Lady Randolph Churchill

US-born British socialite and autobiographer Lady Randolph Churchill

Lady Randolph Churchill, CI, DStJ, born Jeanette Jerome, was the American-born wife of Lord Randolph Churchill and the mother of British Prime Minister Winston Churchill.
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Biography
Lady Randolph Churchill's personal information overview.
Deceased
29 June 1921
home town
Kings County
Death Place
London

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News
News about Lady Randolph Churchill from around the web
Woodstock Literary Festival: Where the word is wonderful - The Independent
Google News - over 6 years
Heather White-Smith came to Downing Street in 1953, a 17-year-old girl with the job of Assistant Private Secretary to Lady Churchill, wife to the Prime Minister. She's now written about her turbulent years working in Churchill's shadow, and is full of
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Woodstock Literary Festival boasts starry line-up - Oxford Times
Google News - over 6 years
The festival will also hear from Heather White-Smith, who as a 17-year-old girl was given the job as assistant private secretary to Lady Churchill. Her new book My Years with the Churchills: A Young Girl's Memories describes her three years working for
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UNO DE LOS NUESTROS - ABC.es
Google News - over 6 years
De hecho, Lady Churchill mandó que lo destruyeran. Noel Coward creía que nadie sabía ya de pintura. Que el arte, como la naturaleza humana, se nos había ido de las manos. Puede que no sepamos de pintura, pero en váteres sucios somos comisarios
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Monet, l'impressionniste dont on ne se lasse pas - Tribune de Genève
Google News - over 6 years
Kirk Douglas, Anthony Quinn et Lady Churchill servant d'appât. Ce soir-là, ce sont les impressionnistes qui sont devenus des stars. Une réputation qui dure avec Monet en chef de file. Mais Daniel Marchesseau préfère le considérer comme «une étoile» et
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Pupatello 'my exemplar' - Windsor Star
Google News - over 6 years
Quite frankly, when I think of putting country first and defending taxpayers in public life, I think of Windsor's Lady Churchill as an exemplar above all others. If there is any tribute such as a statue or scholarship in her honour planned,
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Elements tell many tales - Organiser
Google News - over 6 years
Margaret Thatcher was called the 'Iron lady' Churchill coined 'iron curtain' to indicate the communist rule. Mercury, yet another element known for long, probably 5000 years, “is clearly special, yet also rather useless” says Aldersey-Williams
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The Castle as Show Biz
NYTimes - over 19 years
ALL of England's castles are divided into three kinds. There are the noble ruins now sheltering only ghosts, grass and rusty cannonballs. There are the great country houses still owned and inhabited by the 14th Duchess of Whatevershire, who is mucking about incognito in the garden while tourists tromp through the family public rooms, marveling at
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Theater in the Salesroom
NYTimes - over 19 years
Sotheby's -- Bidding for Class By Robert Lacey. Illustrated. 354 pp. Boston: Little, Brown & Company. $27.95. When Sotheby's offers goods from famous estates like that of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, the 254-year-old auction house becomes a veritable publicity machine, with television cameras filming celebrities in its salesrooms, the buyers'
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At Wimbledon, a Royal Flourish to Tennis
NYTimes - over 20 years
IN one sense, Wimbledon isn't that different from the United States Open at the National Tennis Center in Flushing, Queens. You can get to either tournament by subway. At the Southfield stop on the London underground, signs alert you to ''Alight Here for Wimbledon.'' But after you alight, it's much different. You walk along narrow leafy streets
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Auctions
NYTimes - almost 27 years
After the Boom Sotheby's and Christie's are projecting the lowest totals in five years for their May auctions of Impressionist and modern art in New York. When the catalogues for the evening sessions of these auctions closed this week at both houses, there were 47 works in Sotheby's sale, estimated to bring $30 million to $40 million, and 58 at
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NOTED WITH PLEASURE
NYTimes - almost 28 years
LEAD: Advice to a Young Poet Advice to a Young Poet As a schoolboy of 18, Kenneth Tynan gave a long prose poem on the theme of art for art's sake to James Agate, the leading drama critic of the day. Agate's response to it is quoted in ''The Oxford Book of Humorous Prose,'' edited by Frank Muir (Oxford University). Of course you can write. You write
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Churchill's Sanctuary In Kent
NYTimes - over 29 years
LEAD: A MAN'S house is his best refuge, a legal maxim dictates, and so it was with Chartwell, Winston Churchill's country seat for more than four decades. From late 1922 to his death in 1965 Churchill sought safe harbor at Chartwell through election defeats, stock market losses, the political drought of the 30's (now known as the wilderness years),
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LADY DIANA COOPER IS DEAD; A BELOVED BRITISH ECCENTRIC
NYTimes - over 31 years
Lady Diana Cooper, the legendary beauty of an age long past, who moved with equal ease among High Bohemians and Britain's political elite, died Monday at the London home where she had been bedridden for two years. She was 93 years old. Her acquaintances ran the gamut from the theater to Sir Winston and Lady Churchill to Evelyn Waugh. Chaliapin sang
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'YELLOWBEARD,' A 17TH-CENTURY TREASURE HUNT
NYTimes - over 34 years
IF pitching, as Connie Mack once said, is 75 percent of baseball, what value might be assigned to a script destined to serve an extensive assortment of comic actors? For an answer, consider the pirate movie ''Yellowbeard,'' opening today at the Paramount, Tower East and other theaters, as the vehicle for a trans-Atlantic cast starring Graham
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ART: A WINSTON CHURCHILL EXHIBITION
NYTimes - almost 35 years
SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL made no great claims for his paintings, and he might even have been surprised to find them given a place of honor in an exhibition that begins today at the National Academy of Design. Room after room has been filled with his paintings, under the curatorship of his granddaughters Edwina and Celia Sandys. The general effect is
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Lady Randolph Churchill
    LATE ADULTHOOD
  • 1921
    Age 67
    Died on June 29, 1921.
  • 1918
    Age 64
    Her third marriage, on 1 June 1918, was to Montagu Phippen Porch (1877–1964), a member of the British Civil Service in Nigeria, who was three years Winston's junior.
    More Details
  • FIFTIES
  • 1912
    Age 58
    She separated from her second husband in 1912, and they were divorced in April 1914, whereupon Cornwallis-West married the actress Mrs. Patrick Campbell.
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  • 1908
    Age 54
    In 1908 she wrote her memoirs The Reminiscences of Lady Randolph Churchill.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1902
    Age 48
    Around this time, she became well known for chartering the hospital ship Maine to care for those wounded in the Second Boer War, for which she received the decoration of the Royal Red Cross (RRC) in the South Africa Honours list published on 26 June 1902.
  • 1900
    Age 46
    They were married in London on 28 July 1900; a captain in the Scots Guards, he was the same age as her elder son, Winston.
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  • 1895
    Age 41
    Lord Randolph died in 1895, aged 45.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1874
    Age 20
    According to legend, Jennie Churchill was responsible for the invention of the Manhattan cocktail. She allegedly commissioned a bartender for a special drink to celebrate the election of Samuel J. Tilden to the New York governorship in 1874.
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    Long considered one of the most beautiful women of the time, she was married for the first time on 15 April 1874, aged 20, at the British Embassy in Paris, to Lord Randolph Churchill, the third son of John Winston Spencer-Churchill, 7th Duke of Marlborough and Lady Frances Anne Emily Vane.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1854
    Age 0
    A plaque at 426 Henry St. gives her year of birth as 1850, not 1854.
    More Details
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