Joe Louis

American boxer Joe Louis

Joseph Louis Barrow, better known as Joe Louis, was an American professional boxer and the World Heavyweight Champion from 1937 to 1949. He is considered to be one of the greatest heavyweights of all time. Nicknamed the Brown Bomber, Louis helped elevate boxing from a nadir in popularity in the post-Jack Dempsey era by establishing a reputation as an honest, hardworking fighter at a time when the sport was dominated by gambling interests.
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Today in sports history - Hamilton Spectator
Google News - over 6 years
1937: Joe Louis beat Tommy Farr in 15 rounds for the heavyweight boxing title. 1939: New York Yankees' Atley Donald pitched a baseball a record 94.7 miles per hour. 1941: St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Lon Warneke no-hit the Cincinnati Reds, 2-0
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Nicklas Lidstrom likes Red Wings' additions on defense - The Detroit News
Google News - over 6 years
The Wings will be a blend of the old and the new, in the coming season, which begins Friday, Oct. 7, at Joe Louis Arena against the Ottawa Senators. Three long time regulars retired — Kris Draper, Chris Osgood and Brian Rafalski
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Will Floyd Mayweather's age catch up with his perfection in ring vs. Victor Ortiz? - MLive.com
Google News - over 6 years
The sight of Joe Louis' head dangling off the ring apron, right leg draped over the bottom rope, after his career-ending confrontation with Rocky Marciano, still ranks among the great cautionary tales for fighters who cling too long to the rapture of
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Red Wings captain Nicklas Lidstrom / JULIAN H. GONZALEZ/DFP - Detroit Free Press
Google News - over 6 years
10 at Joe Louis Arena. Activities will run from 11 am to 6 pm, with autograph sessions, photo opportunities and tours of the locker room. There also will be question-and-answer sessions with players, staff and alumni, and a memorabilia exhibition
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Baseball roundup: Cattle Baron's Ball fund-raiser coming back to Detroit - Detroit Free Press
Google News - over 6 years
Kid Rock will perform at the Cattle Baron's Ball, which will be held on Oct. 29 at Joe Louis Arena. BY CHRISSIE THOMPSON General Motors Chief Marketing Officer Joel Ewanick is bringing the Cattle Baron's Ball fund-raiser back to Detroit -- complete
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Chris Brown Brings The F.A.M.E. Tour to Joe Louis Arena 9/18 - Broadway World
Google News - over 6 years
Chris Brown's "FAME" North American Tour comes to downtown Detroit's Joe Louis Arena on Sunday, September 18 at 7 pm Chris' fourth studio album, FAME, continues to produce chart-topping songs spawning three consecutive #1 singles ("Look At Me Now,"
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Chris Brown, Kelly Rowland to stop at Joe Louis Arena on September 18 - MLive.com
Google News - over 6 years
By Aaron Foley | MLive.com Chris Brown announced North American tour dates for his "FAME" tour, which includes a September 18 stop at Joe Louis Arena in Detroit. Joining him will be Kelly Rowland, Tyga and T-Pain. Brown is touring support of his album
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Sowell: These stars unfortunately forgotten - Covington News
Google News - over 6 years
Three recent sports biographies, two about baseball stars Stan Musial and Hank Greenberg, and another about boxing great Joe Louis, are not only interesting in themselves, but also recall an era that now seems as irretrievably past as the Roman Empire
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Why Cy Young's Win Record Is the Most Unbreakable in All of Sports - Bleacher Report
Google News - over 6 years
Chamberlain's 50.4 ppg average or Joe Louis's 26-straight Heavyweight Title defenses. All of these are unbelievably impressive, but frankly none come close to Cy Young's 511 wins as a major league pitcher. No record in sports can match the scope of
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Man Charged With Throwing Octopus Has Charges Dropped - SB Nation (blog)
Google News - over 6 years
One of the fans who was fined and charged with disorderly conduct late last season for throwing an octopus on the ice at Joe Louis Arena had the charges against him dropped by the city of Detroit
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Forgotten Stars: Musial, Greenberg, Louis - The New American
Google News - over 6 years
Three recent sports biographies — two about baseball stars Stan Musial and Hank Greenberg, and another about boxing great Joe Louis — are not only interesting in themselves, but also recall an era that now seems as irretrievably past as the Roman
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In wake of Jeff Blashill's departure, WMU shares 'Why Western' campaign ... - MLive.com
Google News - over 6 years
By Graham Couch | Kalamazoo Gazette Kalamazoo Gazette fileWestern Michigan's hockey program beat Michigan 5-2 in the CCHA tournament semifinals last March at Joe Louis Arena. It was the signature win of Jeff Blashill's one-year tenure as head coach
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Big gospel concert coming to Joe Louis Arena - The Detroit News
Google News - over 6 years
Some of the biggest names in gospel music will appear at the Verizon How Sweet the Sound concert and competition, which hits Joe Louis Arena on Sept. 24, Olympia Entertainment announced Friday. Grammy-winning gospel singer CeCe Winans, a Detroit native
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Joe Louis
    TEENAGE
  • 1981
    Ronald Reagan waived the eligibility rules for burial at Arlington National Cemetery and Louis was buried there with full military honors on April 21, 1981.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1977
    He had surgery to correct an aortic aneurysm in 1977 and thereafter used an POV/scooter for a mobility aid.
  • 1971
    In a 1971 book, Brown Bomber, by Barney Nagler, Louis disclosed the truth about these incidents, stating that his collapse in 1969 had been caused by cocaine, and that his subsequent hospitalization had been prompted by his fear of a plot to destroy him.
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  • 1970
    In 1970, he spent five months at the Colorado Psychiatric Hospital and the Veterans Administration Hospital in Denver, hospitalized by his wife, Martha, and his son, Joe Louis Barrow Jr., for paranoia.
  • 1969
    Drugs took a toll on Louis in his later years. In 1969, he was hospitalized after collapsing on a New York City street.
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  • OTHER
  • 1959
    Louis's final marriage – to Martha Jefferson, a lawyer from Los Angeles, on St. Patrick's Day 1959 – lasted until his death.
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  • 1956
    He made his professional wrestling debut on March 16, 1956 in Washington, D.C., defeating Cowboy Rocky Lee.
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  • 1955
    On Christmas Day 1955, Louis married Rose Morgan, a successful Harlem businesswoman; their marriage was annulled in 1958.
  • 1953
    In 1953, when Louis's mother died, the IRS appropriated the $667 she had willed to Louis.
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  • 1952
    In 1952, Louis was invited to play as an amateur in the San Diego Open on a sponsor's exemption, becoming the first African American to play a PGA Tour event.
  • 1951
    After facing Marciano, with the prospect of another significant payday all but gone, Louis retired for good from professional boxing. He would, as before, continue to tour on the exhibition circuit, with his last contest taking place on December 16, 1951, in Taipei, Taiwan, against Corporal Buford J. deCordova.
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    After facing several club-level opponents, the International Boxing Club guaranteed Louis $300,000 to face undefeated heavyweight contender Rocky Marciano on October 26, 1951.
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  • 1950
    At the time of Louis's initial retirement, the IRS was still completing its investigation of his prior tax returns, which had always been handled by Mike Jacobs's personal accountant. In May 1950, the IRS finished a full audit of Louis's past returns and announced that, with interest and penalties, he owed the government more than $500,000.
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    After returning from retirement, Louis failed to regain the championship in 1950, and his career ended after he was knocked out by Rocky Marciano in 1951.
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  • 1949
    Louis would not defend his title again before announcing his retirement from boxing on March 1, 1949.
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  • 1948
    On June 25, 1948, about 42,000 people came to Yankee Stadium to see the aging champion, who weighed 213½, the heaviest of his career to date.
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  • 1947
    After trouble finding another suitable opponent, on December 5, 1947, Louis met Jersey Joe Walcott, a 33-year-old veteran with a 44–11–2 record.
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  • 1946
    Despite the financial pressure on Louis to resume boxing, his long-awaited rematch against Billy Conn had to be postponed to the summer of 1946, when weather conditions could accommodate a large outdoor audience.
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  • 1945
    Louis was eventually promoted to the rank of technical sergeant on April 9, 1945.
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    They divorced in March 1945 only to remarry a year later, but were again divorced in February 1949.
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  • 1942
    Louis's celebrity power was not, however, merely directed toward African Americans. In a famous wartime recruitment slogan, he echoed his prior comments of 1942: "We'll win, because we're on God's side."
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    Louis fought a charity bout for the Navy Relief Society against his former opponent Buddy Baer on January 9, 1942, which generated $47,000 for the fund.
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    The contest created an instant rivalry that Louis's career had lacked since the Schmeling era and a rematch with Conn was planned for late 1942.
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  • 1940
    In 1940 Louis endorsed and campaigned for Republican Wendell Willkie for president.
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  • 1939
    In the 29 months from January 1939 through May 1941, Louis defended his title thirteen times, a frequency unmatched by any Heavyweight Champion since the end of the bare-knuckle era.
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  • 1938
    On the night of June 22, 1938, Louis and Schmeling met for the second time in the boxing ring.
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    When Schmeling arrived in New York City in June 1938 for the rematch, he was accompanied by a Nazi party publicist who issued statements that a black man could not defeat Schmeling and that when Schmeling won, his prize money would be used to build tanks in Germany.
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  • 1937
    In all, Louis made 25 defenses of his Heavyweight title from 1937 to 1948, and was a world champion for 11 years and 10 months.
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    On August 30, 1937, after a postponement of four days due to rain, Louis and Farr finally touched gloves at New York's Yankee Stadium before a crowd of approximately 32,000.
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    Louis's manager Mike Jacobs attempted to arrange a rematch with Schmeling in 1937, but negotiations broke down when Schmeling demanded 30% of the gate.
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    The stage was set for Louis's title shot. On the night of the fight, June 22, 1937, Braddock was able to knock Louis down in round one, but afterward could accomplish little.
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    He tallied 52 knock outs and held the championship from 1937 to 1949, the longest span of any heavyweight titleholder.
    He held the world heavyweight championship from 1937 to 1949, and is considered to be one of the greatest heavyweights of all time.
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  • 1936
    Each of the parties involved worked to facilitate the controversial Braddock-Louis matchup. Louis did his part by knocking out former champion Jack Sharkey on August 18, 1936.
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    Conversely, Schmeling prepared intently for the bout. Schmeling had thoroughly studied Louis's style and believed he had found a weakness. By exploiting Louis's habit of dropping his left hand low after a jab, Schmeling handed Louis his first professional loss by knocking him out in Round 12 at Yankee Stadium on June 19, 1936.
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  • 1935
    By this time, Louis was ranked as the No. 1 contender in the heavyweight division and had won the Associated Press' "Athlete of the Year" award for 1935. What was considered to be a final tune-up bout before an eventual title shot was scheduled for June 1936 against former World Heavyweight Champion Max Schmeling.
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    In September 1935, on the eve of Louis' fight with the former title holder Max Baer, Washington Post sportswriter Shirley Povich wrote about some Americans' hopes for the white contender; "They say Baer will surpass himself in the knowledge that he is the lone white hope for the defense of Nordic superiority in the prize ring."
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    Likewise, biographer Bill Libby asserted that "The sports world was hungry for a great champion when Louis arrived in New York in 1935."
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    With the backing of major promotion, Louis fought thirteen times in 1935.
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    The contract, however, did not keep Roxborough and Black from attempting to cash in as Louis' managers; when Louis turned 21 on May 13, 1935, Roxborough and Black each signed Louis to an onerous long-term contract that collectively dedicated half of Louis' future income to the pair.
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    After Louis' narrow defeat of Natie Brown on March 29, 1935, Jacobs and the Louis team met at the Frog Club, a black nightclub, and negotiated a three-year exclusive boxing promotion deal.
    If Louis were to rise to national prominence among such cultural attitudes, a change in management would be necessary. In 1935, boxing promoter Mike Jacobs sought out Louis' handlers.
    Trotter later became Louis's first wife in 1935.
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  • 1934
    In September 1934, while promoting a Detroit-area "coming home" bout for Louis against Canadian Alex Borchuk, Roxborough was pressured by members of the Michigan State Boxing Commission to have Louis sign with white management.
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    Louis' initial professional fights were all located in the Chicago area, his professional debut coming on July 4, 1934 against Jack Kracken in the Bacon Casino on Chicago's south side.
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    In April 1934, he followed up his Chicago performance by winning the United States Amateur Champion National AAU tournament in St. Louis, Missouri.
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  • 1933
    In 1933, Louis won the Detroit-area Golden Gloves Novice Division championship against Joe Biskey for the light heavyweight classification.
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  • 1932
    Louis made his debut in early 1932 at age 17.
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  • 1926
    In 1926, shaken by a gang of white men in the Ku Klux Klan, Louis's family moved to Detroit, Michigan, forming part of the post-World War I Great Migration.
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  • 1920
    Around 1920, Louis's mother married Pat Brooks, a local construction contractor, having received word that Munroe Barrow had died while institutionalized (in reality, Munroe Barrow lived until 1938, unaware of his son's fame).
  • 1916
    Louis spent twelve years growing up in rural Alabama, where little is known of his childhood. He suffered from a speech impediment and spoke very little until about the age of six. Munroe Barrow was committed to a mental institution in 1916 and, as a result, Joe knew very little of his biological father.
  • 1914
    Born on May 13, 1914.
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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