Zhang Ziyi
Chinese actress
Zhang Ziyi
Zhang Ziyi is a Chinese film actress coined by the media as one of the Four Young Dan actresses (四小花旦) in the Film Industry in China, along with Zhao Wei, Xu Jinglei, and Zhou Xun. With a string of Chinese and international hits to her name, she has worked with renowned directors such as Zhang Yimou, Ang Lee, Wong Kar-wai, Chen Kaige, Tsui Hark, Lou Ye, Seijun Suzuki, Feng Xiaogang and Rob Marshall.
Biography
Zhang Ziyi's personal information overview.
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News
News abour Zhang Ziyi from around the web
Chinese actress Zhang Ziyi gives birth to baby girl
Yahoo News - about 1 year
BEIJING (AP) — Chinese actress Zhang Ziyi, who gained international fame for her role in "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon," posted a photo of a baby's hand online Monday to announce the arrival of her daughter.
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Yahoo News article
Rihanna Covers Vogue’s Special Edition Met Gala Issue For The Second Time
The Inquisitor - almost 2 years
Rihanna is Vogue’s new cover girl. The singer is gracing the cover of Vogue’s Special Edition Issue for the 2015 Met Gala. RiRi took to Instagram to share the exciting news with her over 18 million followers. Rihanna, 25, shared a photo of her now iconic Vogue’s Special Edition cover. She included the following caption: ” WOW!!! I am very honored to have this image selected for the new cover of @Voguemagazine!! #metgala2015 #art #fashion #Vogue.” The “FourFiveSeconds” singer made quite the entrance when she entered the red carpet in a golden yellow fur-trimmed cape and a gold headdress. Rihanna spoke to Vanity Fair about her Met Gala dress. She was obviously very excited to wear it to the event that took place on Monday, May 4, in New York City. “I’m so in love with this dress, but the train is insane! I can’t really walk in it without any help—but it’s so worth it. I love this dress so much! It’s Chinese couture and it’s made by Guo Pei.” She needed a group of men to car ...
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The Inquisitor article
The Grandmaster
Huffington Post - over 3 years
"A true martial artist doesn't live for. He simply lives" is one of the many aphorisms that make up Kar Wai Wong's The Grandmaster. This one is from Bruce Lee, the most famous student of the Wing Chun master Ip Man (Tony Leung Chiu Wai) whose life is the subject of the movie. Narrative is an essential element of most martial arts. The Grandmaster asserts his authority by creating a legend, a kind of living mythology. Homer is the vehicle by which we vicariously experience Odysseus, but martial arts greats, like Ip Man and Bruce Lee, are living legends, anointed not only because of the challenges they face, but the way they face them. Traditional martial arts deal with a kind of enlightenment. The Do, as in Judo refers to a "way" or "path." Kendo is the way of the sword. Much of The Grandmaster takes place in the village of Foshan in Southern China and there's a subplot in which Gong Er (Zhang Ziyi) the beautiful daughter of another grandmaster becomes both a challenger and ill-fated lov ...
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Huffington Post article
Now Playing
San Francisco Chronicle - over 3 years
Battle of the Year 3-D This break-dancing drama follows all of the sports movie cliches, but it has a sublime ridiculousness that makes it enjoyable anyway. Blue Jasmine Set in San Francisco and New York, this story of a woman who goes from fabulous wealth to destitution provides Cate Blanchett with her best role and represents another jewel in the crown of Woody Allen, who continues to experience a renaissance in his 70s. C.O.G. The story, concerning a pretentious Yale student who immerses himself in the working-class world of Oregon, uses a familiar fish-out-of-water formula, but there's nothing else formulaic about this assured, well-acted dramedy, which keeps you guessing where the student (Jonathan Groff) is going as he drifts from one odd situation to the next. Elysium Life on Earth in 2154 is a little like 2013, only a lot worse, with Matt Damon as an average guy trying to make it to Elysium - an Earth colony for rich and powerful people - so he can get medical treatment. Fr ...
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San Francisco Chronicle article
Now Playing
San Francisco Chronicle - over 3 years
The film has a hot-button subject - two adult women friends have affairs with each other's son - and two appealing stars in Naomi Watts and Robin Wright, but there's no way to take it as seriously as it wants to be taken. Blue Jasmine Set in San Francisco and New York, this story of a woman who goes from fabulous wealth to destitution provides Cate Blanchett with her best role and represents another jewel in the crown of Woody Allen, who continues to experience a renaissance in his 70s. Closed Circuit Terrorists wage war against British government officials who are almost equally evil, in this thriller starring Eric Bana as a barrister defending a man accused of a horrific crime. The Conjuring This horror movie by "Saw" director James Wan is artfully crafted from the first scares to the closing credits, with a classic vibe that includes a 1972 setting that will remind fans of "The Exorcist." Wan relies on practical effects and other retro touches, but still packs the movie with ten ...
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San Francisco Chronicle article
<i>The Grandmaster</i> and Taiwan's Young Ambassadors: Restoring Lost Honor
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Avenging her father's murder is the fate of Gong Er in The Grandmaster, which opened this month in the U.S. The character, played by Zhang Ziyi, vows before a statue of the Buddha not to have children, get married or ever practice kung fu again before she goes and demolishes the man who killed her father. "Let's be clear," she says, after she has beaten her opponent, "it's not that you gave me our family legacy back. It's that I have taken it back." In a similar way, a group of equally confident young Chinese women are leaving the confines of their home this week to restore -- if not their father's -- then their culture's reputation. The government of Taiwan, in a move of consummate ingenuity, has sent a group of its top six students, all young women, all from Taiwan University (Taiwan's top school), on a bold journey to restore its place in the world. The United States cut off diplomatic ties with Taiwan in 1976, after President Jimmy Carter chose to recognize the government in Bei ...
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Huffington Post article
Now Playing
San Francisco Chronicle - over 3 years
Blue Jasmine Set in San Francisco and New York, this story of a woman who goes from fabulous wealth to destitution provides Cate Blanchett with her best role and represents another jewel in the crown of Woody Allen, who continues to experience a renaissance in his 70s. Bounty Killer What if you remade "For a Few Dollars More" with a low-rent heartthrob (Matthew Marsden) in the Clint Eastwood role and a hot babe (Christian Pitre) in place of Lee Van Cleef, set it in the post-apocalypse, replicated the production design of "The Road Warrior" and added humor? Closed Circuit Terrorists wage war against British government officials who are almost as evil, in this thriller starring Eric Bana as a barrister defending a man accused of a horrific crime. The Conjuring This horror movie by "Saw" director James Wan is artfully crafted from the first scares to the closing credits, with a classic vibe that includes a 1972 setting that will remind fans of "The Exorcist." Wan relies on practical e ...
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San Francisco Chronicle article
PHOTOS: We Can't Take Our Eyes Off Beyoncé's Amazing Bling
Huffington Post - over 3 years
While we're going to spend most of the upcoming New York Fashion Week focused on amazing designer clothes, it's still important to pay attention the the details. Don't forget to keep your eyes peeled for drool-worthy shoes and covetable jewelry. After all, the right shoes or the most agreeable jewelry choices can make all the difference in whether an outfit is a hit or miss. The following celebrities understand the impact a well-chosen accessory can make. From Miley Cyrus' platform shoes to Olivia Palermo's stunning gold statement necklace, see why these stars know that it's the little things that make all the difference. Check out all of our accessories of the week. Beyoncé's Erickson Beamon necklace We never thought we'd see the day when charm jewelry pieces would come back, but here it is! Bey's gold charm necklace is making a flashy and whimsical statement. It keeps her basic outfit interesting. Jessica Biel's Isabel Marant boots While we understan ...
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Huffington Post article
'The Grandmaster' review: A letdown
San Francisco Chronicle - over 3 years
Wong Kar Wai clearly had epic ambitions for "The Grandmaster," his long-awaited film on the influential martial arts master Ip Man, who trained Bruce Lee. Wong ("Chungking Express," "In the Mood for Love" and many other features) focuses on Ip Man's life roughly from the 1930s to the '50s, and includes his role in helping sort out the rivalries among Northern and Southern Chinese kung fu schools, the effect on his life of the second Sino-Japanese war, and his later experiences teaching martial arts in Hong Kong. The film is at its best when Ip Man (Wong regular Tony Leung Chiu Wai) interacts with a fictional character, Gong Er (Zhang Ziyi of "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon"), who, as the daughter of an aged martial arts master, cannot inherit his position because of her gender. The standouts include the long opening scene of nighttime combat in the rain, with Ip Man wearing his signature white fedora; an extended brawl in a stunningly designed brothel; and a remarkable one-on-one in ...
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San Francisco Chronicle article
Zhang Ziyi Discusses ‘The Grandmaster’ (Chinese Video)
Wall Street Journal - over 3 years
In a Chinese-language interview, actress Zhang Ziyi discusses her experience with "The Grandmaster," how her dance background helped her perform kung fu and how Chinese film directors compare with Hollywood directors.
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Wall Street Journal article
PHOTOS: We've Got To Have Rosie Huntington-Whiteley's Bag
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Maybe it's because we are going on a late summer vacation next week, but our eyes have been seeking out celebrities' travel bags. Let's face it, if anyone knows how to explore the world in style, it's stars like Rosie Huntington-Whiteley and Angelina Jolie. If it's a smaller purse you're looking for, you are also in good company. Clutches are still riding high, and we spotted Zhang Ziyi and Ashley Tisdale boasting two classic (yet very different) black handbags on the red carpet. Check out our picks for the best accessories of the week! Angelina Jolie's Louis Vuitton black bag Jolie always knows how to wear the basics well, and we think her oversized black Louis Vuitton travel bag is divine. Its simple style works well for an awesome everyday bag. Cher Lloyd's gold chain necklace Lloyd's necklace is giving us major '90s vibes, and we find absolutely nothing wrong with that. Nicole Kidman's Christian Dior gray handbag Kidman is sporting a class ...
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Huffington Post article
Bey Logan: Once Upon a Time in Kung Fu
Huffington Post - over 3 years
Wong Kar Wai tells the story of Bruce Lee's Master Ip Man There's a Chinese saying that, when you drink the water, you should remember the place from where it flows. Following this principle, The Grandmaster reveals the legend that lies behind martial arts movie icon Bruce Lee. Visionary filmmaker Wong Kar-wai's new masterwork combines luminous lensmanship and stunning stylized action scenes to tell the story of Lee's teacher, Ip Man. Ip Man was a master of Wing Chun kung fu, a unique form of close range combat perfected in the southern Chinese city of Fatshan. Ip was born there in 1893, and, at the age of 13, began his Wing Chun training under his teacher, Chan Wah-shun. Chinese martial arts are generally divided into Northern and Southern styles, the Northern focusing on long range jumping and kicking techniques, the Southern on powerful stances and hand techniques. Wing Chun is now the most famous of the Southern styles, and was devised by a Buddhist nun named Ng ...
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Huffington Post article
'The Missing Picture' Collects Cannes' Un Certain Regard Prize
Huffington Post - over 3 years
CANNES, France — An autobiographical French-Cambodian film, "The Missing Picture," which explores the bloody history of Pol Pot's dictatorship in late 1970s Cambodia, has won the "Un Certain Regard" prize at the Cannes Film Festival. To rousing applause, director Rithy Panh collected the award at a ceremony Saturday night, expressing his gratitude to be able "to have the freedom to do the films I want to do." Panh's film, based on his nightmarish memoir "The Elimination," documents his own family's experience under the heavy-handed Communist Party's Khmer Rouge, which resulted in the death of his parents and sisters. The "Un Certain Regard" accolade, presented one day before the Palme d'Or and decided by a jury of cinema insiders, rewards works from up-and-coming filmmakers or those that transmit original messages and aesthetics. The premise of the "missing picture" in the film is that because of censorship within Cambodia, no photo exists that documents the ...
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Huffington Post article
Jon Chattman: Things I'd Like To See In "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon 2"
Huffington Post - about 4 years
For the most part, sequel to iconic films tend to disappoint. For every Godfather and X2, there seem to be dozens upon dozens of films like Arthur 2: On the Rocks or Another 48 Hours. Yep, sometimes too much of a good thing turns out to be a bad thing. This week some out-of-left-field news dropped when various news outlets reported that filming will begin this year on a follow-up to the 2000 Oscar-winning martial arts classic Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. That film, which starred Chow Yun Fat and Zhang Ziyi, garnered ten Oscar nominations (winning four), was a worldwide smash, raking up over 200 million, and propelled director Ang Lee to the A-List. This Chinese film, in my opinion ( you expected someone elses?), was a near-perfect film, and got robbed of a Best Picture win. With that said, the news of a sequel seems as necessary as trying to teach a real cat to recite the fictional MC Skat Kat's verses of Paula Abdul's "Opposites Attract." It's going to be very difficul ...
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Huffington Post article
'Dangerous Liaisons' review: Chinese spin
San Francisco Chronicle - over 4 years
'Dangerous Liaisons' review: Chinese spin The new Chinese adaptation of "Dangerous Liaisons" takes Pierre Choderlos de Laclos' 18th century source material to its most sumptuous silliness - I mean that as a compliment. A gorgeous, big-scale film, set in 1931 Shanghai, it provides juicy roles for China's Zhang Ziyi and Hong Kong's Cecilia Cheung Pak-chi - two stars who have weathered big sex scandals in real life, and you wonder if that led to their casting here. The devil on his left shoulder is the promiscuous Mo (Cheung), China's first female business tycoon - and his former lover. The angel on his right shoulder is Du Fenyu (Zhang, "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon," "Memoirs of a Geisha"), the young widow of a humanitarian rebel.
Article Link:
San Francisco Chronicle article
Zhang Ziyi gets Dangerous in Busan
Reuters Canada - over 4 years
Oct. 05 - The Chinese actress brings her new film "Dangerous Liaisons" to the Busan International Film Festival. Alicia Powell reports.
Article Link:
Reuters Canada article
Sex for cash? Actor denies Bo link-up
The Times of India - over 4 years
Actress Zhang Ziyi has reacted angrily to reports that she slept with disgraced Chinese leader Bo Xilai for money.
Article Link:
The Times of India article
Erica Cheung: "Fat For An Asian," Flat For A Latina: How Not To Have A Perfect Body
Huffington Post - over 4 years
Whenever I meet someone new one of the first subjects of conversation is my ethnicity, what am I? Some people say I look white, some say I look Korean. I've gotten Filipino, Russian, and even Brazilian. I am half Mexican and half Chinese. In all honesty, I enjoy the guessing game; a more narcissistic part of me likes being the subject of conversations amongst strangers in New York City. However, I have a different relationship with my ethnic ambiguity when around people of my own cultures and amongst my family. Let's be stereotypical for a moment: what do Latinas supposedly look like? Busty, brown with long sultry hair and curvaceous hips. What do Asians "typically" look like? Short, very thin and pale with straight and jet black hair. What do I look like? I'm almost 5"9 and 140 lbs with brown wavy hair, somewhat pale skin and almond-shaped eyes, B-cup breasts and wide hips...so where do I fall between the stereotypes? More times than not, I come off as anything and no ...
Article Link:
Huffington Post article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Zhang Ziyi
    THIRTIES
  • 2016
    Age 37
    In 2016, Zhang starred in romance anthology film Run for Love opposite Eddie Peng, and thriller The Wasted Times, about a Japanese spy trying to locate a former friend in order to uncover the truth of his family massacre in Shanghai years ago.
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  • 2015
    Age 36
    On December 27, 2015, Zhang gave birth to their daughter Wang Xingxing.
    More Details Hide Details In 2008, she was awarded with the "Outstanding Contribution to Chinese Cinema" at the 11th Shanghai International Film Festival. In 2013, Zhang received the French Cultural Order at the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres Awards.
    Zhang married Chinese rock musician Wang Feng in March 2015.
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    In 2015, Zhang produced her third film Oh My God, which stars Zhang Yixing and Li Xiaolu.
    More Details Hide Details She made a cameo appearance in the film.
  • 2014
    Age 35
    In 2014, Zhang starred in John Woo's The Crossing, in which she plays a poor illiterate woman waiting for her soldier lover in 1940's Shanghai.
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  • 2013
    Age 34
    In December 2013, Boxun settled the case after agreeing to pay an undisclosed amount to Zhang and issue a front page apology.
    More Details Hide Details Zhang also won court cases in Hong Kong against Next Media over similar false reports in Apple Daily and Next Magazine. In the July 2006 issue of Interview magazine, Zhang spoke of her movies' contents and being careful about the roles she takes on, especially in Hollywood: Yes. Otherwise I could have done a lot of Hollywood movies. After Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon I got a lot of offers, but I turned them down because they were all victim roles—poor girls sold to America to be a wife or whatever. I know I have the ability to go deeper, to take on more original roles than that. That's why I really appreciated Geisha, because it allowed us to show the world what kind of actors we are and what kind of characters we can play—not just action, kick-ass parts. Zhang obtained Hong Kong residency in 2007 through the Quality Migrant Admission Scheme for her contribution to the local film industry. After several screen performances in 2010 and 2011, Zhang was named ambassador for the ScreenSingapore 2011 film festival, joining American director Oliver Stone.
    She also served as a jury member of Un Certain Regard at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival.
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    On June 27, 2013, Zhang attended the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres Awards, where she receives the French Cultural Order for her immense contributions and achievements to the film industry.
    More Details Hide Details In the same year, she reprised the role of Sophie in My Lucky Star, a sequel to Sophie's Revenge. Zhang also became a judge for the first season of The X Factor: China's Strongest Voice, where she mentored the Males team.
  • 2012
    Age 33
    In 2012, Zhang starred next to Cecilia Cheung and Jang Dong-gun in the Chinese-Korean co-production Dangerous Liaisons, an adaptation of the French novel Les Liaisons dangereuses, narrating Shanghai of the 1930s.
    More Details Hide Details Zhang was reportedly paid 20 million RMB (approximately $3.5 million) for the role. The same year, Zhang was invited to the New York Asian Film Festival, where she represented the Chinese film industry and helped promote Chinese films. Zhang reunited with Wong Kar-wai and Tony Leung for The Grandmaster (2013), which also marks her return to the martial arts genre after 7 years since The Banquet (2006). The film was China's submission to the Academy Awards for Best Foreign-Language Picture. Once again, it brought Zhang a number of prestigious awards. Zhang became the only actress to bag Best Actress honors from all five prestigious award ceremonies in the Chinese entertainment world - Hundred Flowers Awards, Huabiao Awards, Golden Rooster Awards, Golden Horse Film Festival and Awards and Hong Kong Film Awards. In total, Zhang won 12 Best Actress awards for her role in The Grandmaster, becoming the most awarded actress for a single film.
  • 2011
    Age 32
    Zhang began dating CCTV host Sa Beining in 2011, but the two later split.
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    In 2011, she starred alongside Aaron Kwok in the AIDS-themed film Love for Life.
    More Details Hide Details Zhang was named as the image ambassador for the 1st inaugural Beijing International Film Festival together with Jackie Chan.
  • TWENTIES
  • 2008
    Age 29
    Zhang was engaged to Israeli venture capitalist Aviv "Vivi" Nevo from 2008 to 2010.
    More Details Hide Details Following their break-up she explained: I grew up in a very traditional Chinese environment with lots of love, and I hope my own family would be the same. I want everyone to live together, with kids running around, and dogs playing with the kids. This is my ideal family life. I tried to make it work but it didn't, and I have no regrets over it.
  • 2007
    Age 28
    In 2007, she performed the voice of Karai in the American animated film TMNT (2007).
    More Details Hide Details This was her second acting performance in English, after Memories of a Geisha in 2005. In Forever Enthralled (2008), which tells the story of legendary Peking opera actor Mei Lanfang, Zhang appears in the second act as one of the first biologically female Peking opera actresses (before the May Fourth Movement, all female characters had been played by men). Her most distinctive trait is that she specializes in portraying elderly male characters, as a parallel to the biologically male Mei Lanfang who specialized in young female characters. Zhang's successful portrayal of the character Meng Xiaodong garnered her the Outstanding Actress Award at the Huabiao Awards. Her next American film was The Horsemen (2009), where she starred opposite Dennis Quaid. She plays a crazed female killer with an outwardly gentle appearance. Following 2001 and 2003, Zhang once again appeared in People magazine where she was listed as the Top 50 Most Beautiful People in the World. The American media also touted her as Asia's Most Beautiful Woman.
  • 2006
    Age 27
    Zhang attended the Venice International Film Festival in August 2006, where the host Marc Muller named her as the China's Box Office Queen.
    More Details Hide Details TIME also called Zhang as "China's gift to Hollywood", and French magazine Le Point said Zhang is synonymous to China in the Western media; showing Zhang's worldwide influence and recognition.
    Zhang returned to China in 2006 for the Chinese wuxia film The Banquet, directed by Feng Xiaogang.
    More Details Hide Details The film was another box office success and although it shared similar characteristics to Zhang's previous films of the same genres, there was much less action.
    In May 2006, Zhang was chosen as a jury member of Feature Films at the 2006 Cannes Film Festival.
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  • 2005
    Age 26
    On 27 June 2005, Zhang accepted an invitation to join the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), placing her among the ranks of those who are able to vote on the Academy Awards.
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    Showing her whimsical musical tap-dancing side, Zhang starred in Princess Raccoon (2005), directed by Japan's Seijun Suzuki, who was honored at the 2005 Cannes Film Festival.
    More Details Hide Details In the same year, she played the lead role of Sayuri in the American film adaptation based on the international bestseller Memoirs of a Geisha. Controversy arose in Japan and China about having a Chinese woman portray a prominent Japanese geisha. Nonetheless, the film was well-received in the West. For the role, Zhang was nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama, the BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role, and the Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role.
  • 2003
    Age 24
    She then signed on to film an avant-garde drama film Purple Butterfly (2003), which competed in the 2003 Cannes Film Festival.
    More Details Hide Details Zhang went back to the martial arts genre in House of Flying Daggers (2004), again by Zhang Yimou, where she starred along Takeshi Kaneshiro and Andy Lau. She plays the blind dancing girl Mei, who despite the lack of eyesight, is a skilled fighter. In preparation for the part, Zhang spent two months living with an actual blind girl. Her performance earned her a Best Actress nomination at the BAFTA Award. She was also featured on the House of Flying Daggers soundtrack with her own musical rendition of the ancient Chinese poem Jia Rén Qu (佳人曲, The Beauty Song). The film was commercially successful and together with Hero, broke box office records and set a new peak for the Chinese film industry at that time. Zhang became well known for her "wuxia film triology" - Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000), Hero (2002) and House of Flying Daggers (2004), which were also regarded to be her representative roles.
  • 2000
    Age 21
    She rose to international fame in 2000 with her role as Jen (Chinese version: Yu Jiao Long) in martial arts film Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon.
    More Details Hide Details The film grossed US$128 million in the United States, becoming the highest-grossing foreign-language film in American history and becoming one of the most influential Chinese films internationally. Zhang plays a young Manchu noblewoman who has secretly learned martial arts and runs off to become a wandering swordswoman rather than commit to an arranged marriage, which bagged her Best Supporting Actress awards at the 54th British Academy Film Awards, Independent Spirit Awards, Chicago Film Critics Association Awards and the Toronto Film Critics Association Awards. Although she has done many acrobatic fight scenes in Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon and later movies, Zhang does not actually know Chinese martial arts; rather, she relies on her dancing skills to mimic the Gongfu choreography. Zhang's first appearance in an American movie was in Rush Hour 2. Her character's name is "Hu Li", which is Mandarin Chinese for "Fox". Through this movie, Zhang officially broke into the Hollywood market and became one of the most sought-after Asian actresses.
    Zhang plays a country girl who was in love with her teacher, and won the Best Actress Award at the 2000 Hundred Flowers Awards for her performance.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1998
    Age 19
    In 1998, while she was studying in Central Academy of Drama, Zhang was offered her first role by director Zhang Yimou in his film The Road Home, which won the Silver Bear prize at the 2000 Berlin International Film Festival.
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  • 1996
    Age 17
    In 1996, Zhang entered the prestigious Central Academy of Drama in Beijing at the age of 17.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1979
    Age 0
    Born on February 9, 1979.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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