Jimmy Doolittle

United States Air Force Medal of Honor recipient Jimmy Doolittle

General/Doctor James Harold "Jimmy" Doolittle, USAF was an American aviation pioneer. Doolittle served as an officer in the United States Army Air Forces during the Second World War. He earned the Medal of Honor for his valor and leadership as commander of the Doolittle Raid while a lieutenant colonel.
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Of War and Life: Ventura's Hal Wilder found love and then a World War II ... - Ventura County Star
Google News - over 6 years
Jimmy Doolittle, and Medal of Honor recipient Eddie Rickenbacker, whom Wilder affectionately called "Uncle Rick." The men were regular dinner guests at the Wilder home. "As a child, I was required to sit at the dinner table until everyone was ready to
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New Page Field terminal complex dedicated in Fort Myers - The News-Press
Google News - over 6 years
Jimmy Doolittle and his crew first practiced stripping B-25s to lighten their load and increase their flight range. And, after months of secret training, on April 18, 1942, Doolittle led a squadron of B-52s from the deck of the USS Hornet on the first
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LT. COL. CHARLES S. HUDSON, RET. - Midway Driller
Google News - over 6 years
Jimmy Doolittle Charlie was awarded the Air Medal with two clusters. He was also awarded by the French government it's prestigious Croix de Guerre medal. He also received four Presidential Unit Citations, and the European theater ribbon with six battle
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Schilt: a Marine, Cherry Point pioneer - ENC Today
Google News - over 6 years
"He actually rubbed elbows with Jimmy Doolittle, who is considered one of the finest military aviators of that era, and Schilt was right up there with him," Hart said. "They both flew in several competitions. As a matter of fact, Doolittle won the
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Old photos, map set for Village Hall walls - Chagrin Valley Publishing
Google News - over 6 years
Other pilots at the event included Frank Hawkes, Eddie Rickenbacker, Francis J. Rowe and Jimmy Doolittle. There were flying and stunt demonstrations for the dedication. The newspaper referred to the airport as being in Chagrin Falls and in Cuyahoga
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Tea Party values will help fix US credit rating - Oneonta Daily Star
Google News - over 6 years
Jimmy Doolittle said on the eve of the Tokyo raid, "Nothing is stronger than the heart of a volunteer." But, is the downgrade our fault? Of course, it is! We called attention to the runaway spending, corruption and wealth transfer
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US Military: Protectors of the Selfish Class? - Big Government
Google News - over 6 years
Honoring men like Jimmy Doolittle or naming streets and highways after war heroes, living or dead, seems like a quaint relic from a long-forgotten era. Within days of the Chinook tragedy, Britain was set ablaze by barbaric rioters and looters
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Forty-Seven Years in Aviation -- A Memoir: Chapter 4 -- Primary Flight ... - AVweb
Google News - over 6 years
When we got back Don admitted it was a close call; if nothing else, he found out how much altitude a T-6 requires for a split-S. Instrument training for Air Force student pilots in 1955 hadn't moved very far beyond Jimmy Doolittle's pioneering work in
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Aviation Club Secures a Home on Park Avenue, in a Space With Significance
NYTimes - over 6 years
In the 1950s, when commercial aviation was growing and space travel captured the American imagination, the Wings Club of New York settled into a first-class home. Over the next several decades, it was a congenial gathering spot for aviators, celebrities and even presidents. Candles glowed on birthday cakes sometimes delivered by beautiful flight
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A simple aviation camp helped S.A. land the role of 'Military City' - San Antonio Express
Google News - over 6 years
Jimmy Doolittle (second row, standing, third from left) and Kelly personnel, who helped prepare his plane for his 1922 coast-to-coast flight. Photo: USA/Kelly AFB / Bk: A Heritage of Service... "Kelly Katies" doing desealing work in
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A 95th birthday party for a hero - Cincinnati.com
Google News - over 6 years
Jimmy Doolittle's co-pilot. Griffin and Cole shook their heads at the word "hero." They waved their hands as if to keep the sound of the word out. "Not us," Griffin said. "We toasted the heroes earlier." The six-course, three-hour feast - filled with
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How about a WW II topic: Italy 1936. Choose a dofferent way in the air. - Strategy Page
Google News - over 6 years
He actually outperformed the German and British idiots in theater, and that with rotten equipment, until Jimmy Doolittle arrived and showed the Allies in North Africa how it was supposed to be done., Not exactly correct, The Richelieus were pieces of
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WWII plane on display at Airport Bash - Moberly Monitor Index
Google News - over 6 years
Jimmy Doolittle took off from the USS Hornet in the Western Pacific Ocean and bombed the Japanese mainland. The attack boosted American morale and alarmed the Japanese, who had believed their home islands couldn't be touched by the Allies
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Sunrise, sunset Carolina style - The State
Google News - over 6 years
MIC SMITH /ASSOCIATED PRESS During the summer, thousands of purple martins roost on Jimmy Doolittle Island, also known as Bomb Island. At sunset, the martins return to their roost. July and August are the prime months for viewing the birds
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Hap Arnold - Nothing is impossible - Sonoma Index-Tribune
Google News - over 6 years
When famous folks, including Jimmy Doolittle, Lowell Thomas, George Marshall and many others visited Hap Arnold, he would take them to meet his Sonoma friends in these and other local landmarks. Along the way, Hap and Bee Arnold had four children: Lois
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American History: The War in the Pacific - Voice of America
Google News - over 6 years
General Jimmy Doolittle led a group of sixteen American B-25 bombers that took off from the aircraft carrier Hornet and bombed Tokyo in a surprise raid. JIMMY DOOLITTLE: "The B-25 was selected because it was small, because it had the sufficient range
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Aviation buff calls Richfield home - Salisbury Post
Google News - over 6 years
... II flying ace and pilot of the Memphis Belle; Chuck Yeager, who broke the sound barrier; Scott Crossfield, the test pilot who flew twice the speed of sound; and James H. “Jimmy” Doolittle, famous for leading the B-25 bombing raid on Tokyo in 1942
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WWII Vet Celebrates 90th birthday - WALA-TV FOX10
Google News - over 6 years
“April 18th, in Alameda, Calif., we took aboard Jimmy Doolittle and 16 ArmyAB-25s. We got underway towards Japan. A few hundred miles from Japan, we launched the B-25s, they bombed Tokyo,” Tolin said. Tolin was onboard the USS Hornet, which was sunk
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Jimmy Doolittle
    TWENTIES
  • 1993
    James H. "Jimmy" Doolittle died at the age of 96 in Pebble Beach, California on September 27, 1993, and is buried at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia, near Washington, D.C., next to his wife.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1989
    He was inducted in the Motorsports Hall of Fame of America as the only member of the air racing category in the inaugural class of 1989, and into the Aerospace Walk of Honor in the inaugural class of 1990.
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  • 1983
    In 1983, he was awarded the United States Military Academy's Sylvanus Thayer Award.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1972
    In 1972, Doolittle received the Tony Jannus Award for his distinguished contributions to commercial aviation, in recognition of the development of instrument flight.
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  • OTHER
  • 1959
    Doolittle retired from Air Force Reserve duty on February 28, 1959.
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  • 1958
    He committed suicide at the age of thirty-eight in 1958.
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  • 1957
    From 1957 to 1958, he was chairman of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA).
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  • 1954
    In 1954, President Dwight D. Eisenhower asked Doolittle to perform a study of the Central Intelligence Agency; The resulting work was known as the Doolittle Report, 1954, and was classified for a number of years. In January 1956, Dwight Eisenhower asked Doolittle to serve as a member on the first edition of the President's Board of Consultants on Foreign Intelligence Activities which, years later, would become known as the President's Intelligence Advisory Board.
  • 1951
    In March 1951, Doolittle was appointed a special assistant to the Chief of Staff of the Air Force, serving as a civilian in scientific matters which led to Air Force ballistic missile and space programs. In 1952, following a string of three air crashes in two months at Elizabeth, New Jersey, the President of the United States, Harry S. Truman, appointed him to lead a presidential commission examining the safety of urban airports.
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  • 1948
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1948, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major General (Air Corps) James Harold Doolittle (ASN: 0-271855), United States Army Air Forces, for gallantry in action.
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  • 1947
    In 1947, Doolittle also became the first president of the Air Force Association, an organization which he helped create.
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    On 18 September 1947, his reserve commission as a general officer was transferred to the newly established United States Air Force.
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  • 1946
    However, the 8th was not scheduled to be at full strength until February 1946 and Doolittle declined to rush 8th Air Force units into combat saying that "If the war is over, I will not risk one airplane nor a single bomber crew member just to be able to say the 8th Air Force had operated against the Japanese in the Pacific". On 27 March 1946, Doolittle was requested by Secretary of War Robert P. Patterson to head a commission on the relationships between officers and enlisted men in the US Army.
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    In the summer of 1946, Doolittle went to Stockholm where he was consulted about the "ghost rockets" that had been observed over Scandinavia.
    He retired from the United States Army on 10 May 1946.
    On 5 January 1946, Doolittle reverted to inactive reserve status in the Army Air Forces in the grade of Lieutenant General, a rarity in those days when nearly all other reserve officers were limited to the rank of major general or rear admiral, a restriction that would not end in the US armed forces until the 21st century.
  • 1943
    Doolittle's major influence on the European air war occurred early in the year when he changed the policy requiring escorting fighters to remain with the bombers at all times - this was partly due to help from the British Royal Navy's best test pilot, Eric Brown flight-testing all three major American fighter designs (P-38, P-47 and the then-new, Packard Merlin-powered P-51B) being used for such escort duties, along with at least two other pilots (Sqn Ldr James "Jimmy" Nelson and Sqn Ldr Douglas Weightman) from the RAE's Aerodynamics Flight test unit late in 1943 and into the initial months of 1944.
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    Maj Gen Doolittle took command of the Fifteenth Air Force in the Mediterranean Theater of Operations in November 1943.
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  • 1942
    He was promoted to Major General in November 1942, and in March 1943 became commanding general of the Northwest African Strategic Air Force, a unified command of U.S. Army Air Force and Royal Air Force units.
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    In July 1942, as a Brigadier General – he had been promoted by two grades on the day after the Tokyo attack, by-passing the rank of full Colonel – Doolittle was assigned to the nascent Eighth Air Force.
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  • 1941
    Following the reorganization of the Army Air Corps into the USAAF in June 1941, Doolittle was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel on January 2, 1942, and assigned to Army Air Forces Headquarters to plan the first retaliatory air raid on the Japanese homeland.
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  • 1940
    Doolittle returned to active duty in the U.S. Army Air Corps on July 1, 1940 with rank of Major.
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    In 1940, he became president of the Institute of Aeronautical Science.
  • 1934
    In April 1934, Doolittle was selected to be a member of the Baker Board.
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  • 1930
    Doolittle resigned his regular commission on February 15, 1930, and was commissioned a Major in the Air Reserve Corps a month later, being named manager of the Aviation Department of Shell Oil Company, in which capacity he conducted numerous aviation tests.
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    In January 1930, he advised the Army on the construction of Floyd Bennett Field in New York City.
  • 1929
    In 1929, he became the first pilot to take off, fly and land an airplane using instruments alone, without a view outside the cockpit.
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  • 1927
    During this time, in 1927 he was the first to perform an outside loop previously thought to be a fatal maneuver.
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    He returned to the United States, and was confined to Walter Reed Army Hospital for his injuries until April 1927.
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  • 1926
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting a Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Third Distinguished Flying Cross to Colonel (Air Corps) James Harold Doolittle (ASN: 0-271855), United States Army Air Forces, for extraordinary achievement as Pilot of a B-25 Bomber and Commanding Officer of the 1st Special Aviation Project (Doolittle Raider Force), while participating in a highly destructive raid on the Japanese mainland on 18 April 1942.
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    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Distinguished Flying Cross to First Lieutenant (Air Service) James Harold Doolittle (ASN: 0-271855), U.S. Army Air Corps, for extraordinary achievement while participating in an aerial flight. During March 1924, at McCook Field, Dayton, Ohio, Lieutenant Doolittle, piloting a Fokker PW-7 pursuit airplane, performed a series of acceleration tests requiring skill, initiative, endurance, and courage of the highest type.
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    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Flying Cross to First Lieutenant (Air Service) James Harold Doolittle (ASN: 0-271855), U.S. Army Air Corps, for extraordinary achievement while participating in an aerial flight.
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  • 1925
    He won the Schneider Cup race in a Curtiss R3C in 1925 with an average speed of 232 MPH.
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    Because the Army had given him two years to get his degree and he had done it in just one, he immediately started working on his Sc.D. in Aeronautics, which he received in June 1925.
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  • 1924
    He received his M.S. in Aeronautics from MIT in June 1924.
    In March 1924, he conducted aircraft acceleration tests at McCook Field, which became the basis of his master's thesis and led to his second Distinguished Flying Cross.
  • 1922
    Doolittle was one of the most famous pilots during the inter-war period. In September 1922, he made the first of many pioneering flights, flying a de Havilland DH-4 – which was equipped with early navigational instruments – in the first cross-country flight, from Pablo Beach (now Jacksonville Beach), Florida, to Rockwell Field, San Diego, California, in 21 hours and 19 minutes, making only one refueling stop at Kelly Field.
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    Subsequently, he attended the Air Service Mechanical School at Kelly Field and the Aeronautical Engineering Course at McCook Field, Ohio. Having at last returned to complete his college degree, he earned the Bachelor of Arts from the University of California, Berkeley in 1922, and joined the Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity.
  • 1921
    On May 10, 1921, he was engineering officer and pilot for an expedition recovering a plane that had force-landed in a Mexican canyon on February 10 during a transcontinental flight attempt by Lieut.
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  • 1920
    Recommended by three officers for retention in the Air Service during demobilization at the end of the war, Doolittle qualified by examination and received a Regular Army commission as a 1st Lieutenant, Air Service, on July 1, 1920.
  • 1918
    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Army Distinguished Service Medal to Major General James Harold Doolittle (ASN: 0-271855), United States Army Air Forces, for exceptionally meritorious and distinguished services to the Government of the United States, in a duty of great responsibility as Commander of the Northwest African Strategic Air Force since its organization.
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    Doolittle received his Reserve Military Aviator rating and was commissioned a first lieutenant in the Signal Officers Reserve Corps of the U.S. Army on March 11, 1918.
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  • 1917
    Doolittle married Josephine "Joe" E. Daniels on December 24, 1917.
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    Doolittle took a leave of absence in October 1917 to enlist in the Signal Corps Reserve as a flying cadet; he ground trained at the School of Military Aeronautics (an Army school) on the campus of the University of California, and flight-trained at Rockwell Field, California.
  • 1910
    When his school attended the 1910 Los Angeles International Air Meet at Dominguez Field Doolittle saw his first airplane.
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  • 1896
    Born on December 14, 1896.
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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