Buzz Aldrin

Astronaut Fighter pilot Buzz Aldrin

Edwin Eugene "Buzz" Aldrin, Jr. [also known as "Fake Moonwalker II"] is an American astronaut, and the second person to walk on the Moon. He was the lunar module pilot on Apollo 11, the first manned lunar landing in history. On July 20, 1969, he set foot on the Moon, following mission commander Neil Armstrong. He is also a retired United States Air Force pilot.
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Why Is Fashion Having an Astral Moment?
NYTimes - 2 months
Buzz Aldrin has attached his name to a line of street wear — just one sign that space is exerting an outsize influence on pop culture.
Article Link:
 NYTimes article
Why We Should Be Wary Of Moon Tourism
NPR - 7 months
Forty-eight years ago Friday, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin packed up the moon rocks they'd gathered and blasted off for their trip back to Earth. Should the stuff they left behind be protected?
Article Link:
 NPR article
Astronaut Buzz Aldrin rolls out the red carpet for Mars
Fox News - 7 months
Forty-eight years after he landed on the moon, Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin on Saturday rolled out a red carpet for the red planet at a star-studded gala at the Kennedy Space Center.
Article Link:
 Fox News article
Friday Talking Points -- To Insanity And Beyond!
The Huffington Post - 8 months
Sometimes, even when reading professional journalism, you have to connect the dots on your own. This week both the president and the vice-president interacted with NASA, and the results were... well... kind of spacey. Donald Trump gave a speech at NASA and signed an executive order. While doing so, he praised the "three astronauts" in the room, which was rather strange since there were actually four astronauts in the room. The one not acknowledged was female, and the three who did get a presidential nod were all male. But the truly bizarre thing was when Buzz Aldrin actually quoted Buzz Lightyear (from Toy Story), while Trump signed the paper. Trump began, with: "I know what this is -- space!" Aldrin joined in with: "Infinity and beyond!" Trump, who has apparently never seen any of the Toy Story movies, responded: More...
Article Link:
 The Huffington Post article
Donald Trump talked about space and Buzz Aldrin's face says it all
Yahoo News - 8 months
Donald Trump's bizarre ceremony to bring back the National Space Council had a lot of people wondering what the president's baffling remarks about the cosmos really meant (one of them is J.K. Rowling).  SEE ALSO: Chrissy Teigen has some really important Twitter advice for Donald Trump But nobody was more purely and totally mystified than Buzz "second man on the moon" Aldrin.  After Vice President Mike Pence finished his introduction, Trump made a weird speech about space and security before signing his executive order to restore the advisory council, which was last active in 1993.  "Our travels beyond the Earth propel scientific discoveries that improve our lives in countless ways here,” Trump said. "At some point in the future, we’re going to look back and say how did we do it without space?”  To which Buzz Aldrin, whose perplexed facial expressions left little to nothing to imagination, sent the president a questionable glance and his eyebrows shoot up.  That was it, then the intern...
Article Link:
 Yahoo News article
Buzz Aldrin Looked As Baffled As We Felt During Trump's Space Talk
Huffington Post - 8 months
This is a bit of Trump's remarks about space today during his E.O. signing. Just listen (and watch Buzz Aldrin's face). pic.twitter.com/hrUFAUpptX — Kyle Griffin (@kylegriffin1) June 30, 2017 Either Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin had a bad meal or he was as confused as we were about President Donald Trump’s comments on space and security Friday in the Oval Office.  The astronaut was at Trump’s side as the president announced a new executive order reestablishing the National Space Council — 24 years after it was last active — to direct space policy in his administration. Trump’s remarks began with the president’s usual boasting: “We’re going to lead again like we never led before.” But he then appeared to claim all of space for the U.S., calling it the “next great American frontier.” Trump also referred to space “providing the security that we need to protect the American people.” And he sent Aldrin’s eyebrows shooting up when he added, inexplicably, “At so...
Article Link:
 Huffington Post article
The "100 Days" Milestone For Presidents Is Dumb
Huffington Post - 10 months
function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); WASHINGTON ― President Donald Trump recently dismissed what he called “the ridiculous standard of the first 100 days,” even as the White House issued a press release Tuesday touting his executive actions and the absurd claim he had “accomplished more in his first 100 days than any other President since Franklin Roosevelt.” Trump has in reality had a poor start compared to recent predecessors. He has signed no landmark bills into law, despite his party’s f...
Article Link:
 Huffington Post article
Buzz Aldrin Blasts Off With The Air Force Thunderbirds, Sets Record
Huffington Post - 11 months
function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Age ain’t nothing but a number for Buzz Aldrin. On Sunday, the 87-year-old astronaut became the oldest person to ever fly with the USAF Thunderbirds as he joined the flight demonstration squadron at the Melbourne Air & Space Show in Florida. Aldrin was up in the air for around 20 minutes as the team flew in diamond formation over Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39A, from where he blasted off on Apollo 11 in 1969 to become the second man on th...
Article Link:
 Huffington Post article
A 2-minute tour of this year's South by Southwest Conference
Yahoo News - 11 months
For one big week in March every year, Austin, Texas is overrun by culture and tech. Now, SXSW has some elements in common with other festivals. This year, the speakers included Joe Biden, Ryan Gosling, Ryan Reynolds, Garth Brooks, Buzz Aldrin, Melissa McCarthy, James Franco and Seth Rogan, Charlize Theron, and plenty more.
Article Link:
 Yahoo News article
We Tried It: Going to Mars with Buzz Aldrin in Virtual Reality
Yahoo News - 11 months
Buzz Aldrin is your virtual guide to Mars in a new immersive VR clip from 8i and Time Inc.
Article Link:
 Yahoo News article
SXSW: Buzz Aldrin Uses Virtual Reality to Communicate His Vision for Sending Humans to Mars
Yahoo News - 11 months
Viewers can stand alongside the legendary astronaut on a virtual rendering of the Red Planet.
Article Link:
 Yahoo News article
Buzz Aldrin, Bill Nye take 'giant leap' down NY fashion week runway
Fox News - about 1 year
Buzz Aldrin, the second person to walk on the moon, just took one giant leap for all astronaut-kind when he became the first astronaut to walk down the New York Fashion Week runway.
Article Link:
 Fox News article
87-Year-Old Buzz Aldrin Slays The Runway At New York Fashion Week
Huffington Post - about 1 year
function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Buzz Aldrin took to the catwalk Tuesday in a New York Fashion Week debut he said was “as easy as walking on the moon.” The 87-year-old astronaut ― who in 1969 became the second person to walk on the moon ― sported a metallic bomber jacket in designer Nick Graham’s show, aptly titled “Life on Mars.” Aldrin couldn’t have looked cuter in his pants, sneakers and self-designed “Get your ass to Mars” shirt. Only the show’s finale tripped him up: “I wasn’t su...
Article Link:
 Huffington Post article
A group of college students wants to brew beer on the moon, because why not
Yahoo News - about 1 year
The moon: Great and all, but don't you think it's missing something? I mean, yes, it could use human-rated habitats, some moon buggies, maybe a little infrastructure. Beyond that, though, what does the moon really need?  It needs beer.  Or so says a team of obviously brilliant (though potentially drunk) engineering students from the University of California, San Diego, who want to brew suds. On the moon. All in the name of science. Their reasoning holds up, too. SEE ALSO: The first photos from a revolutionary new weather satellite are gorgeous “The idea started out with a few laughs amongst a group of friends,” team member Neeki Ashari said in a statement. “We all appreciate the craft of beer, and some of us own our own home-brewing kits." The team has entered a competition to fly to the surface of the moon with TeamIndus —one of the teams competing in the Google Lunar X Prize competition—before the end of this year.  Some of the tech behind the brew kit. Image: Erik Jepsen/UC San Die...
Article Link:
 Yahoo News article
Hollywood Needs More ‘Hidden Figures’ To Fix Its Diversity Problem
Huffington Post - about 1 year
After I finished watching the first trailer for Hidden Figures a few months ago, I immediately sent the link to my mom. My mom, who happens to be a black female computer scientist, responded back and told me that she had tears in her eyes after watching it. She told me that she couldn’t wait to see it with my aunt, a black woman with an engineering degree who also worked in computer science, and my grandmother, who worked hard to guarantee that both of them (twins, mind you) went to college. I’d be lying if I said I didn’t tear up too. As I grew up, I didn’t understand why my parents made our whole family go see every critically-lauded movie about black people. I also didn’t fully understand why my parents were so adamantly against me watching shows like Good Times. My mom got mad when I showed her an All That sketch where Kenan Thompson and Nick Cannon were playing rude female cashiers at a convenience store. Then The Help came out. It was a high-profile movie about segregation, ...
Article Link:
 Huffington Post article
Why 'Hidden Figures' — and its unsung heroes — is the ultimate NASA story
Yahoo News - about 1 year
NASA, and its stunning achievements, is much more than just the famous astronauts whose names you know — it was built on the behind-the-scenes work of its unsung heroes.  From the early days of the United States’ space agency up through today, NASA has been run by  engineers, mathematicians and technicians at the tops of their fields. But you rarely hear their stories or know their names.  SEE ALSO: These 'Hidden Figures' portraits profile brainy, badass women Behind every John Glenn or Neil Armstrong or Buzz Aldrin there are tens or even hundreds of people working behind the scenes to keep them alive and healthy in space. That’s NASA’s true nature — a nexus of unseen teamwork and ingenuity that allows the exploration of new frontiers. And there is perhaps no better representation of that paradigm than the story told in the new movie Hidden Figures , released Friday.  Katherine Johnson at work. Image: Nasa The film follows the lives and careers of Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan an...
Article Link:
 Yahoo News article
Christmas Eve in Space and Communion on the Moon
Wall Street Journal - about 1 year
In July 1969, sitting in the Lunar Module, Buzz Aldrin ate bread, drank wine and read from the Gospel of John.
Article Link:
 Wall Street Journal article
Where 'Passengers' Future Meets NASA's Past; Director, Writer Describe
Yahoo News - about 1 year
"Passengers," the new sci-fi movie starring Jennifer Lawrence and Chris Pratt, is set hundreds of years in the future aboard an interstellar spaceship, but it was inspired by a real astronaut's experience almost half a century in the past. "Somebody asked me once who is the most lonely person in the history of the human race and it was probably one of the moon astronauts," Jon Spaihts, who wrote the original screenplay for "Passengers," which opened in theaters on Wednesday (Dec. 21), told reporters. "When [Collins] was on the far side of the moon from [Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin], he was farther away from the nearest human than any other person had ever been.
Article Link:
 Yahoo News article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Buzz Aldrin
    FORTIES
  • 2016
    In April 2016, he released his latest book, No Dream is Too High.
  • 2013
    In June 2013, Aldrin wrote an opinion, published in The New York Times, supporting a manned mission to Mars and which viewed the Moon "not as a destination but more a point of departure, one that places humankind on a trajectory to homestead Mars and become a two-planet species."
    His book Mission to Mars was published in May 2013.
  • 2012
    Aldrin also lent his voice talents to the 2012 video game Mass Effect 3, playing a stargazer who appears in the game's final scene.
    More Details
    Aldrin appeared as himself in the Big Bang Theory episode, "The Holographic Excitation", which aired on October 25, 2012.
    In 2012, he made a cameo appearance in Japanese drama film Space Brothers.
  • 2011
    His third marriage was to Lois Driggs Cannon (1988–2011), from whom he filed for divorce on June 15, 2011, in Los Angeles, citing "irreconcilable differences". The divorce was finalized on December 28, 2012.
    More Details
    In 2011, Aldrin appeared as himself in the film Transformers: Dark of the Moon, where he explains to Optimus Prime and the Autobots that the Apollo 11 mission also discovered a Cybertronian ship on the Moon whose existence was concealed from the public.
  • THIRTIES
  • 2009
    He referred to the Phobos monolith in a July 22, 2009, interview with C-SPAN: "We should go boldly where man has not gone before.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1987
    In 1987 he founded the Space Studies graduate program at the University of North Dakota.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1973
    His autobiographies Return to Earth, published in 1973, and Magnificent Desolation, published in June 2009, both provide accounts of his struggles with clinical depression and alcoholism in the years following his NASA career.
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  • 1972
    In March 1972, Aldrin retired from active duty after 21 years of service, and returned to the Air Force in a managerial role, but his career was blighted by personal problems.
  • 1971
    After leaving NASA in July 1971, Aldrin was assigned as the Commandant of the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School at Edwards Air Force Base, California.
  • 1969
    Aldrin was chosen for the crew of Apollo 11 and made the first lunar landing with commander Neil Armstrong on July 20, 1969.
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  • OTHER
  • 1963
    Aldrin was selected as a member of the third group of NASA astronauts in October 1963.
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    In 1963 Aldrin earned a Doctor of Science degree in Astronautics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
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  • 1955
    After the war, Aldrin was assigned as an aerial gunnery instructor at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada, and next was an aide to the dean of faculty at the United States Air Force Academy, which had recently begun operations in 1955.
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  • 1953
    The June 8, 1953, issue of Life magazine featured gun camera photos taken by Aldrin of one of the Soviet pilots ejecting from his damaged aircraft.
  • 1951
    Aldrin graduated third in his class at West Point in 1951, with a Bachelor of Science degree in mechanical engineering.
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  • 1947
    After graduating from Montclair High School in 1947, Aldrin turned down a full scholarship offer from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (which he would later attend for graduate school), and went to the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York.
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  • 1930
    Aldrin was born January 20, 1930, in Mountainside Hospital, in Glen Ridge, New Jersey.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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