George Kingdom

King of the United Kingdom George Kingdom

George III was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until the union of these two countries on 1 January 1801, after which he was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. He was concurrently Duke and prince-elector of Brunswick-Lüneburg in the Holy Roman Empire until his promotion to King of Hanover on 12 October 1814.
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Biography
George III of the United Kingdom's personal information overview.
home town
Great Britain
Death Place
Windsor

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  • 1820
    He died at Windsor Castle at 8:38 pm on 29 January 1820, six days after the death of his fourth son, the Duke of Kent.
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  • 1819
    At Christmas 1819, he spoke nonsense for 58 hours, and for the last few weeks of his life was unable to walk.
  • 1811
    Despite signs of a recovery in May 1811, by the end of the year George had become permanently insane and lived in seclusion at Windsor Castle until his death. Prime Minister Spencer Perceval was assassinated in 1812 and was replaced by Lord Liverpool.
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    He accepted the need for the Regency Act of 1811, and the Prince of Wales acted as Regent for the remainder of George III's life.
  • 1810
    In late 1810, at the height of his popularity but already virtually blind with cataracts and in pain from rheumatism, George III became dangerously ill.
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  • 1809
    George III made no further major political decisions during his reign; the replacement of the Duke of Portland by Perceval in 1809 was of little actual significance.
  • 1804
    In 1804, George's recurrent illness returned; after his recovery, Addington resigned and Pitt regained power.
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  • 1803
    George's review of 27,000 volunteers in Hyde Park, London, on 26 and 28 October 1803 and at the height of the invasion scare, attracted an estimated 500,000 spectators on each day.
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  • 1801
    In October 1801, he made peace with the French, and in 1802 signed the Treaty of Amiens.
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  • 1793
    France declared war on Great Britain in 1793; in the war attempt, George allowed Pitt to increase taxes, raise armies, and suspend the right of habeas corpus. The First Coalition to oppose revolutionary France, which included Austria, Prussia, and Spain, broke up in 1795 when Prussia and Spain made separate peace with France.
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  • 1786
    After George’s recovery, his popularity, and that of Pitt, continued to increase at the expense of Fox and the Prince of Wales. His humane and understanding treatment of two insane assailants, Margaret Nicholson in 1786 and John Frith in 1790, contributed to his popularity.
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  • 1785
    When John Adams was appointed American Minister to London in 1785, George had become resigned to the new relationship between his country and the former colonies.
  • 1783
    In 1783, the House of Commons forced Shelburne from office and his government was replaced by the Fox–North Coalition.
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  • 1782
    He was fond of his children, and was devastated at the death of two of his sons in infancy in 1782 and 1783 respectively.
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  • 1781
    In late 1781, the news of Lord Cornwallis's surrender at the Siege of Yorktown reached London; Lord North's parliamentary support ebbed away and he resigned the following year.
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  • 1772
    The subsequent bill was unpopular in Parliament, including among George's own ministers, but passed as the Royal Marriages Act 1772.
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  • 1770
    In 1770, his brother Prince Henry, Duke of Cumberland and Strathearn, was exposed as an adulterer, and the following year Cumberland married a young widow, Anne Horton.
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  • 1767
    Lord Chatham fell ill in 1767, and the Duke of Grafton took over the government, although he did not formally become Prime Minister until 1768.
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  • 1766
    Lord Rockingham, with the support of Pitt and the King, repealed Grenville's unpopular Stamp Act, but his government was weak and he was replaced in 1766 by Pitt, whom George created Earl of Chatham.
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  • 1763
    In 1763, after concluding the Peace of Paris which ended the war, Lord Bute resigned, allowing the Whigs under George Grenville to return to power.
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  • 1762
    In 1762, George purchased Buckingham House (on the site now occupied by Buckingham Palace) for use as a family retreat.
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  • 1761
    On 8 September 1761 in the Chapel Royal, St James's Palace, the King married Princess Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, whom he met on their wedding day.
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  • 1760
    The following year, at the age of 22, George succeeded to the throne when his grandfather, George II, died suddenly on 25 October 1760, two weeks before his 77th birthday.
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  • 1759
    In 1759, George was smitten with Lady Sarah Lennox, sister of the Duke of Richmond, but Lord Bute advised against the match and George abandoned his thoughts of marriage. "I am born for the happiness or misery of a great nation," he wrote, "and consequently must often act contrary to my passions."
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  • 1756
    In the spring of 1756, as George approached his eighteenth birthday, the King offered him a grand establishment at St James's Palace, but George refused the offer, guided by his mother and her confidant, Lord Bute, who would later serve as Prime Minister.
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  • 1751
    George's grandfather, King George II, disliked the Prince of Wales and took little interest in his grandchildren. However, in 1751 the Prince of Wales died unexpectedly from a lung injury, and George became heir apparent to the throne.
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  • 1738
    Born in 1738.
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