owner of the yacht Defender, which won the 1895 America's Cup and briefly owned the large steam yacht Consuelo.
    More Details Hide Details Vanderbilt was a founder and president of the New Theatre. He was also a member of the Jekyll Island Club aka The Millionaires Club. Vanderbilt made significant charitable contributions to Vanderbilt University, a private university in Nashville, Tennessee named for his grandfather.
    Alva divorced Vanderbilt in March 1895, at a time when divorce was rare among the elite, and received a large financial settlement reported to be in excess of $10 million (equal to about $ million today). The grounds for divorce were allegations of Vanderbilt's adultery. Alva remarried to one of their old family friends, Oliver Hazard Perry Belmont, on January 11, 1896.
    More Details Hide Details
  • TWENTIES
  • 1877
    Age 27
    Consuelo Vanderbilt was born on March 2, 1877, followed by William Kissam Vanderbilt II on March 2, 1878, and Harold Stirling Vanderbilt on July 6, 1884.
    More Details Hide Details Alva later coerced Consuelo into marrying Charles Spencer-Churchill, 9th Duke of Marlborough on November 6, 1895.
  • 1875
    Age 25
    Vanderbilt's first wife was Alva Erskine Smith (1853–1933), whom he married on April 20, 1875.
    More Details Hide Details She was born in 1853, in Mobile, Alabama, to Murray Forbes Smith, a commission merchant, and Phoebe Ann Desha, daughter of US Representative Robert Desha. They had three children.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1849
    Born
    William Kissam Vanderbilt I was born on December 12, 1849.
    More Details Hide Details His father was William Henry Vanderbilt. His paternal grandfather was Cornelius Vanderbilt. Vanderbilt inherited $55 million (equal to about $ billion today). from his father. He managed his family railroad investments. In 1879, after taking over P. T. Barnum's Great Roman Hippodrome which was on railroad property by Madison Square Park, he renamed the facility Madison Square Garden. Vanderbilt was one of the founders of The Jockey Club. He was a shareholder and president of the Sheepshead Bay Race Track in Brooklyn, New York and the owner of a successful racing stable. In 1896, he built the American Horse Exchange at 50th Street (Manhattan) and Broadway.
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