Hunter S. Thompson

American journalist and author Hunter S. Thompson

Hunter Stockton Thompson was an American author and journalist. Born in Louisville, Kentucky to a middle class family, Thompson went off the rails in his teens after the death of his father left the family in poverty. He was unable to formally finish high school as he was incarcerated for 60 days after abetting a robbery. He subsequently joined the United States Air Force before moving into journalism.
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Biography
Hunter S. Thompson's personal information overview.
Birthday
18 July 1937

Relationships

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News
News about Hunter S. Thompson from around the web
Hunter S. Thompson's 9/11 Essay Is Still Chillingly Accurate 16 Years Later
Yahoo News - 5 months
When terrorists attacked the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on Sept. 11, 2001, no one knew exactly what the future would hold.
Article Link:
 Yahoo News article
Hunter S. Thompson's Widow Opens Doors To His 'War Room'
NPR - 6 months
Years after his death, gonzo journalist Hunter S. Thompson's legend lives on. His widow takes Aspen Public Radio's Claire Woodcock on a visit to The War Room in his home, where Thompson spent 16 hours a day locked in, writing such pieces as Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.
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 NPR article
Among Trump voters, is there a tipping point?
Yahoo News - 7 months
With his rainbow-tinted aviator glasses, Vietnam-era jungle hat, and American flag sleeveless shirt, Tony Carraway comes across as a patriot the way Hunter S. Thompson did: on his own terms, without apology. A reservist pilot in Conyers, Ga., who flies twin-props in support of domestic Army maneuvers, he turned to President Trump after watching what he saw as years of Democrats starving the military of funding. Recommended: How much do you know about Texas?
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 Yahoo News article
Fear & Loafing at the IMATS
Huffington Post - 10 months
function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); “You will be the same person in five years as you are today except for the people you meet and the books you read.” - Charlie “Tremendous” Jones This quote has made enough rounds on the internet - unattributed and bastardized in motivational memes - to be in the public domain by now. And if that’s not how copyright law works, so what? Why should we honor Charlie Jones’ “intellectual property” when the man doesn’t even have a Wikipedia page? Sure, his book...
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 Huffington Post article
A Couple Of Things About Jimmy Breslin
Huffington Post - 11 months
Last Wednesday, I sat down to write a piece about the late Jimmy Breslin, the newspaper columnist whose blunt yet eloquent and crafted prose captured New York and its environs as no one has since Damon Runyon. Jimmy died a little more than a week ago and I wanted to say a few words to note ― as so many others have — how he was an inspiration to anyone who on a regular basis has to put some thoughts together in a column for publication, often straining until tiny beads of blood pop out on their foreheads. But there were distractions. As I started to write, news came from London of the lone wolf terrorist who barreled his SUV into pedestrians on Westminster Bridge, then dashed to Parliament and stabbed to death a policeman. Five died, including the attacker, and more than 50 were injured. Then there was California Republican Devin Nunes, chair of the House Intelligence Committee, dashing to the White House to give to Donald Trump new info he’d received, allegedly on the surve...
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 Huffington Post article
Hollywood Screen And TV Writers Call For Strike Vote
Huffington Post - 11 months
On March 24, after two weeks of frustrating contract talks, negotiators for the WGA (Writers Guild of America) notified the AMPTP (Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers) that, because the talks were stalled, they had no choice but to ask their 12,000 members to give them strike authorization. It was a bold move. As sparklingly glamorous and self-absorbed as Hollywood’s entertainment business is, when it comes to contract negotiations between the AMPTP and the WGA (or the DGA or SAG-AFTRA), they’re depressingly similar to those between, say, a group of pipe-fitters and welders and the IAM (International Association of Machinists). The issue is money, plain and simple. Money in the form of money, money in the form of benefits, money in the form of staking a claim to new technology. Accordingly, as in any contract negotiation, logic, honesty, fairness, and generosity will play no part. It all centers around muscle. Think of being hit with Hunter Thompson’s “million-...
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 Huffington Post article
From Zombies To Reality: Chatting With Andrew McMahon, Ian Hunter And Son Volt's Jay Farrar, Plus BoDeans' 'My Hometown' Exclusive
Huffington Post - 12 months
A Conversation with Andrew McMahon Mike Ragogna: Andrew, your new album Zombies On Broadway seems like it could be converted into something more than just your second Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness project. Was that your evil scheme? Andrew McMahon: You know, it's always kind of my evil scheme, truthfully. I've always loved records that seemed to have a theme or some sort of overarching concept. Of course, I didn't go full crazy-concept record but I wanted there to be a feeling that these songs were sourced from a similar space and told a larger story once you put them all together. MR: I especially love your concept of finding your way back to the city to settle a score with an “old ghost.” And that sometimes, you can go home again. AM: It wasn't the plan, but I tend to find that “plans” are meant to be redirected and they can shift on a dime. New York brings out some of the best and worst things in me. I think that's probably why I was so attracted to bringing the cr...
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 Huffington Post article
Gary Cartwright, Acclaimed Texas Writer, Dies at 82
NYTimes - 12 months
Mr. Cartwright practiced the “gonzo journalism” made famous by another larger-than-life storyteller: Hunter S. Thompson.
Article Link:
 NYTimes article
7 Tips To Help You Tell Real News From Fake
Huffington Post - about 1 year
I’ve been hearing a lot lately from people who feel overwhelmed by all the drastically different news narratives fighting for their attention — especially, of course, the ones about Donald Trump. Real news? Fake news? How do you tell the difference? Here’s a seven-point checklist of the most essential things to know. 1. Be skeptical. There’s an old saying in journalism: “If your mother says she loves you, check it out.” Reporters are supposed to look hard at what they think they know, and so should their audience. Reputable news outlets “show their work,” so you can see how they came to their conclusions. Are the sources solid? Does the logic makes sense? (More on this below.) 2. If the story is sensational, be more skeptical. Amazing things are amazing for a reason: they don’t happen very often. There are a lot more amazing stories in the world — because they make money — than there are amazing things that actually happened. This is why serious news sources tend to be l...
Article Link:
 Huffington Post article
25 Quotes About Appreciation in Relation to Self and Others
Huffington Post - about 1 year
Appreciation is an important, that is often taken for granted. We all want to be appreciated, but are we also expressing our appreciation in return? This is such an important part of our relationships with others, and in both them and ourselves knowing what they mean to us, or we mean to them. Here are some quotes to motivate you to either express your appreciation for others, or to identify what we have been lacking in hearing . 1. "Dwell on the beauty of life. Watch the stars, and see yourself running with them." ― Marcus Aurelius, Meditations 2. "I wonder if the snow loves the trees and fields, that it kisses them so gently? And then it covers them up snug, you know, with a white quilt; and perhaps it says, "Go to sleep, darlings, till the summer comes gain." ― Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass 3. "Be thankful for what you have; you'll end up having more. If you concentrate on what you don't have, you will never, ever have enou...
Article Link:
 Huffington Post article
Get High Just Like Hunter S. Thompson Did With His Zombie Pot
Huffington Post - about 1 year
For the many who idolize Hunter S. Thompson, pioneering creator of Gonzo journalism and author of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, following in his footsteps looks pretty daunting ― until now. Thompson’s drug-fueled, immersive approach to his art sets a high barrier to entry, but to spend a day in this New Journalist’s shoes, acolytes will soon be able to skip recreating experiences like embedding with a violent biker gang. That’s because his widow, Anita Thompson, recently announced that she’ll be marketing “authentic Gonzo strains” from Hunter’s “personal” marijuana stash. Yep, one day we may all be able to get exactly as high as Thompson did.  In a Facebook post, Thompson revealed that she has preserved several kinds of her late husband’s pot, and that she’ll be using DNA extracted from the leaves to reanimate the exact strains he smoked. The pot project comes as an offshoot of a recent business deal struck between Anita Thompson and the Gonz...
Article Link:
 Huffington Post article
Hemingway home gets back antlers taken by Hunter S. Thompson
Yahoo News - over 1 year
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — A young Hunter S. Thompson went to Idaho to write about Ernest Hemingway and decided to take a piece of his hero home with him — a set of trophy elk antlers.
Article Link:
 Yahoo News article
Luke Burbank on coming clean
NPR - over 1 year
Public radio veteran Luke Burbank is the first to admit he isn't a big reader. But he's taken a cue from Hunter S. Thompson.
Article Link:
 NPR article
How to Travel the World While Working a Full-Time Job
Huffington Post - about 2 years
Because I work full time, people often wonder how I travel as much as I do while holding down a job that is neither travel-related, nor requires much, if any, traveling. Some assume I am paid to travel, or endorse travel-related products and services. Neither is true. So how do I do it? Seeing the whole world has always been a priority for me, so I designed my life from an early age to ensure I have the freedom to travel often. Everything from my lifestyle choices and approach to personal finance, to the career paths I've pursued has all been informed by my desire to travel. But shy of building -- or reengineering -- your entire life around travel, there are smaller steps you can take to help squeeze more travel out of your life. Not all jobs are the same, and what works for some may not work for others. But generally speaking, depending on the type of job you have, and personal and familial circumstances, try the following tips. They have at one time or another worked for m...
Article Link:
 Huffington Post article
The 5 Most Beautiful Towns in America
Huffington Post - about 2 years
by Laura Vogel, Condé Nast Traveler Getty Whether they have over-the-top American charm (we're looking at you, Woodstock, Vermont) or proximity to some of the loveliest landscapes on earth (hello, Big Sur), these towns are worth a stopover. And, since they are all on the smaller side--all are home to fewer than 130,000 people, and most far less--you can experience their culture and beauty like a local. 1. Woodstock, Vermont For a dose of absurdly quaint New England charm, it's tough to do better than this town in the Green Mountains. Complete with a perfect village green with a white steepled church, this is just the destination for antique shoppers and B&B fans--some lodging even dates back to the 1750s. Almost all of the town's buildings are on the National Register of Historic Places; be sure to drop in at the 1886-era general store F.H. Gillingham & Sons for some souvenir maple candy. Alamy 2. St. Augustine, Florida You'll quickly forget the Florida...
Article Link:
 Huffington Post article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Hunter S. Thompson
    LATE ADULTHOOD
  • 2005
    Age 67
    The Colorado Supreme Court eventually overturned Auman's sentence in March 2005, shortly after Thompson's death, and Auman is now free.
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    On August 20, 2005, in a private funeral, Thompson's ashes were fired from a cannon.
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  • 2004
    Age 66
    In 2004, Thompson wrote: "Nixon was a professional politician, and I despised everything he stood for—but if he were running for president this year against the evil Bush–Cheney gang, I would happily vote for him."
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  • 2003
    Age 65
    Released in 2003, it was perceived by critics to be an angry, vitriolic commentary on the passing of the American Century, and the state of affairs after the September 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.
    Thompson married assistant Anita Bejmuk on April 23, 2003.
  • 2000
    Age 62
    Fear and Loathing in America was published in 2000 and contains letters dating from 1968 to 1976.
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    Thompson completed his journalism career in the same way it had begun: writing about sports. From 2000 until his death in 2005, Thompson penned a weekly column called "Hey, Rube" for ESPN.com's "Page 2".
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    In July 2000, Thompson accidentally shot his assistant, Deborah Fuller, while attempting to scare a bear away from her lodging on The Owl Farm.
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  • 1998
    Age 60
    Thompson's work was popularized again with the 1998 release of the film Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, which opened to considerable fanfare.
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  • FIFTIES
  • 1996
    Age 58
    Thompson was named a Kentucky Colonel by the Governor of Kentucky in a December 1996 tribute ceremony where he also received keys to the city of Louisville.
  • 1994
    Age 56
    In 1994, the magazine published "He Was a Crook," Thompson's "scathing" obituary of Richard Nixon.
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  • 1992
    Age 54
    Rather than embarking on the campaign trail as he had done in previous presidential elections, Thompson monitored the proceedings from cable television; Better Than Sex: Confessions of a Political Junkie, his account of the 1992 presidential election campaign, is composed of reactionary faxes sent to Rolling Stone.
  • 1990
    Age 52
    In 1990, former porn director Gail Palmer visited Thompson's home in Woody Creek.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1985
    Age 47
    As part of his research, in the spring of 1985 he spent evenings at the Mitchell Brothers O'Farrell Theater striptease club in San Francisco and his experience there eventually evolved into a full-length novel tentatively titled The Night Manager.
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  • 1983
    Age 45
    In 1983, he covered the U.S. invasion of Grenada but would not discuss these experiences until the publication of Kingdom of Fear 20 years later.
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  • 1981
    Age 43
    On July 21, 1981, in Aspen, Colorado, Thompson was pulled over at 2am for running a stop sign, and began to "rave" at a state trooper.
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  • 1980
    Age 42
    In addition to his divorce from Sandra Conklin, 1980 marked the release of Where the Buffalo Roam, a loose film adaptation of situations from Thompson's early 1970s work, with Bill Murray starring as the author.
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    Perhaps in response to this, as well as the strained relationship with Rolling Stone, and the failure of his marriage, Thompson became more reclusive after 1980.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1976
    Age 38
    Thompson was to provide Rolling Stone with coverage for the 1976 presidential campaign that would appear in a book published by the magazine.
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  • 1974
    Age 36
    According to Jann Wenner, co-founder and publisher of Rolling Stone, Thompson's journalistic work began to seriously suffer after his trip to Africa to cover "The Rumble in the Jungle"—the world heavyweight boxing match between George Foreman and Muhammad Ali—in 1974.
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    Following Nixon's pardon by Gerald Ford in 1974, Hunter ruminated on the approximately $400,000 pension Nixon maneuvered his way into, by resigning before being formally indicted.
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  • 1972
    Age 34
    The film Where the Buffalo Roam (1980) depicts heavily fictionalized attempts by Thompson to cover the Super Bowl and the 1972 U.S. presidential election.
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  • 1971
    Age 33
    Beginning in late 1971 Thompson wrote extensively for Rolling Stone on election campaigns of President Richard Nixon and his unsuccessful opponent, Senator George McGovern.
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  • 1970
    Age 32
    The book for which Thompson gained most of his fame had its genesis during the research for Strange Rumblings in Aztlan, an exposé for Rolling Stone on the 1970 killing of the Mexican-American television journalist Rubén Salazar.
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    In 1970, Cardoso (who was then the editor of The Boston Globe Sunday Magazine) wrote to Thompson praising the Kentucky Derby piece as a breakthrough: "This is it, this is pure Gonzo.
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    Also in 1970, Thompson wrote an article entitled The Kentucky Derby Is Decadent and Depraved for the short-lived new journalism magazine Scanlan's Monthly.
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    In 1970, Thompson ran for sheriff of Pitkin County, Colorado, as part of a group of citizens running for local offices on the "Freak Power" ticket.
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  • 1968
    Age 30
    He also signed a deal with Ballantine Books in 1968 to write a satirical book called The Johnson File about Lyndon B. Johnson.
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    He used a $6,000 advance from Random House to travel on the 1968 Presidential campaign trail and attend the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago for research purposes.
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    In early 1968, Thompson signed the "Writers and Editors War Tax Protest" pledge, vowing to refuse tax payments in protest against the Vietnam War.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1967
    Age 29
    By late 1967, Thompson and his family moved back to Colorado and rented a house in Woody Creek, a small mountain hamlet outside Aspen.
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  • 1965
    Age 27
    The article appeared on May 17, 1965, and after that Thompson received several book offers and spent the next year living and riding with the club.
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    In 1965 Carey McWilliams, editor of The Nation, hired Thompson to write a story about the California-based Hells Angels motorcycle club.
    Thompson severed his ties with the Observer after his editor refused to print his review of Tom Wolfe's 1965 essay collection The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby, and moved to San Francisco.
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  • 1964
    Age 26
    One story told of his 1964 visit to Ketchum, Idaho, to investigate the reasons for Ernest Hemingway's suicide.
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    In 1964 the family relocated to Glen Ellen, California, where Thompson continued to write for the National Observer on an array of domestic subjects.
  • 1963
    Age 25
    They married on May 19, 1963, shortly after returning to the United States, and lived briefly in Aspen, Colorado, where they had a son, Juan Fitzgerald Thompson (born March 23, 1964). The couple conceived five more times, but three pregnancies were miscarried, and the other two produced infants who died shortly after birth. Hunter and Sandy divorced in 1980 but always remained close friends.
  • 1962
    Age 24
    From May 1962 to May 1963, Thompson traveled to South America as a correspondent for a Dow Jones-owned weekly newspaper, the National Observer.
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  • 1960
    Age 22
    In 1960, Thompson moved to San Juan, Puerto Rico, to take a job with the sporting magazine El Sportivo, which folded soon after his arrival.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1957
    Age 19
    Thompson was discharged from the Air Force in November 1957 as an Airman First Class, having been recommended for an early honorable discharge by his commanding officer. "In summary, this airman, although talented, will not be guided by policy", Col. William S. Evans, chief of information services wrote to the Eglin personnel office. "Sometimes his rebel and superior attitude seems to rub off on other airmen staff members."
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    In early 1957 he wrote a sports column for The Playground News, a local newspaper in Fort Walton Beach, Florida.
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  • 1956
    Age 18
    In 1956 he transferred to Eglin Air Force Base near Fort Walton Beach, Florida.
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  • 1955
    Age 17
    As an Athenaeum member, Thompson contributed articles to and helped produce the club's yearbook The Spectator. The group ejected Thompson in 1955, citing his legal problems.
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  • 1952
    Age 14
    Also in 1952, he was accepted as a member of the Athenaeum Literary Association, a school-sponsored literary and social club that dated to 1862.
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    Thompson attended I. N. Bloom Elementary School, Highland Middle School, and Atherton High School, before transferring to Louisville Male High School in September 1952.
    On July 3, 1952, when Thompson was 14 years old, his father, aged 58, died of myasthenia gravis.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1943
    Age 5
    On December 2, 1943, when Thompson was six years old, the family settled at 2437 Ransdell Avenue in the affluent Cherokee Triangle neighborhood of The Highlands.
  • 1937
    Born
    Born on July 18, 1937.
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