Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

Basketball player Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is a retired American professional basketball player. He is the NBA's all-time leading scorer, with 38,387 points. During his career with the NBA's Milwaukee Bucks and Los Angeles Lakers from 1969 to 1989, Abdul-Jabbar won six NBA championships and a record six regular season MVP Awards. In college at UCLA, he played on three consecutive national championship teams, and his high school team won 71 consecutive games.
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Kareem Abdul-Jabbar's personal information overview.
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The View From Pluto: LeBron James Could Become The 'Accidental' All-Time Leading Scorer
NPR - about 1 month
Cavs’ star LeBron James is on pace to hit a milestone this weekend. He’s closing in on becoming just the seventh player in NBA history to score 30,000 career points. But WKSU commentator Terry Pluto says scoring the most points has never been James' goal. James is 41 points away from hitting 30,000 career points. He'll then be just 802 points behind Dirk Nowitzki to take over the No. 6 spot on the all-time scoring list. And Pluto says it's possible James could eventually surpass No. 1 on that list -- Kareem Abdul-Jabbar . "Abdul-Jabbar had 38,000 points and played until he was 41. LeBron's in his 15th season and basically gets about 2,000 points a season. He could pass Abdul-Jabbar by the time he's 37. Next on the list is Karl Malone, then Kobe Bryant and Michael Jordan and Wilt Chamberlain. He'll blow past them in about a year and a half." Pluto says one reason why he's confident James will accomplish the feat is that he's never seriously injured. The accidental leading scorer Pluto
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 NPR article
Sid Catlett, 69, Star of a Classic High School Basketball Game, Dies
NYTimes - 3 months
In 1965 he led his school against the team led by Lew Alcindor, soon to be known as Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, and ended its 71-game winning streak.
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 NYTimes article
Kim and Khloe Kardashian Reveal Reality TV Regrets: 'Khloe & Lamar,' Kris Humphries Wedding Special & More - Entertainment Tonight
Google News - 6 months
Entertainment Tonight Kim and Khloe Kardashian Reveal Reality TV Regrets: 'Khloe & Lamar,' Kris Humphries Wedding Special & More Entertainment Tonight Rocking a variety of sexy bodysuits, silky bra tops and high-waisted pants, Khloe, Kourtney and Kim Kardashian, along with mom Kris Jenner and younger sisters Kylie and Kendall, stun on the magazine's latest cover. In their accompanying feature, the ... Kareem Abdul-Jabbar on Kris Jenner: Role-Model Businesswoman or Queen of Exploitation?Hollywood Reporter Kim Kardashian Wanted Kendall Jenner To 'Speak Up' After Pepsi MessHuffPost OJ Simpson NOT Threatening To “Cut Up” Kris Jenner, Despite Tabloid Cover StoryGossip Cop PerezHilton.com -Cosmopolitan.com -Just Jared -ETCanada.com all 34 news articles »
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 Google News article
From Skyhook To STEM: Kareem Abdul Jabbar Brings The Science
NPR - 7 months
The NBA's all-time leading scorer talks about the importance of STEM and his education foundation, and its support for a science camp for public school children in Los Angeles. (Image credit: LA Johnson/NPR)
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 NPR article
California Today: California Today: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar on the Wisdom of John Wooden
New York Times - 9 months
Thursday: A conversation with Mr. Abdul-Jabbar, a rallying cry on the environment, and living in downtown San Diego for $525 a month.
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 New York Times article
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar appears on 'The Bachelorette' months after harshly criticizing the TV franchise
LATimes - 9 months
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar penned a harsh critique of ABC’s “The Bachelor” and “The Bachelorette” franchise for the Hollywood Reporter earlier this year. In it, the Lakers legend stated “there is an insidious darkness beneath the fairy tale pabulum they are serving up” and “the real crime is the lack...
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 LATimes article
Monday's TV highlights: 'Gotham' on Fox
LATimes - 9 months
  SERIES The Bachelorette Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis judge the guys while they compete in an obstacle course, then Kareem Abdul-Jabbar plays basketball with the bachelors. 8 p.m. ABC Gotham As she did last year, Jada Pinkett Smith returns late in the season as Fish Mooney as villains gather...
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 LATimes article
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Writes About His Friendship With Coach Wooden
NPR - 9 months
NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks to writer and sports legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar about his book, Coach Wooden and Me, about his 50-year relationship with his UCLA basketball coach John Wooden.
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 NPR article
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Writes About His Friendship With Coach Wooden
NPR - 9 months
NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks to writer and sports legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar about his book, Coach Wooden and Me, about his 50-year relationship with his UCLA basketball coach John Wooden.
Article Link:
 NPR article
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Reflects On A Life-Altering Friendship
NPR - 9 months
NBA legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar on his 50-year relationship with his coach John Wooden, how he shaped his life and career. (Image credit: Photo by Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images)
Article Link:
 NPR article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
    FORTIES
  • 2016
    In 2016, he performed a tribute to friend Muhammad Ali along with Chance the Rapper.
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  • 2015
    In April 2015, Abdul-Jabbar was admitted to the hospital when diagnosed with cardiovascular disease.
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    Abdul-Jabbar has also been a regular contributor to discussions about issues of race and religion, among other topics, in national magazines and on television. He has written a regular column for Time, for example, and he appeared on Meet the Press on Sunday, January 25, 2015, to talk about a recent column, which pointed out that Islam should not be blamed for the actions of violent extremists, just as Christianity has not been blamed for the actions of violent extremists who profess Christianity.
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    In 2015, he appeared in an HBO documentary on his life, Kareem: Minority of One.
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    In 2015, ESPN named Abdul-Jabbar the best center in NBA history, and ranked him No. 2 behind Michael Jordan among the greatest NBA players ever.
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  • 2014
    Abdul-Jabbar has also appeared with Robert Hays (Ted Striker) in a 2014 Airplane! parody commercial promoting Wisconsin tourism.
  • 2013
    Abdul-Jabbar was selected to appear in the 2013 ABC reality series Splash, a celebrity diving competition.
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  • 2012
    He had a recurring role as himself on the NBC series Guys with Kids, which aired from 2012–13.
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    In 2012, he was selected by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to be a U.S. global cultural ambassador.
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  • 2011
    On February 10, 2011, Abdul-Jabbar debuted his film On the Shoulders of Giants, documenting the tumultuous journey of the famed yet often-overlooked Harlem Renaissance professional basketball team, at Science Park High School in Newark, New Jersey.
    Abdul-Jabbar also voiced himself in a 2011 episode of The Simpsons titled "Love Is a Many Strangled Thing".
  • THIRTIES
  • 2006
    He has also made appearances on The Colbert Report, in a 2006 skit called "HipHopKetball II: The ReJazzebration Remix '06" and in 2008 as a stage manager who is sent out on a mission to find Nazi gold.
  • 2002
    Abdul-Jabbar has worked as an assistant for the Los Angeles Clippers and the Seattle SuperSonics, helping mentor, among others, their young centers, Michael Olowokandi and Jerome James. Abdul-Jabbar was the head coach of the Oklahoma Storm of the United States Basketball League in 2002, leading the team to the league's championship that season, but he failed to land the head coaching position at Columbia University a year later.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1994
    He also appeared in the television version of Stephen King's The Stand, played the Archangel of Basketball in Slam Dunk Ernest, and had a brief non-speaking cameo appearance in BASEketball. Abdul-Jabbar was also the co-executive producer of the 1994 TV film Road to Freedom: The Vernon Johns Story.
    He also played himself on the February 10, 1994 episode of the sketch comedy television series In Living Color.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1984
    Abdul-Jabbar played a genie in a lamp in a 1984 episode of Tales from the Darkside.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1980
    In 1980, he played co-pilot Roger Murdock in Airplane!
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    Abdul-Jabbar combined dominance during his career peak with the longevity and sustained excellence of his latter years. After claiming his sixth and final MVP in 1980, he continued to average above 20 points in the following six seasons, including 23 points per game in his 17th season at age 38.
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  • 1978
    Abdul-Jabbar and Janice divorced in 1978.
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  • 1976
    While in Los Angeles, Abdul-Jabbar started doing yoga in 1976 to improve his flexibility, and was notable for his physical fitness regimen.
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    In the 1976–77 season, Abdul-Jabbar had another strong season.
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  • 1975
    In the 1975–76 season, his first with the Lakers, he had a dominating season, averaging 27.7 points per game and leading the league in rebounding, blocked shots, and minutes played.
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    In 1975, the Lakers acquired Abdul-Jabbar and reserve center Walt Wesley from the Bucks for center Elmore Smith, guard Brian Winters, and rookie "blue chippers" Dave Meyers and Junior Bridgeman.
    In 1975, he was traded to the Lakers, with whom he played the last 14 seasons of his career and won five additional NBA championships.
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  • 1974
    Although Abdul-Jabbar always spoke well of Milwaukee and its fans, he said that being in the Midwest did not fit his cultural needs and requested a trade to either New York or Los Angeles in October 1974.
    While remaining relatively injury-free throughout his NBA career, Abdul-Jabbar twice broke one of his hands. The first time was during a pre-season game in 1974, when he was bumped hard and got his eye scratched, which angered him enough to punch the basket support stanchion.
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    In 1974, Abdul-Jabbar won his third MVP Award in five years and was among the top five NBA players in scoring (27. ppg, third), rebounding (14.5 rpg, fourth), blocked shots (283, second), and field goal percentage (.539, second).
  • 1972
    Playing in Los Angeles facilitated Abdul-Jabbar's trying his hand at acting. He made his film debut in Bruce Lee's 1972 film Game of Death, in which his character Hakim fights Billy Lo (played by Lee).
  • 1971
    After winning his first NBA championship in 1971, he adopted the Muslim name Kareem Abdul-Jabbar at age 24.
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  • 1969
    He was also chosen first overall in the 1969 American Basketball Association draft by the New York Nets.
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    The Harlem Globetrotters offered Alcindor $1 million to play for them, but he declined, and was picked first in the 1969 NBA draft by the Milwaukee Bucks (who were in only their second season of existence).
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  • OTHER
  • 1968
    In the summer of 1968, while attending UCLA, he took the Shahada twice and converted to Sunni Islam, only later making his name change official.
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    While playing for UCLA, Alcindor suffered a scratched left cornea on January 12, 1968, at the Cal game when he was struck by Tom Henderson of Cal in a rebound battle.
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  • 1967
    In 1967 and 1968, he also won USBWA College Player of the Year which later became the Oscar Robertson Trophy.
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    Lew Alcindor played on the UCLA freshman team only because the "freshman rule" was in effect. From 1967–69, he played under coach John Wooden, contributing to the team's three-year record of 88 wins and only two losses: one to the University of Houston in which Alcindor had a not fully healed eye injury (see below), and the other to crosstown rival USC who played a "stall game" (i.e., there was no shot clock in those days, so a team could hold the ball as long as it wanted before attempting to score).
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  • 1947
    Born on April 16, 1947.
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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