Emily Dickinson

Poet Emily Dickinson

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson was an American poet. Born in Amherst, Massachusetts, to a successful family with strong community ties, she lived a mostly introverted and reclusive life. After she studied at the Amherst Academy for seven years in her youth, she spent a short time at Mount Holyoke Female Seminary before returning to her family's house in Amherst.
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Biography
Emily Dickinson's personal information overview.
Deceased
15 May 1886

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LIVES; Lives: Restarting From Scratch
NYTimes - over 6 years
I’m not your typical undergraduate. I am a 46-year-old wife and mother with three adult children. Depending on how you count, I may be twice as old as the traditional students or essentially the same age as they are. After all, my life as I know it began 23 years ago, when, in a freakish accident, I was hit in the head by a ceiling fan in our
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Poway Resident Takes Old-Time Photos—the Old-Time Way - Patch.com
Google News - over 6 years
TwainFest is a festive, expansive celebration of Mark Twain and other 19 th century writers (Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Edgar Allan Poe), with family and community events for young and old: from a
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Wearing Emily Dickinson, Wearing Her Words - About - News & Issues
Google News - over 6 years
Philip Jenks would, and did, and chose Emily Dickinson: Philip Jenks is a poet and university lit lecturer who has devoted the skin of his whole back to a tattoo portrait of Emily Dickinson... “It's a large, powerful image that he'll occasionally
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Saturday, Aug. 27 - Advocate Weekly
Google News - over 6 years
Triple Shadow, "The Belle of Amherst," performed by Mari Andrejco as Emily Dickinson and directed by Beth Skinner, in which the audience experiences Dickinson's poetry as newly created thoughts reflecting the New England landscape and a quieter,
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Belle of Amherst: Double Vision - The Skinny
Google News - over 6 years
Rather than join this race, Kathleen Ann Thompson takes her time to tell the story of revered poet Emily Dickinson over the course of two shows; one drama, one dance, performed on alternate nights. Thomson is fragile onstage, genuinely breathless at
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Around town in San Diego - SignOnSanDiego.com
Google News - over 6 years
20 at Old Town San Diego State Historic Park, 4002 Wallace St. This celebration of Mark Twain, and other writers of the 19th century (Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Edgar Allan Poe and others) will be read
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'Wilfred' recap - Anger - TheCelebrityCafe.com
Google News - over 6 years
It opened with a quote by Emily Dickinson: “Anger as soon as fed is dead – tis starving makes it fat.” The episode opens with a flashback of a young Ryan, probably around 10-years-old, running around looking for his dog, Sneakers
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Western Mass.: History and hiking converge - Richmond Times Dispatch
Google News - over 6 years
Emily Dickinson Museum: 280 Main St., Amherst, Mass.; www.emilydickinsonmuseum.org or (413) 542-8161. By: Times-Dispatch Staff The Associated Press Some tourist attractions can be easily experienced by taking in a scenic view or driving along a famous
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Emily Dickinson talks about her poetry at the High Plains Chautauqua event - Greeley Tribune
Google News - over 6 years
Emily Dickinson, played by Debra Conner, speaks to a crowd on the Aims Community College campus as part of the 12th annual High Plains Chautauqua Wednesday night. Dickinson, sometimes called the first modern poet for her departure from
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Where Are The Biopics About Powerful American Women? - Think Progress
Google News - over 6 years
If you want Terrence Malick to make something dreamy, what about Emily Dickinson? Something sensationalistic, fun, and quietly feminist? Do Annie Oakley. I'ma nerdy Anglophile, and there are a lot of awesome British women. But it's funny that we tell
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Arts around the Mid-coast; July 8, 2011 - Times Record
Google News - over 6 years
HARPSWELL — The life of Emily Dickinson, a great American writer and eccentric recluse, will come into focus in Harpswell as actress Marion Jeffery presents the critically acclaimed one-woman show “The Belle of Amherst” starting Tuesday
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Professor presents a new take on Emily Dickinson - Spartanburg Herald Journal
Google News - over 6 years
Converse music professor Scott Robbins and recent master's graduate Donna Gallagher teamed up for an original CD that is set to the poems of Emily Dickinson. Buy Photo ALEX C. HICKS JR./alex.hicks@shj.com By Dan Armonaitis Converse College music
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Emily Dickinson and "these modern literati" - Los Angeles Times
Google News - over 6 years
"Emily Dickinson's Letters" is a charming, 4-inch by six-inch pocket book from Everyman's Library with a shiny golden ribbon placeholder. The book doesn't bother itself with completism -- her letters are excerpted -- nor does it get bogged down with
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Kate Atkinson: Week One: Interview - Telegraph.co.uk
Google News - over 6 years
As soul mates go, Kate Atkinson and Emily Dickinson are an unlikely pair. Atkinson laughs non-stop, talks faster than a getaway car, has husbands and grandchildren under her belt, plus eight novels and a collection of short stories
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The Sacred Power Of Hope - Huffington Post (blog)
Google News - over 6 years
Emily Dickinson wrote the famous line, "Hope is the thing with feathers that perches in the soul, and sings the tune without words, and never stops at all." I first encountered this poem while in junior high. I recall the teacher comparing hope to the
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2011 RFT Music Awards Winners: Best New Band: Dots Not Feathers - Riverfront Times
Google News - over 6 years
Those harmonies can soar and dip sweetly, even as the heavy fuzz and bonk of a synth suggest it has spent as much time on vintage video games as reading up on its Emily Dickinson. Even playing a post-twilight set on a patio, the sound was always sunny
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Harvard makes Emily Dickinson Bible available online - Examiner.com
Google News - over 6 years
Harvard makes Emily Dickinson Bible available online -- Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts has announced that it has made one of its valuable literary artifacts available online for scholars and interested readers
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Emily Dickinson
    FIFTIES
  • 1886
    Age 55
    On May 15, 1886, after several days of worsening symptoms, Emily Dickinson died at the age of 55.
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  • 1885
    Age 54
    On November 30, 1885, her feebleness and other symptoms were so worrying that Austin canceled a trip to Boston.
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  • 1884
    Age 53
    As death succeeded death, Dickinson found her world upended. In the fall of 1884, she wrote that "The Dyings have been too deep for me, and before I could raise my Heart from one, another has come."
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  • 1882
    Age 51
    Dickinson's mother died on November 14, 1882.
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    Two years before this, on April 1, 1882, Dickinson's "Shepherd from 'Little Girl'hood", Charles Wadsworth, also had died after a long illness.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1880
    Age 49
    In 1880 he gave her Cowden Clarke's Complete Concordance to Shakespeare (1877).
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  • 1877
    Age 46
    After the death of Lord's wife in 1877, his friendship with Dickinson probably became a late-life romance, though as their letters were destroyed, this is surmised.
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  • 1874
    Age 43
    On June 16, 1874, while in Boston, Edward Dickinson suffered a stroke and died.
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  • 1872
    Age 41
    Otis Phillips Lord, an elderly judge on the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court from Salem, in 1872 or 1873 became an acquaintance of Dickinson's.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1869
    Age 38
    Although the household servant of nine years, Margaret O Brien, had married and left the Homestead that same year, it was not until 1869 that her family brought in a permanent household servant, Margaret Maher, to replace the old one.
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  • 1868
    Age 37
    When Higginson urged her to come to Boston in 1868 so that they could formally meet for the first time, she declined, writing: "Could it please your convenience to come so far as Amherst I should be very glad, but I do not cross my Father's ground to any House or town".
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  • 1867
    Age 36
    Around this time, Dickinson's behavior began to change. She did not leave the Homestead unless it was absolutely necessary and as early as 1867, she began to talk to visitors from the other side of a door rather than speaking to them face to face.
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  • 1866
    Age 35
    In direct opposition to the immense productivity that she displayed in the early 1860s, Dickinson wrote fewer poems in 1866.
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  • 1862
    Age 31
    Dickinson valued his advice, going from calling him "Mr. Higginson" to "Dear friend" as well as signing her letters, "Your Gnome" and "Your Scholar". His interest in her work certainly provided great moral support; many years later, Dickinson told Higginson that he had saved her life in 1862.
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    Dickinson's decision to contact Higginson suggests that by 1862 she was contemplating publication and that it may have become increasingly difficult to write poetry without an audience.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1858
    Age 27
    It was from 1858 to 1861 that Dickinson is believed to have written a trio of letters that have been called "The Master Letters".
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    The forty fascicles she created from 1858 through 1865 eventually held nearly eight hundred poems.
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    Withdrawing more and more from the outside world, Emily began in the summer of 1858 what would be her lasting legacy.
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    Writing to a friend in summer 1858, Emily said that she would visit if she could leave "home, or mother.
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  • 1856
    Age 25
    Sue married Austin in 1856 after a four-year courtship, though their marriage was not a happy one.
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  • 1855
    Age 24
    Despite seeing him only twice after 1855 (he moved to San Francisco in 1862), she variously referred to him as "my Philadelphia", "my Clergyman", "my dearest earthly friend" and "my Shepherd from 'Little Girl'hood".
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    Until 1855, Dickinson had not strayed far from Amherst.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1850
    Age 19
    In early 1850, Dickinson wrote that "Amherst is alive with fun this winter...
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  • 1849
    Age 18
    Her brother smuggled a copy of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's Kavanagh into the house for her (because her father might disapprove) and a friend lent her Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre in late 1849.
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  • 1848
    Age 17
    Whatever the specific reason for leaving Holyoke, her brother Austin appeared on March 25, 1848, to "bring her home at all events".
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  • 1847
    Age 16
    During the last year of her stay at the Academy, Emily became friendly with Leonard Humphrey, its popular new young principal. After finishing her final term at the Academy on August 10, 1847, Dickinson began attending Mary Lyon's Mount Holyoke Female Seminary (which later became Mount Holyoke College) in South Hadley, about ten miles (16 km) from Amherst.
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  • 1845
    Age 14
    In 1845, a religious revival took place in Amherst, resulting in 46 confessions of faith among Dickinson's peers.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1840
    Age 9
    On September 7, 1840, Dickinson and her sister Lavinia started together at Amherst Academy, a former boys' school that had opened to female students just two years earlier.
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  • 1830
    Born
    Emily Elizabeth Dickinson was born at the family's homestead in Amherst, Massachusetts, on December 10, 1830, into a prominent, but not wealthy, family.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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