Kathleen Winsor

American writer Kathleen Winsor

Kathleen Winsor was an American author, best known for the romance novel Forever Amber.
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Biography
Kathleen Winsor's personal information overview.
Deceased
26 May 2003

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Extra! Read all about it! - Northumberland Today
Google News - over 6 years
On certain Sundays, walking to church and aware the Sunday People was carrying a serialized version of Kathleen Winsor's novel, Forever Amber (banned in 14 American states), we would buy a copy, hide it in the vestry until our angelic soprano voices
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 Google News article
TBR; Inside the List
NYTimes - over 6 years
SLEEP, MEMORY: George R. R. Martin, as expected, claims the hardcover fiction throne with ''A Dance With Dragons,'' the fifth installment in his ''Song of Ice and Fire'' fantasy series. But this week's list does feature one out-of-nowhere literary sensation. Back in 2008, S. J. Watson was a 30-something London audiologist working with deaf children
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 NYTimes article
Today's Letters: Reflecting on Afghanistan - National Post (blog)
Google News - over 6 years
My mates and I always sat on the second level in Dunfermline Abbey and endured the sermons by reading “Forever Amber,” the scandalously sexy and saucy novel by Kathleen Winsor, which was serialized weekly in the paper. I was 12 years old at the time
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Recuerdan a Kathleen Winsor, la musa de la obscenidad - Diario Provincia
Google News - almost 7 years
México, DF- Polémica, atrevida e intrigante en su estilo literario, la escritora Kathleen Winsor, quien murió el 26 de mayo de 2003, fue criticada en diversas ocasiones por enfatizar en varias de sus obras mujeres descaradas y cautivadas por el sexo
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Bestselling Handbook on How to Write a Blockbuster - American Banking News (press release)
Google News - almost 7 years
... Eric Segal (Love Story), and Kathleen Winsor (Forever Amber). Click below to read the riveting review: The book begins by examining and dispelling the fears of young writers and supplying them a list of topics that make run-away bestsellers
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 Google News article
Swing and Loathing
NYTimes - almost 8 years
THREE CHORDS FOR BEAUTY'S SAKE The Life of Artie Shaw By Tom Nolan Illustrated. 430 pp. W. W. Norton & Company. $29.95 Artie Shaw, the swing era's other great clarinetist, knew just about every romantic self-immolator in the history of jazz. He roomed with both Bix Beiderbecke and Bunny Berigan, he hired Billie Holiday to sing with his band and --
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Artie Shaw, Bandleader, Composer and Wizard of the Clarinet, Is Dead at 94
NYTimes - about 13 years
Artie Shaw, the jazz clarinetist and big-band leader who successfully challenged Benny Goodman's reign as the King of Swing with his recordings of ''Begin the Beguine,'' ''Lady Be Good'' and ''Star Dust'' in the late 1930's, died yesterday at his home in Newbury Park, Calif. He was 94. He apparently died of natural causes, his lawyer, Eddie Ezor,
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Kathleen Winsor, 83; Wrote 'Forever Amber'
NYTimes - almost 15 years
Kathleen Winsor, whose 1944 novel ''Forever Amber,'' detailing the sexual adventures of a young woman in Restoration England, became a model for romantic best sellers to follow, died on Monday at her home in Manhattan. She was 83. ''Miss Winsor, if she felt so inclined, could justifiably claim to be the woman who invented the modern best seller,''
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Paid Notice: Deaths WINSOR, , KATHLEEN,
NYTimes - almost 15 years
WINSOR--Kathleen, author of ''Forever Amber'' published in 1944 and several other novels, died at her home in Manhattan on May 26th, 2003. Ms. Winsor was the widow of Washington lawyer, Paul A. Porter, who died in 1975. No services are planned. >>AD#
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THE CLOSE READER; The Original Band of Brothers
NYTimes - about 15 years
The director of a literary nonprofit organization, who along with Joseph Brodsky used to try to persuade motel clerks to slip volumes of poetry into dressing tables next to the Bibles, finds private funding to revive a World War II-era military giveaway of great books. The Defense Department distributes 100,000 free copies of Sun Tzu's ''Art of
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Observer; Ease in Tabloid World
NYTimes - about 23 years
Here is the latest literature on the royal farce of Windsor. Hasn't all this been in the newspapers already? Or at least all of it that's juicy enough to deserve scanning? I've been scanning this story for what seems like years now. Scanning gets the job done. It's not like Bosnia. You can't scan Bosnia and get to first base. Bosnia is the Marcel
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AT HOME WITH: Artie Shaw; Literary Life, After Ending the Beguine
NYTimes - over 23 years
IT was October 1954 in New York. Artie Shaw had just finished a gig at the old Embers Club on 52d Street. It turned out to be his last. He put down his clarinet that night and has never picked it up again. He was 44, an age at which most men are settling into a career. But he'd been a professional musician for 30 years and he'd had enough. He'd
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BETRAYED BY A GORGEOUS CAD
NYTimes - over 31 years
THROUGH A GLASS DARKLY By Karleen Koen. 743 pp. New York: Random House. $19.95. ONE of the great joys of writing a historical novel is the permission it gives to immerse oneself in the sights, sounds and smells of a vanished world. When readers marvel at the masses of research involved, it is difficult to explain that the research is really the
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PENNY FOR THEIR THOUGHTS -- HOW AUTHORS CAN GET LIBRARY 'ROYALTIES'
NYTimes - almost 32 years
THE dreams of many American authors are connected to a computer and information bank in this small industrial town near Darlington in the northeastern corner of England. Stockton-on-Tees has a quaint literary air about it; it could be the locale for a mystery story set on the nearby moors. In fact, it serves as the little-known headquarters for a
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SUMMER READING; FAMOUS FIRST WORDS: WELL BEGUN IS HALF DONE
NYTimes - over 32 years
In the spirit of summer playfulness, The Book Review asked several writers: What is your favorite opening passage in a work of literature, and why? Some recalled their favorites instantly; others pondered the question for a while before choosing. But all these authors revealed a fondness for other writers' enticements, a willingness to be grabbed
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THE HUM INSIDE THE SKULL-A SYMPOSIUM
NYTimes - almost 34 years
The Book Review asked 16 authors of fiction, age 40 or younger, to name the writer or writers who have most affected their work and to explain how. Here are their replies. Ann Beattie Author of ''The Burning House,'' a collection of short stories. This is a hard question to answer; at the risk of seeming to flatter myself, I don't think I write
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THERE'LL BE A NEW ARTIE SHAW BAND
NYTimes - over 34 years
Artie Shaw, whose recordings of ''Begin the Beguine,'' ''Back Bay Shuffle'' and ''Lady Be Good'' pushed him past Benny Goodman as the most popular swing-band leader of the late 1930's - and who left the music business in the mid-50's vowing never to return - is coming back. And so is one of the most celebrated homes of the swing bands, the Glen
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 NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Kathleen Winsor
    LATE ADULTHOOD
  • 2003
    Age 83
    Winsor died May 26, 2003 in New York City.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1956
    Age 36
    In 1956 Winsor married for the fourth time, to Paul A. Porter, a former head of the Federal Communications Commission. Their marriage ended in 1975 with his death.
  • 1950
    Age 30
    Winsor's next commercially successful novel, Star Money, appeared in 1950, and was a portrait closely drawn from her experience of becoming a bestselling author.
    More Details
  • TWENTIES
  • 1948
    Age 28
    The marriage to Shaw ended in 1948, and Winsor soon married her divorce attorney, Arnold Krakower. That marriage likewise ended in divorce, in 1953.
  • 1946
    Age 26
    Made a celebrity by the success of her novel, Winsor found it unthinkable to return to the married life she had known with Herwig and, in 1946, they divorced.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1938
    Age 18
    She was fired in 1938 when the newspaper chose to trim their workforce.
    More Details
  • 1937
    Age 17
    In 1937, she began writing a thrice-weekly sports column for the Oakland Tribune.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1919
    Born
    Winsor was born October 16, 1919 in Olivia, Minnesota but raised in Berkeley, California.
    More Details
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