George S. Patton

Canada Armygeneral George S. Patton

George Smith Patton, Jr. was an officer in the United States Army best known for his leadership as a general during World War II. He also developed a reputation for eccentricity and for sometimes-controversial gruff outspokenness—such as during his profanity-laced speech to his expeditionary troops. He was on the U.S. 1912 Olympic pentathlon team and also designed the U.S. Cavalry's last combat saber: the "Patton Saber" (the M-1913).
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Death Place
Germany

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Fort Snelling Military Museum gets orders to move out - Minnesota Public Radio
Google News - over 6 years
His job as a private first class involved working with engineers on demolitions in France and Germany under the direction of the legendary General George Patton. "For me, it's hard to think that all this has deteriorated so fast and these volunteers
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Five King City golfers play in OGA series - The Regal Courier
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Five King City Men's Golf Club members stomped their feet so hard at the Spring Hill OGA Senior Tour Series in Albany that the golf gods had to listen. George Patton, Jack Croll, Frank Hoehna, Jim Trees and Jay Robinson answered the
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The beginning of the end of the welfare state - WND.com
Google News - over 6 years
George Patton's 3rd Army tanks made a hole and sped through the German lines, even making it to the east side of Moselle River, the last natural defensive barrier before the German homeland. The order came to stop in their tracks
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WW II Then and Now: Stationed in the desert - Canton Repository
Google News - over 6 years
George Patton. In his autobiography, Rex (standing, left) calls this photo “Dominick and friends.” By Anonymous “World War II was in full swing. My buddies were getting drafted or enlisting. I figured, what the heck, I might as well go in too,” said
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Military notes: Museum will honor Gen. George Patton's veterans - The Desert Sun
Google News - over 6 years
George Patton at an 11 am ceremony on Veterans Day, Nov. 11. The museum is inviting Coachella Valley residents who fought under Patton's command and their family members to register for the event by calling (760) 341-3455 to receive a “VIP” pass for
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Sharpening The Blade - Blackanthem.com
Google News - over 6 years
First Army's lineage includes some very recognizable names such as "Black" Jack Pershing, George Marshall, Douglas MacArthur, Omar Bradley, and George Patton. It also boasts some significant historical milestones including the reduction of the Saint
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VIDEO: Eli on preseason loss to Panthers - New York Daily News (blog)
Google News - over 6 years
He reminds me of George Patton! Dye, can you give me three reasons why you are a Giants fan? How about one? Are you a Giants fan? I'm not saying that you don't have the right to voice your opinion, that's all good, but I've never seen a positive post
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Smell like Old Blood and Guts: US Army launch cologne named after Gen George ... - Daily Mail
Google News - over 6 years
By Daily Mail Reporter Well now you can it seems, courtesy of the US Army, who have licensed an official fragrance called Patton after eccentric World War II hero General George S. Patton. The cologne, by Parfumologie, is being sold for army veterans
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Obama shellacked again - Boston Herald
Google News - over 6 years
George Patton America is a center-right nation but we will, under the right conditions, vote for a liberal — even an extreme liberal. We might vote for a lush, a Lothario, perhaps even a lunatic. But there is one thing Americans will not abide: A
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Palm Desert, California - San Diego Reader
Google News - over 6 years
Originally inhabited by Cahuilla Indian farmers, it then served as training grounds for General George Patton's Third Army. After World War II, a Los Angeles developer began to develop the Palm Desert area into his vision of a dream community
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Whosr money is dirty or clean, anyway? - Times of Swaziland
Google News - over 6 years
General George Patton said, "it is the risk that makes the chase exciting." General Colin Powell said; "once the dice have left your hands, there is nothing to do but watch how they come up
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Learn something new at Osher summer lectures - Hilton Head Island Packet
Google News - over 6 years
Topics include: "Wonderful World of Coney Island," Tuesday, University of South Carolina Beaufort Hilton Head Gateway campus; "Satchmo: The life of Louis Armstrong," Wednesday, Pineland Station, Hilton Head; "General George Patton," Thursday,
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Eclectic collection reveals many interests - Atlanta Journal Constitution
Google News - over 6 years
Martin Luther King Jr., John Belushi, Amelia Earhart, George Patton and, because he is a Southern boy from Alabama, Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee. Patton and Lee, now those two and the things they touched, he says, are among his favorites
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Cemetery tour remembers leaders of past - Vadnais Heights Press
Google News - over 6 years
George Patton and authored a prayer that may have changed the course of World War II. As St. John in the Wilderness Episcopal Church celebrates its 150th anniversary, church members are remembering leaders who helped shape the history of the church,
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WWII veteran from Harvey fought in Patton's Army - NOLA.com
Google News - over 6 years
George Patton's 3rd Army. "Here I was, leaving mama and papa, hoping they would be there when I come back from the war," Loyacano said. A year after training, he boarded the English ship Aquatina and left New York for Scotland
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The POW and the watch - Tbo.com
Google News - over 6 years
When George Patton's Third Army later freed the nearby town of Moosburg, Woehrle checked the time on his watch and wrote notes on an envelope. By AUSTIN CONSIDINE | New York Times News Service On April 29, 1945, Allied captives at Stalag VII A,
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Two King City golfers are sure-fire winners - The Regal Courier
Google News - over 6 years
WINNERS ALL AROUND —At the recent Super Seniors Golf Tournament, George Patton (left) was the low net winner in his flight and won the trophy on the table, and Jim Trees came in third in the flight; both won gift certificates
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of George S. Patton
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  • 1945
    Patton died in Germany on December 21, 1945, as a result of injuries from an automobile accident twelve days earlier.
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    General Henri Giraud was incredulous when he heard of Patton's dismissal by Eisenhower in late 1945, and invited him to Paris to be decorated by President Charles de Gaulle at a state banquet.
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    On February 1, 1945, Eisenhower wrote a memo ranking the military capabilities of his subordinate American generals in Europe.
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    His final media blowup occurred in September 1945, when goaded by reporters about Denazification, he said "Denazification would be like removing all the Republicans and all the Democrats who were in office, who had held office or were quasi Democrats or Republicans and that would take some time."
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    On December 8, 1945, Patton's chief of staff, Major General Hobart Gay, invited him on a pheasant hunting trip near Speyer to lift his spirits.
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    On September 28, 1945, after a heated exchange with Eisenhower over his statements, Patton was relieved of his military governorship.
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    Gordon actually loved a young married captain who left her despondent when he went home to his wife in September 1945.
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    On April 14, 1945 Patton was promoted to general, a promotion long advocated by Stimson in recognition of Patton's battle accomplishments during 1944.
    On March 26, 1945, Patton sent Task Force Baum, consisting of 314 men, 16 tanks, and assorted other vehicles, behind German lines to liberate a prisoner of war camp, OFLAG XIII-B near Hammelburg.
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    By February, the Germans were in full retreat. On February 23, 1945, the U.S. 94th Infantry Division crossed the Saar and established a vital bridgehead at Serrig through which Patton pushed units into the Saarland.
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  • 1944
    Fuller's review of Third Army records differs only in the number of enemy killed and wounded, stating that between August 1, 1944 and May 9, 1945, 47,500 of the enemy were killed, 115,700 wounded, and 1,280,688 captured, for a total of 1,443,888.
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    Patton's offensive came to a halt on August 31, 1944, as the Third Army ran out of fuel near the Moselle River, just outside Metz.
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    Sailing to Normandy throughout July, Patton's Third Army formed on the extreme right (west) of the Allied land forces. Patton's Third Army became operational at noon on August 1, 1944, under Bradley's Twelfth United States Army Group.
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    Patton was ordered to keep a low profile to deceive the Germans into thinking he was in Dover throughout early 1944, when he was actually training the Third Army.
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    The German High Command had more respect for Patton than for any other Allied commander and considered him central to any plan to invade Europe from the United Kingdom. Because of this, Patton was made a prominent figure in the deception operation, Fortitude, in early 1944.
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    This duty kept Patton busy in early 1944 preparing for the pending invasion.
    On January 26, 1944 Patton was formally given command of the Third United States Army in England, a newly arrived unit, and assigned to prepare its inexperienced soldiers for combat in Europe.
  • 1943
    Two high-profile incidents of Patton striking subordinates during the Sicily campaign attracted national controversy following the end of the campaign. On August 3, 1943, Patton slapped and verbally abused Private Charles H. Kuhl at an evacuation hospital in Nicosia after he had been found to suffer from "battle fatigue".
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    Patton's I Armored Corps was officially redesignated the Seventh Army just before his force of 90,000 landed before dawn on D-Day, July 10, 1943, on beaches near the town of Licata.
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    Patton oversaw the conversion of Casablanca into a military port and hosted the Casablanca Conference in January 1943.
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  • 1942
    The landings, which took place on November 8, 1942, were opposed by Vichy French forces, but Patton's men quickly gained a beachhead and pushed through fierce resistance.
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    Under General Dwight D. Eisenhower, Patton was assigned to help plan the Allied invasion of French North Africa as part of Operation Torch in the summer of 1942.
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  • 1941
    He commenced these exercises in late 1941 and continued them into the summer of 1942.
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    Patton led the division during the Tennessee Maneuvers in June 1941, and was lauded for his leadership, executing 48 hours' worth of planned objectives in only nine.
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  • 1940
    In December 1940, he staged a high-profile mass exercise in which 1,000 tanks and vehicles were driven from Columbus, Georgia, to Panama City, Florida, and back.
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    During maneuvers the Third Army conducted in 1940, Patton served as an umpire, where he met Adna R. Chaffee Jr. and the two formulated recommendations to develop an armored force.
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  • 1938
    Patton was promoted to colonel on July 24, 1938 and given command of the 5th Cavalry at Fort Clark, Texas, for six months, a post he relished, but he was reassigned to Fort Myer again in December as commander of the 3rd Cavalry.
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  • 1937
    Patton continued playing polo and sailing in this time. After sailing back to Los Angeles for extended leave in 1937, he was kicked by a horse and fractured his leg.
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    In 1937, he wrote a paper with the title "Surprise" which predicted, with what D'Este termed "chilling accuracy," a surprise attack by the Japanese on Hawaii.
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  • 1934
    Patton was promoted to lieutenant colonel in the regular Army on March 1, 1934, and was transferred to the Hawaiian Division in early 1935 to serve as G-2.
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  • 1932
    In July 1932, Patton was executive officer of the 3rd Cavalry, which was ordered to Washington by Army Chief of Staff General Douglas MacArthur.
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  • 1931
    Patton left this office in 1931, returned to Massachusetts and attended the Army War College, becoming a "Distinguished Graduate" in June 1932.
  • 1927
    Patton was made G-3 of the Hawaiian Division for several months, before being transferred in May 1927 to the Office of the Chief of Cavalry in Washington, D.C., where he began to develop the concepts of mechanized warfare.
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  • 1925
    He was temporarily appointed to the General Staff Corps in Boston, Massachusetts, before being reassigned as G-1 and G-2 of the Hawaiian Division at Schofield Barracks in Honolulu in March 1925.
  • 1923
    In August 1923, Patton saved several children from drowning when they fell off a yacht during a boating trip off Salem, Massachusetts.
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  • 1922
    From 1922 to mid-1923 he attended the Field Officer's Course at the Cavalry School at Fort Riley, then he attended the Command and General Staff College from mid-1923 to mid-1924, graduating 25th out of 248.
  • 1921
    In July 1921 Patton became a member of the American Legion Tank Corps Post No. 19.
  • 1920
    On September 30, 1920 he relinquished command of the 304th Tank Brigade and was reassigned to Fort Myer as commander of 3rd Squadron, 3rd Cavalry.
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  • 1919
    While on duty in Washington, D.C., in 1919, Patton met Dwight D. Eisenhower, who would play an enormous role in Patton's future career.
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    Patton left France for New York City on March 2, 1919.
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  • 1918
    He returned to duty on October 28 but saw no further action before hostilities ended with the armistice of November 11, 1918.
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    In August 1918, he was placed in charge of the U.S. 1st Provisional Tank Brigade (re-designated the 304th Tank Brigade on November 6, 1918).
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    He was promoted to lieutenant colonel on April 3, 1918, and attended the Command and General Staff College in Langres.
    He received the first ten tanks on March 23, 1918 at the Tank School at Langres, Haute-Marne département.
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    Patton was promoted to major on January 26, 1918.
  • 1917
    On November 10, 1917 Patton was assigned to establish the AEF Light Tank School.
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    Patton was promoted to captain on May 15, 1917 and left for Europe, among the 180 men of Pershing's advance party which departed May 28 and arrived in Liverpool, England, on June 8.
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    He returned from the expedition permanently in February 1917.
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  • 1916
    Shortly after, he was promoted to first lieutenant while a part of the 10th Cavalry on May 23, 1916.
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    His initial combat experience came on May 14, 1916 in what would become the first motorized attack in the history of U.S. warfare.
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    In the meantime, Patton was selected to participate in the 1916 Summer Olympics, but that olympiad was cancelled due to World War I.
  • 1915
    He transferred to Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, for a brief time later in 1915.
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    In 1915 Patton was assigned to border patrol duty with A Company of the 8th Cavalry, based in Sierra Blanca.
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    Patton graduated from this school in June 1915.
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  • 1913
    Arriving in September 1913, he taught fencing to other cavalry officers, many of whom were senior to him in rank.
    He was temporarily assigned to the Office of the Army Chief of Staff, and in 1913, the first 20,000 of the Model 1913 Cavalry Saber—popularly known as the "Patton sword"—were ordered.
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  • 1912
    Following the 1912 Olympics, Patton traveled to Saumur, France, where he learned fencing techniques from Adjutant Charles Cléry, a French "master of arms" and instructor of fencing at the cavalry school there.
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    For his skill with running and fencing, Patton was selected as the Army's entry for the first modern pentathlon at the 1912 Olympic Games in Stockholm, Sweden.
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  • 1911
    In late 1911, Patton was transferred to Fort Myer, Virginia, where many of the Army's senior leaders were stationed.
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  • 1909
    He graduated from West Point on June 11, 1909 and was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the cavalry.
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  • 1904
    On March 3, 1904, after Patton continued letter-writing and good performance in the entrance exam, Bard recommended him for West Point.
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  • 1903
    He attended VMI from 1903 to 1904 and struggled with reading and writing but performed exceptionally in uniform and appearance inspection as well as military drill, earning the admiration of fellow cadets and the respect of upperclassmen.
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  • 1902
    During a family summer trip to Catalina Island in 1902, Patton met Beatrice Banning Ayer, the daughter of Boston industrialist Frederick Ayer. The two wed on May 26, 1910 in Beverly Farms, Massachusetts.
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  • 1885
    Patton was born on November 11, 1885, in San Gabriel, California, to George Smith Patton Sr. and his wife Ruth Wilson.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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