Julian Barnes

English writer Julian Barnes

Julian Patrick Barnes is a contemporary English writer. Barnes won the Man Booker Prize for his book The Sense of an Ending (2011), and three of his earlier books had been shortlisted for the Booker Prize: Flaubert's Parrot (1984), England, England (1998), and Arthur & George (2005). He has also written crime fiction under the pseudonym Dan Kavanagh (his late wife's surname), though has published nothing under that name for more than twenty-five years.
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An Unexamined Life, Examined And Re-Examined: 'The Sense Of An Ending'
NPR - 12 months
An unsparing, unsentimental Julian Barnes novel gets a straightforward treatment — and a tacked-on, falsely redemptive ending — in Ritesh Batra's film. (Image credit: Robert Viglasky/CBS Films)
Article Link:
 NPR article
'1984' Sales Have Skyrocketed. Here’s What To Read Next.
Huffington Post - about 1 year
function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Last week, after Kellyanne Conway gave an interview describing falsehoods as “alternative facts,” sales of George Orwell’s decades-old classic 1984 spiked. The book, a part of so many high-school syllabi, appears to be helping people contextualize political rhetoric; the sales boost even led Michiko Kakutani at The New York Times to write an homage to the still-relevant novel, headlined “Why ‘1984’ Is a 2017 Must-Read.” But, as The New Republic pointed ou...
Article Link:
 Huffington Post article
Weekend Roundup: How to Curb the Mobocratic Algorithm of Social Media
Huffington Post - over 1 year
Wael Ghonim is the internet activist who helped spawn the Arab Spring in Egypt with his Facebook posts. During those heady days in Cairo, as he explains in an interview with The WorldPost, Ghonim came to realize that, “the algorithmic structure of social media amplified and abetted the turn to mobocracy” because it is designed to bring together those with common passions and sympathies irrespective of whether the information they share is truth, rumor or lies. In our present moment, says Ghonim, “Donald Trump is the living example of the damage mobocratic algorithms can do to the democratic process.” The challenge has thus shifted, he says. “While once social media was seen as a liberating means to speak truth to power,” Ghonim argues, “now the issue is how to speak truth to social media.” Since “people will be as shallow as platforms allow them to be,” he explains, Ghonim proposes that the big social media companies focus on creating a “meritocratic algorithm” that rewards cr...
Article Link:
 Huffington Post article
How My Millennial Students Found Their 'Hitchhiker's Guide' to a Secular Age
Huffington Post - over 1 year
This essay is part of a series, produced by the Berggruen Institute and Zócalo Public Square, on philosopher Charles Taylor, recipient of the 2016 Berggruen Prize. When I announced in 2011 that my senior undergraduate seminar would be devoted to wading through Charles Taylor’s mammoth 900-page tome, “A Secular Age,” I wasn’t sure what to expect. Taylor is one of the world’s most celebrated thinkers, but I had my doubts that my students at Calvin College, a Christian liberal arts college of about 4,000 students, would want to wrestle with the work of this notoriously difficult Canadian philosopher. When the seminar table filled, I was intrigued. Either these students were gluttons for punishment, or Taylor’s questions about belief and unbelief in the 21st century had struck a nerve. We began working through Taylor’s dense argument and I worried that we’d soon lose each other in the dark forest of his prose. Like with Hansel and Gretel, reading Taylo...
Article Link:
 Huffington Post article
12 Contemporary British Novels We Can't Live Without
Huffington Post - almost 2 years
By Caitlin Kleinschmidt | Off the Shelf As a lifelong Anglophile, I have worshipped at the altar of Austen, Brontë, and Dickens ever since I received my first copy of Pride and Prejudice in the fourth grade. But British literature goes far beyond the country manors and moody moors of the nineteenth century. Here are twelve fantastic novels from some of the most exciting contemporary novelists across the pond that every self-respecting Anglophile should read.   White Teeth by Zadie Smith White Teeth plays out its bounding, vibrant course in a Jamaican hair salon in North London, an Indian restaurant in Leicester Square, an Irish poolroom turned immigrant café, a liberal public school, and a sleek science institute, while it takes on faith, race, gender, history, and culture. Zadie Smith's dazzling first novel is not to be missed. Read the review here   The Paying Guests by Sarah Waters Sarah Waters earned a reputation as one of Britain's great writers of historica...
Article Link:
 Huffington Post article
Julian Barnes Takes on Shostakovich
Wall Street Journal - almost 2 years
In his new novel, “The Noise of Time,” Julian Barnes reimagines the life of composer Dmitri Shostakovich and his coercive treatment in Soviet Russia.
Article Link:
 Wall Street Journal article
32 New Books To Add To Your Shelf In 2016
Huffington Post - about 2 years
Whether you’ve promised yourself that 2016 will be the year you’ll read more books, the year you’ll read books more thoughtfully or the year you’ll read fewer curmudgeonly comments sections, we have a few new releases worth considering. We’re looking forward to bold familial debuts, whimsical fable-like stories and sprawling sagas by the usual suspects (we’re looking at you, Don DeLillo). Our list has you covered through May -- here’s hoping you’re resolute with your reading resolutions until then! JANUARY   The Past by Tessa Hadley Jan. 5 Hadley’s popular reputation, especially in the U.S., hasn’t caught up with her critical one. But this novel, which uses her much-praised perceptiveness and her fine-brushed prose to tell a story of familial secrets and tensions, may help her break through. -CF   Your Heart Is a Muscle the Size of a Fist by Sunil Yapa Jan. 12 Yapa’s debut is a searing, stylishly written novel voiced through seven cha...
Article Link:
 Huffington Post article
32 New Books To Add To Your Shelf In 2016
Huffington Post - about 2 years
Whether you’ve promised yourself that 2016 will be the year you’ll read more books, the year you’ll read books more thoughtfully or the year you’ll read fewer curmudgeonly comments sections, we have a few new releases worth considering. We’re looking forward to bold familial debuts, whimsical fable-like stories and sprawling sagas by the usual suspects (we’re looking at you, Don DeLillo). Our list has you covered through May -- here’s hoping you’re resolute with your reading resolutions until then! JANUARY   The Past by Tessa Hadley Jan. 5 Hadley’s popular reputation, especially in the U.S., hasn’t caught up with her critical one. But this novel, which uses her much-praised perceptiveness and her fine-brushed prose to tell a story of familial secrets and tensions, may help her break through. -CF   Your Heart Is a Muscle the Size of a Fist by Sunil Yapa Jan. 12 Yapa’s debut is a searing, stylishly written novel voiced through seven characte...
Article Link:
 Huffington Post article
17 Inspirational New Year's Reads For The Self-Help Skeptic
Huffington Post - about 2 years
A new year, a new you! Right? It's tough to keep those New Year's resolutions, though, and a little guidance or inspiration never hurts. The right book means you're never going it alone with your plan to be more generous with your time, to commit to hitting the gym, to become your best self. That book doesn't need to be a self-help book, either. If you've never envisioned yourself accumulating a shelf full of The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People and He's Just Not That Into You and The Four-Hour Body, you can still turn to your bookcases for motivation and instruction.  The Arts & Culture team put our heads together to compile some of our favorite inspirational reads -- ones even self-help skeptics will love -- to start your year off right.   Maddie Crum:  The Folded Clock: A Diary by Heidi Julavits The subtitle of Heidi Julavits's latest book -- "A diary" -- is a bit of a misnomer. While The Folded Clock brims with thoughtful self-analysis and goofy ane...
Article Link:
 Huffington Post article
17 Inspirational New Year's Reads For The Self-Help Skeptic
Huffington Post - about 2 years
A new year, a new you! Right? It's tough to keep those New Year's resolutions, though, and a little guidance or inspiration never hurts. The right book means you're never going it alone with your plan to be more generous with your time, to commit to hitting the gym, to become your best self. That book doesn't need to be a self-help book, either. If you've never envisioned yourself accumulating a shelf full of The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People and He's Just Not That Into You and The Four-Hour Body, you can still turn to your bookcases for motivation and instruction.  The Arts & Culture team put our heads together to compile some of our favorite inspirational reads -- ones even self-help skeptics will love -- to start your year off right.   Maddie Crum:  The Folded Clock: A Diary by Heidi Julavits The subtitle of Heidi Julavits's latest book -- "A diary" -- is a bit of a misnomer. While The Folded Clock brims with thoughtful self-analysis and goofy ane...
Article Link:
 Huffington Post article
Belgian Police Thwart Potential Dec. 31 Attack
Wall Street Journal - about 2 years
Belgian authorities arrested two people on terrorism charges, potentially breaking up a plan to attack year-end festivities in the Belgian capital. WSJ's Julian Barnes reports on Lunch Break. Photo: AP
Article Link:
 Wall Street Journal article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Julian Barnes
    FORTIES
  • 2013
    In 2013, Barnes took on the British government over its "mass closure of public libraries", Britain's "slip down the world league table for literacy" and its "ideological worship of the market – as quasi-religious as nature-worship – and an ever-widening gap between rich and poor."
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    In 2013 Barnes published Levels of Life.
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  • 2011
    Barnes' eleventh novel, The Sense of an Ending, published by Jonathan Cape, was released on 4 August 2011.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 2003
    In 2003, Barnes undertook a rare acting role as the voice of Georges Simenon in a BBC Radio 4 series of adaptations of Inspector Maigret stories.
  • TWENTIES
  • 1996
    Barnes is a keen Francophile, and his 1996 book Cross Channel, is a collection of 10 stories charting Britain's relationship with France.
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  • 1991
    In 1991, he published Talking It Over, a contemporary love triangle, in which the three characters take turns to talk to the reader, reflecting over common events.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1989
    In 1989 Barnes published A History of the World in 10½ Chapters, which was also a non-linear novel, which uses a variety of writing styles to call into question the perceived notions of human history and knowledge itself.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1979
    From 1979 to 1986 he worked as a television critic, first for the New Statesman and then for The Observer.
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  • OTHER
  • 1956
    In 1956 the family moved to Northwood, Middlesex, the 'Metroland' of his first novel.
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  • 1946
    Born on January 19, 1946.
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