Fredric March

actor Fredric March

Fredric March was an American stage and film actor. He won the Academy Award for Best Actor in 1932 for Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and in 1946 for The Best Years of Our Lives. March is the only actor to win both the Academy Award and the Tony Award for acting twice.
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'The Artist': Can a silent flick speak to Oscar today? - Los Angeles Times
Google News - over 6 years
William Wellman's 1937 rendition starring Fredric March and Janet Gaynor scored seven bids, including best picture, director, actor and actress. George Cukor's 1954 classic earned six bids, including nominations for James Mason and Judy Garland,
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Burt Lancaster on TCM: THE LEOPARD, SCORPIO, THE KILLERS - Alt Film Guide (blog)
Google News - over 6 years
Kirk Douglas co-stars as Lancaster's nemesis, but the acting honors in Seven Days in May go Fredric March as the beleaguered pro-peace president and Ava Gardner in a small role as a woman in Douglas' past. Edmond O'Brien received a Best Supporting
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Christinan Bale to Join A STAR IS BORN Remake? - Broadway World
Google News - over 6 years
The original 1937 film was produced by David O. Selznick and starred Janet Gaynor and Fredric March. A Star Is Born has been remade twice, in 1954 with Judy Garland and James Mason, and in 1976 with Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson
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At Large with Tom Williams > A look at some films & film classics - Shore News Today
Google News - over 6 years
Stewart was nominated for an Oscar as best actor (Fredric March won for The Best Years of Our Lives). Vertigo (1958). Another Hitchcock classic. Stewart is a retired detective who cannot handle heights. But he solves a crime that tries to make use of
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Sesión de tarde con Franco - El País.com (España)
Google News - over 6 years
Como mínimo, Caparrós ha encontrado una en la lista que estaba prohibida entonces: Cristóbal Colón, de Fredric March, que se exhibió en El Pardo en 1950. Con cinco años de retraso con relación a su estreno internacional, el 12 de enero de 1947,
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Jeff Bridges on Piers Morgan: a great American triumphs over a hollow Brit - Baltimore Sun (blog)
Google News - over 6 years
Working with actors like Fredric March and Robert Ryan convinced Bridges that acting could be a life-long calling. It was terrific that Bridges brought Johnson to mind and even fondly mimicked his deep voice -- after all, just a few months ago,
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Jon Polito - A.V. Club Chicago
Google News - over 6 years
But I always wanted to play that role, Howard, because from the first time I saw the play and the movie, the early version with Fredric March and the television version with Lee J. Cobb, when it got to the scene where Willy Loman goes to the young boss
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Cranky Hanke's Screening Room: The 100 Best? - Mountain Xpress
Google News - over 6 years
However, how can a movie in which Fredric March and Nancy Carroll don bearskin rugs and growl at each other not be on such a list? That last reason is also one of the primary reasons that it's really impossible for anyone to actually churn out a
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EXCLUSIVE: Death Takes a Holiday Will Get a Cast Album; Kevin Earley Will Sing ... - Playbill.com
Google News - over 6 years
There have been movie versions of the property, including a 1934 picture starring Fredric March and "Meet Joe Black" (1998), starring Brad Pitt and Anthony Hopkins. "Each time they remake it," Stone said of the film versions, "it's farther from the
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Star Departs Roundabout's 'Death Takes a Holiday' - New York Times (blog)
Google News - over 6 years
... is based on the 1924 Italian play “La Morte in Vacanza,” by Alberto Casella, though its story is perhaps best known in the United States from film adaptations, including the 1934 “Death Takes a Holiday” starring Fredric March and a 1998 version,
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THEATER REVIEW | 'DEATH TAKES A HOLIDAY'; Set Aside That Scythe, And Let's Put on a Show
NYTimes - over 6 years
Lamenting the overwhelming burden of his job in one lush, soaring number after another, the Grim Reaper sings like a dream in the new musical ''Death Takes a Holiday.'' As played by the handsome British actor Julian Ovenden, he looks pretty slick too, particularly when he dons the guise of a Russian prince to play hooky from his corpse-culling
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What's On Today
NYTimes - over 6 years
8 P.M. (TCM) LITERARY ROMANCE Turner Classic Movies presents five films adapted from beloved novels, starting with ''Pride and Prejudice'' (1940), the Jane Austen classic about five sisters out to nab husbands in 19th-century England, the better to produce an heir to save the family farm. Greer Garson plays Elizabeth Bennet, the eldest, most
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Death Becomes a Soaring Tenor
NYTimes - over 6 years
''I WAS looking for Cary Grant with high notes,'' the director Doug Hughes said, describing the job requirements for the role of the not-so-Grim Reaper in his Roundabout Theater Company production of ''Death Takes a Holiday.'' ''A gift for light comedy, a gift for sincerity -- gifts that don't often coexist -- and a great singer. It's a combination
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Video Reviews: Wacky 'Rango' is Western run amuck - Providence Journal
Google News - over 6 years
... Romance” has “Little Women,” with Elizabeth Taylor and Margaret O'Brien; “Pride and Prejudice” with Laurence Olivier and Greer Garson; “Madame Bovary” starring Jennifer Jones and James Mason; and “Anna Karenina,” with Greta Garbo and Fredric March
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The Greatest Hollywood Director You May Never Have Heard Of - Huffington Post (blog)
Google News - over 6 years
The film follows the readjustments to civilian life faced by three veterans: Fred Derry (Dana Andrews), an officer coming back to a dead-end job, Al Stephenson (Fredric March), an older soldier returning to family and a stable career, and Homer Parrish
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On Stage: Jersey City native creates 'Death Takes a Holiday' musical - NorthJersey.com
Google News - over 6 years
It became best known as a 1934 film, starring Fredric March. (A 1998 Hollywood remake with Brad Pitt, under the title "Meet Joe Black," was a flop.) Now it's returning to the stage as a musical. Currently in previews, it opens July 21 at the Roundabout
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Their home is a true sanctuary - Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Google News - over 6 years
By Jackie Loohauis-Bennett of the Journal Sentinel Before Kym Davidson could turn her church into her home, she had to cope with rampaging raccoons, a marauding tree, Fredric March and a mystery no one has solved. So by any measure, Davidson's home
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Fredric March
    LATE ADULTHOOD
  • 1975
    Age 77
    Died on April 14, 1975.
  • 1970
    Age 72
    Following surgery for prostate cancer in 1970, it seemed his career was over, yet he managed to give one last performance in The Iceman Cometh (1973), as the complicated Irish saloon keeper, Harry Hope.
  • 1960
    Age 62
    March co-starred with Spencer Tracy in the 1960 Stanley Kramer film Inherit the Wind, in which he played a dramatized version of famous orator and political figure William Jennings Bryan.
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  • 1959
    Age 61
    On February 12, 1959, March appeared before a joint session of the 86th United States Congress, reading of the Gettysburg Address as part of a commemorations of the 150th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln's birth.
  • FIFTIES
  • 1957
    Age 59
    In 1957, March was awarded The George Eastman Award, given by George Eastman House for "distinguished contribution to the art of film."
  • 1954
    Age 56
    On March 25, 1954, March co-hosted the 26th Annual Academy Awards ceremony from New York City, with co-host Donald O'Connor in Los Angeles.
  • 1951
    Age 53
    March later regretted turning down the role and finally played Willy Loman in Columbia Pictures's 1951 film version of the play, directed by Laslo Benedek, receiving his fifth-and-final Oscar nomination as well as a Golden Globe Award.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1946
    Age 48
    He also starred in such films as I Married a Witch (1942) and Another Part of the Forest (1948) during this period, and won his second Oscar in 1946 for The Best Years of Our Lives.
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  • 1945
    Age 47
    March made several spoken word recordings, including a version of Oscar Wilde's The Selfish Giant issued in 1945, in which he narrated and played the title role, and The Sounds of History, a twelve volume LP set accompanying the twelve volume set of books The Life History of the United States, published by Time-Life.
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  • 1944
    Age 46
    He also had major successes in A Bell for Adano in 1944 and Gideon in 1961, and played Ibsen's An Enemy of the People on Broadway in 1951.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1937
    Age 39
    He returned to Broadway after a ten-year absence in 1937 with a notable flop Yr.
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  • 1932
    Age 34
    He won the Academy Award for Best Actor for the 6th Academy Awards in 1932 for Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (tied with Wallace Beery for The Champ, although March accrued one more vote than Beery), leading to a series of classic films based on stage hits and classic novels like Design for Living (1933) with Gary Cooper and Miriam Hopkins, Death Takes a Holiday (1934), Les Misérables (1935) with Charles Laughton, Anna Karenina (1935) with Greta Garbo, Anthony Adverse (1936) with Olivia de Havilland, and as the original Norman Maine in A Star is Born (1937) with Janet Gaynor, for which he received his third Oscar nomination.
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  • 1930
    Age 32
    March received an Oscar nomination for the 4th Academy Awards in 1930 for The Royal Family of Broadway, in which he played a role based upon John Barrymore.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1927
    Age 29
    March was married to actress Florence Eldridge from 1927 until his death in 1975, and they had two adopted children.
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  • 1926
    Age 28
    He appeared on Broadway in 1926, and by the end of the decade signed a film contract with Paramount Pictures.
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  • 1920
    Age 22
    He began a career as a banker, but an emergency appendectomy caused him to reevaluate his life, and in 1920 he began working as an extra in movies made in New York City, using a shortened form of his mother's maiden name.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1897
    Born
    Born on August 31, 1897.
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