Enda Walsh

Irish dramatist Enda Walsh

Enda Walsh is an Irish playwright. Born in Dublin he is living in London. Walsh attended the same secondary school in which Roddy Doyle and Paul Mercier taught. After writing for the Dublin Youth Theatre, he moved to Cork where he wrote Fishy Tales for the Graffiti Theatre Company, followed by Ginger Ale Boy for Corcadorca Theatre Company. His main breakthrough came with the production of his play Disco Pigs in collaboration with director Pat Kiernan of Corcadorca.
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Review: A Fantasy Town Builds a Wall Against Time in ‘Ballyturk’
NYTimes - about 1 month
Enda Walsh’s wild cosmic farce, in which two men act out the life of a fantasy village, finds the aching emptiness in words, words, words.
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 NYTimes article
For Evanna Lynch, Life After Luna Lovegood Is A Different Kind Of Magic
Huffington Post - 9 months
Earlier this year, Evanna Lynch ― the actress who got her start when she was cast at Luna Lovegood in the “Harry Potter” film series ― announced on Instagram that she was ready to take on new endeavors. “I feel like I’m stuck in my 18-year-old self artistically when I actually have a lot more to say,” the actress wrote on Instagram, addressing her choice to move on from regularly attending “Harry Potter” conventions. Now, just a few months later, she’s starring in a forthcoming play in London, an update on Enda Walsh’s “Disco Pigs,” a story about a pair of teens who speak in their own intimate, expressive language. Lynch says the play is in keeping with the types of roles she hopes to pursue in the future: bold characters and unabashed misfits. Below, Lynch discusses her recent starring role in the indie film “My Name is Emily,” and why she can’t help but return to Hogwarts stories, which, she says, have a “resetting effect” on her. First, I’d ...
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 Huffington Post article
Review: The Private Dystopias of ‘Arlington’ and ‘Rooms’
NYTimes - 10 months
In the drama “Arlington” and the installation “Rooms,” the Irish playwright Enda Walsh conjures a subversive throng of unreliable narrators.
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 NYTimes article
‘Enda Walsh in NYC,’ a Double Dose of Bracing Irish Isolation
NYTimes - 10 months
The playwright who wrote “Lazarus” with David Bowie gets a kind of mini-festival in New York.
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 NYTimes article
What David Bowie's Turn As A Sci-Fi Star Can Teach Us About Grief
Huffington Post - about 2 years
In 1976, British filmmaker Nicolas Roeg directed the cult science-fiction film "The Man Who Fell to Earth." The movie, based on Walter Tevis' 1963 novel of the same name, tells the story of Thomas Jerome Newton, a human-like extraterrestrial who, in a search for water for his drought-riddled home planet, finds himself tragically marooned on Earth. In one of the most fated casting choices in cinematic history, the starring role went to the late David Bowie, the musician who rose to fame on the wings of a song dubbed "Space Oddity" and would go on to adopt the mythic pseudonym, Ziggy Stardust.  "Bowie, slender, elegant, remote, evokes this alien so successfully that one could say, without irony, this was a role he was born to play," Roger Ebert wrote in 2011. As a result, critics like Joshua Rothkopf called the film "the most intellectually provocative genre film of the 1970s." As Newton, Bowie acts out the travails of a hyper-intelligent being transitioning from doomed ...
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 Huffington Post article
Legendary Singer David Bowie Dead At 69
Huffington Post - about 2 years
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 Huffington Post article
Review: In ‘The Last Hotel,’ a Pair Weighs Whether Someone Checks Out for Good
NYTimes - about 2 years
What at first seems a love triangle turns quickly into something darker in Donnacha Dennehy and Enda Walsh’s work, at St. Ann’s Warehouse.
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 NYTimes article
Aisle View: David Bowie Falls to Earth
Huffington Post - about 2 years
Michael C. Hall in Lazarus. Photo: Jan Versweyveld "Is there an end to it?" someone cried out an hour into the new musical at New York Theatre Workshop. "When do you think I can leave? It has to be soon!" Only it was not some perplexed subscriber, trying to escape from the middle of one of those long rows of 22 seats with no center aisle. It was Michael C. Hall, the leading man. Welcome to the world of Lazarus, the instant sellout by David Bowie and Enda Walsh, directed by Ivo van Hove and inspired by the novel "The Man Who Fell to Earth" by Walter Tevis. Having made little sense of the performance, I went to read synopses of the 1963 novel and the 1976 film version (which starred Bowie). Neither synopsis, alas, sheds much light on what happens in the musical--after the fact, at least--and it doesn't seem to have much to do with the biblical Lazarus, either. Thomas Newton (Hall, of TV's "Dexter") is a mysterious man--or alien?--living in a rectangular box of a set, subsistin...
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 Huffington Post article
The odd couple: why Roald Dahl’s The Twits makes such a good play
Guardian (UK) - almost 3 years
The writer Enda Walsh and two of the directors who are adapting Dahl’s dark tale of the vile, bullying couple Mr and Mrs Twit for the theatre, explain how it taps in to kids’ love of cruelty, violence and social justice When I meet the playwright Enda Walsh, his nine-year-old daughter hasn’t yet seen his version of The Twits – it is still in rehearsal – but he had explained the story to her. She was particularly upset by one strand: a trick the vile Mr and Mrs Twit play on the stuttering Waltzer Boy, humiliating him horribly in front of a crowd of pretty girls. “She said, ‘And what happens to the Twits? Do they die at the end?’ So I had to say,” Walsh puts on a tentative, break-it-gently grownup voice, “‘Well yes, they do, darling, I suppose, yeah, you could say they do die at the end.’ And she said …” Walsh pauses, taking a deep breath in order to convey the full force of her reaction: “‘GOOD!’” Childhood, as Roald Dahl knew, is a complicated, unsentimental affair. He created chara...
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 Guardian (UK) article
A Heartbreaking and Healing <i>Once</i> at the Oriental Theatre
Huffington Post - over 4 years
You'd be hard pressed to think of anything more intimate than the act of making music. Through music, one exposes themselves in a way that transcends mere talking or movement. It's the ultimate exposure of one's soul. And such rawness makes for compelling storytelling. Once, the 2012 Best Musical Tony winner based on the 2006 Irish film, celebrates music's innate power. Chicago is lucky to host the stellar first national tour of this stunning new work for a short few weeks, and it's a must-see. Directed by John Tiffany with book by Enda Walsh and songs by Glen Hansard and Markéta Irglová, Once offers an unlikely love story between two lost souls who find each other through music -- and rediscover themselves along the way. And oh what music it is. Featuring an ensemble of equally talented actor-singer-musicians, this is the kind of show that must give casting directors nightmares. And the cast of this first-rate national tour possibly couldn't be bettered. Led by Stuart Ward and D...
Article Link:
 Huffington Post article
Tim Cummings' Passage to <em>The Normal Heart</em>
Huffington Post - over 4 years
Those who detect a thaw in the cold war between the New York and Los Angeles theatre worlds must be smoking something: just because Larry Kramer's Normal Heart has returned to Los Angeles after 16 years does not mean that the Coasts are viewing each other with any less suspicion. The tiny but much-lauded Fountain Theatre in L.A. is hosting, and New York-born and -bred Tim Cummings tackles the explosive lead character, Ned Weeks -- a thinly disguised fictional incarnation of the activist playwright, whose outrage fueled the emergence of the gay rights movement. I caught up with Cummings in between rehearsals at the Fountain and, although he belongs to that rare breed of actor who convincingly plays heroes and villains, sad-sacks and kings, romantic leads and slow-witted fishmongers, he exuded apprehension and awe at the immensity of this role. Earlier this year, Cummings stormed the stage at Disney Hall in the role of larger-than-life Ballets Russes genius Serge Diaghilev, backed ...
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 Huffington Post article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Enda Walsh
    FORTIES
  • 2014
    His new play Ballyturk premiered at the 2014 Galway Arts Festival starring Cilian Murphy, Stephen Rea and Mikel Murfi.
  • 2011
    He has written the musical Once, an adaptation of the Oscar-winning film Once, which appeared off-Broadway in December 2011 and January 2012 and transferred to Broadway from March 2012 and to London's West End from March 2013: it has won numerous awards, including 8 Tony Awards and a Grammy Award (see below), and has recently been nominated for 6 Laurence Olivier Awards, including Best New Musical.
    He participated in the Bush Theatre's 2011 project Sixty Six Books, for which he wrote a piece based upon a book of the King James Bible.
  • 2010
    He wrote an adaptation of his play Chatroom for a film directed by Hideo Nakata which was selected for the Un Certain Regard section at the 2010 Cannes Film Festival.
    More Details
  • THIRTIES
  • 2009
    Hunger won numerous awards (see below) including the Caméra d'Or award at the Cannes Film Festival, Best Film Award from the Evening Standard British Film Awards 2009 and a nomination for Best British Film at the 62nd British Academy Film Awards.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1999
    Enda won the 1999 Cork Film Centre/RTÉ Short Script Award for his short film Not a Bad Christmas.
    More Details
  • 1997
    Winner of the 1997 Stewart Parker and the George Devine Awards, he won the 2006 Abbey Theatre Writer in Association Award and the 2010 Obie Award for playwriting.
    More Details
  • OTHER
  • 1967
    Born in 1967.
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