Claud Cockburn

Irish journalist Claud Cockburn

Francis Claud Cockburn of Brook Lodge, Youghal, County Cork, Munster, Ireland was a British journalist. He was a well known proponent of communism. His saying, "believe nothing until it has been officially denied" is widely quoted in journalistic studies. He was the second cousin, once removed, of novelists Alec Waugh and Evelyn Waugh.
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Olivia Wilde: Meet the actress with some of the coolest connections in Tinseltown - Daily Mail
Google News - over 6 years
Her life story so far reads like a Hollywood screenplay, from her fairy-tale marriage (and subsequent divorce) to her literary heritage: her grandfather was acclaimed journalist Claud Cockburn, novelist Evelyn Waugh was a relative
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The Accidental Institution - Vanity Fair
Google News - over 6 years
Claud Cockburn, Auberon Waugh, Paul Foot, and (under a chaos of pseudonyms) Christopher Booker and John Wells just paddled their own canoes. Gossip-writing hacks from established Fleet Street titles, like Nigel Dempster and Peter McKay, would moonlight
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Richard Ingrams: The country 'set' that makes a spiv of Cameron - The Independent
Google News - over 6 years
The notion of a "Cliveden Set" was first floated by Claud Cockburn, father of The Independent's Patrick, and has since become part of history. But there was never a set in any form of sense. It was just a brilliant piece of propaganda by a brilliant
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Viduramžių mentaliteto lietuviai ir sumanūs, vieningi žydai. Ar tikrai? - Amerikos lietuvis
Google News - over 6 years
Politinio žiniaraščio „Counter Punch" redaktorius Alexander Claud Cockburn (tikriausiai irgi žydas) Rusijos televizijos laidai RT.ru tiesiai pasakė, kad JAV „Kongresas yra Izraelio okupuota teritorija" (žiūr. YouTube: „Senate stands behind Israel")
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Alan Davies: AJ Cronin - The Man Who Created Doctor Finlay (Alma) - Herald Scotland
Google News - over 6 years
In his entertaining study, Bestseller, published in 1972, Claud Cockburn likened “the books that everyone read” to good quality opium. One such was The Citadel by AJ Cronin, which appeared in 1937, in which a dedicated doctor, which Cronin himself was
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One week after J Dey's murder, no answers - Hindustan Times
Google News - over 6 years
I can't say for sure who defined it thus (if you know, please email me), but in one place I saw the quote attributed to the late Claud Cockburn, an Irish journalist with communist sympathies. < P>Cockburn may not have actually said this,
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Sarah Caudwell, 60, Lawyer And Author of Mystery Novels
NYTimes - about 18 years
Sarah Caudwell, the British author whose modest but ecstatically received output of three erudite and maliciously witty mystery novels led at least one critic to compare her to Oscar Wilde, died on Jan. 28 at her home in London. She was 60. The cause was cancer, said Barney Karpfinger, her agent. Ms. Caudwell produced her first novel, ''Thus Was
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Paid Notice: Deaths COCKBURN, SARAH
NYTimes - about 18 years
COCKBURN-Sarah Caudwell, MA (Aberdeen), BA, BCL (Oxon) daughter of Jean Ross Cockburn and Claud Cockburn, lawyer, Banker and crime writer. Beloved niece of Billee, beloved of her family and friends and, indeed, beloved of all who had the privilege to know her, has died aged 60, on January 28th at her home in Whitehall. A thanksgiving party in
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Lady Caroline Blackwood, Wry Novelist, Is Dead at 64
NYTimes - about 22 years
Lady Caroline Blackwood, a writer of wry, macabre novels and essays, and a beguiling Anglo-Irish aristocrat who married the painter Lucian Freud and the poet Robert Lowell, died yesterday in the Mayfair Hotel in Manhattan, where she stayed the last few weeks while she was ill. She was 64. The cause was cancer, said her daughter Ivana Lowell. She
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Titled Bohemian; Caroline Blackwood
NYTimes - almost 23 years
WHEN LADY Caroline Blackwood, the Irish writer and Guinness heiress, was living in Paris in the early 1950's, she and her first husband, the painter Lucian Freud, were invited to visit Picasso. "Picasso got one of his followers to ask Lucian if he would like to see Picasso's paintings," Blackwood says. "Of course, Lucian said yes. Meanwhile Picasso
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Communism of the Rich and Famous
NYTimes - about 24 years
DOUBLE LIVES Spies and Writers in the Secret Soviet War of Ideas Against the West. By Stephen Koch. Illustrated. 419 pp. New York: The Free Press. $24.95. THE controlling metaphor for Stephen Koch's study of international Communist espionage and subversion is taken from Greek mythology: Ariadne, the daughter of Minos, provides the hero Theseus with
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Abroad at Home; The Iceman Cometh
NYTimes - almost 26 years
When Jerry Brown was elected Governor of California in 1974, his campaign finance director was Richard Maullin. A few years later Mr. Maullin said: "Jerry doesn't have the same attachments as other people do. He doesn't care about friends or possessions or sports. He's totally into power." The truth of that observation has been brought home to me
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CRITIC OF ISRAEL ON THE VOICE GOT AN ARAB INSTITUTE GRANT
NYTimes - about 34 years
A columnist for The Village Voice who has often been harshly critical of Israeli policies in the Middle East has acknowledged accepting a $10,000 grant from an organization called pro-Arab by its critics. The writer, Alexander Cockburn, the weekly newspaper's political commentator and media critic, received the money in 1982 from the Institute of
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WAUGH'S 'BRIDESHEAD' COMING TO TV
NYTimes - about 36 years
WITH ''Brideshead Revisited,'' Evelyn Waugh, the masterful satirist who had chronicled the frivolities of the Bright Young People in such novels as ''Decline and Fall,'' became a romantic moralist. For all its detailing of the glittering aristocratic life, ''Brideshead'' was actually a study in the workings of memory and the operation of divine
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Cockburn Services in Ireland
NYTimes - about 36 years
Services for Claud Cockburn, a British writer and social critic who died Tuesday in Cork, Ireland, will be held today near Ardmore, Ireland, where he and his wife, Patrica, lived. In addition to his wife, Mr. Cockburn is survived by three sons, Andrew, Patrick and Alexander; two daughters, Claudia Flanders of London, from his first marriage to the
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CLAUD COCKBURN, BRITISH WRITER AND SOCIAL CRITIC, IS DEAD AT 77
NYTimes - about 36 years
Claud Cockburn, a British journalist and social critic whose lively style made him something of a cult figure on the British political left, died yesterday at St. Sinbarr's Hospital in Cork, Ireland. He was 77 years old and lived in Ardmore, Ireland. Mr. Cockburn, who was also the author of well-received fiction, some of it under the pseudonym
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Claud Cockburn
    LATE ADULTHOOD
  • 1981
    Age 76
    Died in 1981.
  • FORTIES
  • 1953
    Age 48
    Among his novels were Beat the Devil (originally under the pseudonym James Helvick), The Horses, Ballantyne's Folly, and Jericho Road. Beat the Devil was made into a 1953 film by director John Huston, who paid Cockburn £3,000 for the rights to the book and screenplay.
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  • 1947
    Age 42
    In 1947, Cockburn moved to Ireland and lived at Ardmore, County Waterford, and continued to contribute to newspapers and journals, including a weekly column for The Irish Times.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1937
    Age 32
    In a 1937 article in The Week, Cockburn coined the term Cliveden set to describe what he alleged to be an upper-class pro-German group that exercised influence behind the scenes.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1933
    Age 28
    Cockburn was educated at Berkhamsted School, Berkhamstead, Hertfordshire, and Keble College, Oxford, graduating with a Bachelor of Arts. He became a journalist with The Times and worked as a foreign correspondent in Germany and the United States before resigning in 1933 to start his own newsletter, The Week.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1904
    Born
    Cockburn was born in Beijing, China, on 12 April 1904, the son of Henry Cockburn, a British Consul General, and wife Elizabeth Gordon (née Stevenson).
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