John Quincy Adams

American politician John Quincy Adams

John Quincy Adams /ˈkwɪnzi/ was the sixth President of the United States. He served as an American diplomat, Senator, and Congressional representative. He was a member of the Federalist, Democratic-Republican, National Republican, and later Anti-Masonic and Whig parties. Adams was the son of former President John Adams and Abigail Adams.
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John Adams: Wait for football too long; season too fast - GoVolsXtra
Google News - over 6 years
You know how it goes. August drags along like a blocking sled being pushed by sportswriters. But once the college football season starts, the days fly by like plays in Oregon's offense. If August inches along for fans, you can make an
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John Adams: Experience pays off for Kirk Triplett - Knoxville News Sentinel
Google News - over 6 years
Kirk Triplett hoists the championship trophy after winning the News Sentinel Open presented by Pilot with a 21-under at Fox Den Country Club Sunday, Aug. 28, 2011. Triplett shot 4-under for the day and finished two strokes ahead of second place winner
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John Adams: Coaching consistency will pay off for Vols - GoVolsXtra
Google News - over 6 years
Tennessee head coach Derek Dooley watches a replay on the Jumbotron during the Orange and White game at Neyland Stadium Saturday, April 16, 2011. One season isn't long enough to judge a football coach. But if you're already determined to
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Niles credits defense against John Adams - Youngstown Vindicator
Google News - over 6 years
In a fight to the finish, Niles defeated Cleveland John Adams 17-15 on Friday at Bo Rein Stadium. Niles led 17-7 after three quarters, but John Adams narrowed the scoring gap to two points with a fourth quarter touchdown when William Doyle
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John Adams: News Sentinel Open goes from survival to success - Knoxville News Sentinel
Google News - over 6 years
This News Sentinel Open doesn't look much different from the last one on first glance. John Daly is back. So are his fans and Loudmouth pants. The weather is good. The scores are even better. And tournament director Patrick Nichol is
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Marriage equality - Salt Lake Tribune
Google News - over 6 years
Clark seems to think that Founding Fathers George Washington and John Adams would assail the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community! Washington and Adams were both religious and champions of the Enlightenment. Within their tradition of
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John Adams, too, deserves a monument - Tulsa World
Google News - over 6 years
But in my view, it is unfortunate that there is no grand monument to one of the most important Founders, our second president, John Adams. It is widely acknowledged by historians that he was a guiding force in encouraging and inspiring the colonists to
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Sedition Act becomes law, July 14, 1798 - Politico
Google News - over 6 years
It carried an expiration date of March 3, 1801, the day before John Adams's presidential term ended. With the fledgling United States engaged in naval hostilities against revolutionary France in a “quasi-war,” Alexander Hamilton and congressional
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John Adams: Haas an example of passing Tour torch - Knoxville News Sentinel
Google News - over 6 years
Hunter Haas isn't playing in this year's News Sentinel Open. But he's still a part of it. So is almost every other golfer on the Nationwide Tour who has advanced to the PGA Tour. The attraction of this August's Knoxville Open isn't just
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John Adams Deserves a Monument in Washington - U.S. News & World Report (blog)
Google News - over 6 years
Writing in The Washington Post, Alexander Heffner recently asked, “Why doesn't John Adams have a memorial?” It's a good question. Adams, the second president of the United States, was a seminal figure in the American struggle for
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John Adams: Off-the-field adjustments now crucial - GoVolsXtra
Google News - over 6 years
Some take minutes. Others take years. And the quickness with which they are made determines games and championships. A defensive coach might figure out a subtle change in an opponent's blocking scheme between downs
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of John Quincy Adams
    OTHER
  • 1848
    Died on February 23, 1848.
  • 1847
    Although there is no indication that the two were close, Adams met Abraham Lincoln during the latter's sole term as a member of the House of Representatives, from 1847 until Adams' death.
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  • 1846
    In 1846, the 78-year-old former president suffered a stroke that left him partially paralyzed. After a few months of rest, he made a full recovery and resumed his duties in Congress. When Adams entered the House chamber, everyone "stood up and applauded." On February 21, 1848, the House of Representatives was discussing the matter of honoring U.S. Army officers who served in the Mexican–American War.
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  • 1843
    In 1843, Adams sat for the earliest confirmed photograph still in existence of a U.S. president, although other sources contend that William Henry Harrison had posed even earlier for his portrait, in 1841.
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  • 1841
    Adams appeared on 24 February 1841, and spoke for four hours.
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    In 1841, at the request of Lewis Tappan and Ellis Gray, Adams joined the case of United States v. The Amistad.
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  • 1839
    In 1839, he was elected a member of the American Antiquarian Society.
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  • 1834
    Adams withdrew and endorsed Davis, preferring him over Morton, and Davis was chosen by the legislature in January 1834.
  • 1833
    Adams ran for Governor of Massachusetts in 1833 on the Anti-Masonic ticket.
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  • 1831
    He was elected to nine terms, serving as a Representative for 17 years, from 1831 until his death.
  • 1830
    Adams did not retire after leaving office. Instead he ran for and won a seat in the United States House of Representatives in the 1830 elections.
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  • 1829
    John Quincy Adams left office on March 4, 1829, after losing the election of 1828 to Andrew Jackson.
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  • 1828
    Besides his opposition to slavery and the gag rule (discussed above), his congressional career is remembered for several other key accomplishments. Shortly after Adams entered Congress, the Nullification Crisis threatened civil war over the Tariff of 1828.
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    In authoring a change to the Tariff of 1828, he was instrumental to the compromise that ended the Nullification Crisis.
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    For four years he worked hard, with help from his supporters in Congress, to defeat Adams in the presidential election of 1828.
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    By signing into law the Tariff of 1828, quite unpopular in parts of the south, he further antagonized the Jacksonians.
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  • 1827
    After Adams lost control of Congress in 1827, the situation became more complicated.
  • 1825
    In 1825 Adams signed a bill for the creation of a national observatory just before leaving presidential office.
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    After the inauguration of Adams in 1825, Jackson resigned from his senate seat.
    Adams served as the sixth President of the United States from March 4, 1825, to March 4, 1829.
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    Clay's personal dislike for Jackson and the similarity of his American System to Adams' position on tariffs and internal improvements caused him to throw his support to Adams, who was elected by the House on February 9, 1825, on the first ballot.
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  • 1824
    Adams was elected president in a close and controversial four-way contest in 1824.
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  • 1823
    From this, Adams authored what came to be known as the Monroe Doctrine, which was introduced on December 2, 1823.
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  • 1821
    By the time Monroe became president, several European powers, in particular Spain, were attempting to re-establish control over South America. On Independence Day 1821, in response to those who advocated American support for independence movements in many South American countries, Adams gave a speech in which he said that American policy was moral support for independence movements but not armed intervention.
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  • 1819
    Adams used the events that had unfolded in Florida to negotiate the Florida Treaty with Spain in 1819 that turned Florida over to the U.S. and resolved border issues regarding the Louisiana Purchase.
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  • 1818
    As Secretary of State, he negotiated the Adams–Onís Treaty (which acquired Florida for the United States), the Treaty of 1818, and wrote the Monroe Doctrine.
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  • 1817
    Adams served as Secretary of State in the Cabinet of President James Monroe from 1817 until 1825.
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  • 1815
    Finally, he was sent to be minister to the Court of St. James's (Britain) from 1815 until 1817, a post that was first held by his father.
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  • 1814
    In 1814, Adams was recalled from Russia to serve as chief negotiator of the U.S. commission for the Treaty of Ghent, which ended the War of 1812 between the United States and United Kingdom.
  • 1813
    The U.S. accepted the offer and in July 1813, two associates of Adams, Albert Gallatin and James A. Bayard arrived in St. Petersburg to begin negotiations under mediation by Alexander.
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  • 1812
    Also in 1812, Rumyantsev asked if he should request Alexander to mediate a pacification of hostilities between the United States and Great Britain.
    In 1812, Adams witnessed and reported the news of Napoleon's invasion of Russia and Napoleon's disastrous retreat.
  • 1811
    In 1811, Adams received a commission from the Secretary of State as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.
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  • 1809
    Because of the many delays, the Adamses did not arrive in St. Petersburg until October 23, 1809.
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    After resigning his post at Harvard, Adams and his wife Louisa boarded a merchant ship in Boston on Aug. 5, 1809.
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    President James Madison appointed Adams as the first ever United States Minister to Russia in 1809 (though Francis Dana and William Short had previously been nominated to the post, neither presented his credentials at Saint Petersburg).
  • 1808
    The Federalist-controlled Massachusetts Legislature chose a replacement for Adams on June 3, 1808, several months early.
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  • 1803
    The Massachusetts General Court elected Adams as a Federalist to the U.S. Senate soon after, and he served from March 4, 1803, until 1808, when he broke with the Federalist Party.
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  • 1802
    In November 1802 he ran as a Federalist for the United States House of Representatives and lost.
    John Quincy Adams was elected a member of the Massachusetts State Senate in April 1802.
  • 1797
    While serving abroad, in 1797 Adams also married Louisa Catherine Johnson, the daughter of a poor American merchant, in a ceremony at the church of All Hallows-by-the-Tower, London.
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    When the elder Adams became president, he appointed his son in 1797 as Minister to Prussia at Washington's urging.
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    He became a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1797.
  • 1796
    Though he wanted to return to private life at the end of his appointment, Washington appointed him minister to Portugal in 1796, where he was soon appointed to the Berlin Legation.
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  • 1793
    Adams first won national recognition when he published a series of widely read articles supporting Washington's decision to keep America out of the growing hostilities surrounding the French Revolution. Soon after, George Washington appointed Adams minister to the Netherlands (at the age of 26) in 1793.
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  • 1791
    He was admitted to the bar in 1791 and began practicing in Boston.
  • 1787
    He entered Harvard College and graduated in 1787 with a Bachelor of Arts degree, Phi Beta Kappa.
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  • 1781
    He matriculated in Leiden January 10, 1781.
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  • 1779
    In 1779, Adams began a diary that he kept until just before he died in 1848.
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  • 1778
    Much of Adams' youth was spent accompanying his father overseas. John Adams served as an American envoy to France from 1778 until 1779 and to the Netherlands from 1780 until 1782, and the younger Adams accompanied his father on these diplomatic missions.
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  • 1767
    John Quincy Adams was born on July 11, 1767, to John Adams and his wife Abigail Adams (née Smith) in a part of Braintree, Massachusetts that is now Quincy.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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