Lillian Hellman

American writer and playwright Lillian Hellman

Lillian Florence "Lilly" Hellman was an American author of plays, screenplays, and memoirs and throughout her life, was linked with many left-wing political causes.
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Biography
Lillian Hellman's personal information overview.
Deceased
30 June 1984

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Customer service - The Tand D.com
Google News - over 6 years
American playwright Lillian Hellman (1905-1984) wrote, "It is best to act with confidence, no matter how little right you have to it." Chew on that one! 3. Keep records and receipts of financially significant consumer transactions. 4
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Caracas Retreat - Tablet Magazine
Google News - over 6 years
Among those from the States were Lillian Hellman, Ada Louise Huxtable, Arthur Schlesinger Jr., Elizabeth Hardwick, Robert Lowell, and, as it's put on the television variety shows, “a host of others.” I was part of a youthful contingent that included
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Material falls short on JRT's big night - Buffalo News
Google News - over 6 years
This one escaped from the lips of Christina Rausa, who was on hand for a one-night performance of William Luce's play “Lillian,” a biographical portrait of playwright Lillian Hellman. While Rausa's portrayal of the famously strong-willed and gifted
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IOC green light for Qatar Olympic bid smacks of hypocrisy - Chicago Tribune
Google News - over 6 years
During the McCarthy era witch hunts of the 1950s, when Lillian Hellman was asked by Congress to name fellow artists and writers as communists or communist sympathizers, the playwright answered, "I cannot and will not cut my conscience to fit this
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Taking Stock: The Week Ahead for Greater Brandon (Aug. 24-28) - Patch.com
Google News - over 6 years
Omar Montes at a rehearsal for The Frenzie Life Theatre production of Lillian Hellman's “The Children's Hour” at the Barn Theatre at Winthrop off Bloomingdale Avenue in Riverview. Flexing muscles, lifting (shopping) bags and experiencing
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Frenzie Holds Auditions for 'Cabaret' - Patch.com
Google News - over 6 years
Frenzie co-founder and director Michael Mercer, center, at a recent rehearsal for Lillian Hellman's "The Children's Hour." With him are community theater veterans Cindy Miller-Ray and Pedro Amaral. The Frenzie - Life Theater
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The Frenzie Returns to the Stage With Lillian Hellman's 'The Children's Hour' - Patch.com
Google News - over 6 years
Director Michael Mercer, right, with actors Omar Montes and Cindy Miller-Ray at a rehearsal for The Frenzie - Life Theatre production of Lillian Hellman's “The Children's Hour” at the Barn Theatre at Winthrop off Bloomingdale
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Robert Fulford: War of the proses - National Post (blog)
Google News - over 6 years
The status of Mary McCarthy and Lillian Hellman among the most talented writers in America made their late-in-life legal battle into one of the literary sensations of the 1980s. That event has been revived this summer by the appearance of Just Words:
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Iranian MP Challenges Award For Jailed Journalist - Payvand
Google News - over 6 years
Since 1990, the award has been given to writers who have suffered government persecution for their work; it's in memory of Lillian Hellman and Dashiell Hammett, two American writers subjected to US persecution during the 1950s
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Tom Aldredge, Character Actor, Dies at 83 - New York Times
Google News - over 6 years
His more than two dozen other Broadway credits include a revival of “The Little Foxes,” by Lillian Hellman, in which he played Horace, husband of the scheming Regina Giddens (played by Elizabeth Taylor); and the Stephen Sondheim musicals “Into the
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Lillian Hellman's JULIA by WORD FOR WORD - San Francisco Chronicle
Google News - over 6 years
Word for Word presents an Off the Page reading of JULIA by Lillian Hellman from her memoir Pentimento. A story of danger, intrigue, fear, and friendship, from Hellman's acclaimed memoir. Hellman smuggles desperately needed funds through Nazi Germany at
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Joyce Van Patten To Appear in Peccadillo Reading 7/25 - Broadway World
Google News - over 6 years
Most recently, Peccadillo has produced the first New York City revivals of Lillian Hellman's, Another Part of the Forest and the Schwartz/ Fields musical, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. Occasionally, Peccadillo also produces original material such as Zero
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Capital Stage Co Presents OR, Closes 7/17 - Broadway World
Google News - over 6 years
She received a Lillian Hellman Award for Playwriting in 2010, the Lilly's inaugural year. Other honors include: New Dramatists residency (2001-2008), New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship, Will Glickman Award, Weston Playhouse Music Theater Award
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The Greatest Hollywood Director You May Never Have Heard Of - Huffington Post (blog)
Google News - over 6 years
Adapted from Lillian Hellman's Broadway smash (which starred Tallulah Bankhead), this third and final collaboration between Wyler and Davis, again playing a viper in petticoats, is a caustic, chilling mood piece set in the turn-of-the-century South
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'Awake' and sing this play's praises - The Journal News | LoHud.com
Google News - over 6 years
We've carried a vaguely negative opinion of playwright Clifford Odets for 30 years, ever since Lillian Hellman eviscerated him in her book "Scoundrel Time." Hellman portrayed Odets as one of the leading scoundrels of the 1950s red-baiting era: Odets,
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Tusk Editor's Note: July 8, 2011 - Tuscaloosa News
Google News - over 6 years
Lillian Hellman agreed, saying cynicism is merely “an unpleasant way of saying the truth.” On the flip side, HL Mencken pegged the dude who “when he smells flowers, looks around for a coffin.” Oscar Wilde famously quipped that a cynic is a man “who
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Lillian Hellman
    TEENAGE
  • 1984
    Hellman died on June 30, 1984, aged 79, from a heart attack at her home on Martha's Vineyard.
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  • 1983
    In 1983, New York psychiatrist Muriel Gardiner claimed she was the basis for the title character in Julia and that she had never known Hellman.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1980
    In 1980, Hellman published a short novel, Maybe: A Story.
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  • 1979
    In a 1979 television interview, author Mary McCarthy, long Hellman's political adversary and the object of her negative literary judgment, said of Hellman that "every word she writes is a lie, including 'and' and 'the'."
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    Hellman's reputation suffered after her veracity was attacked by Mary McCarthy during an October 10, 1979 appearance on The Dick Cavett Show.
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  • 1977
    Hellman presented the Academy Award for Best Documentary Film at a ceremony on March 28, 1977. Greeted by a standing ovation, she said: The 1977 Oscar-winning film Julia was based on the "Julia" chapter of Pentimento.
  • 1976
    On June 30, 1976, as the film was going into production, Hellman wrote about the screenplay to its producer:
    In 1976, Hellman's publisher, Little Brown, canceled its contract to publish a book of Diana Trilling's essays because Trilling refused to delete four passages critical of Hellman.
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    In 1976, she posed in a fur coat for the Blackglama national advertising campaign "What Becomes a Legend Most?".
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    Hellman published her third volume of memoirs, Scoundrel Time, in 1976.
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  • 1973
    Her second volume of memoirs, Pentimento: A Book of Portraits, appeared in 1973.
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  • 1969
    Hellman published her first volume of memoirs that touched upon her political, artistic, and social life, An Unfinished Woman: A Memoir, in 1969, for which she received the U.S. National Book Award in category Arts and Letters, which was an award category from 1964 to 1976.
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  • OTHER
  • 1967
    Hellman was a long-time friend of author Dorothy Parker and served as her literary executor after her death in 1967.
  • 1966
    In 1966, she edited a collection of Hammett's stories, The Big Knockover.
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  • 1965
    Hellman wrote another screenplay in 1965 for The Chase, starring Marlon Brando, based on a play and novel by Horton Foote.
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  • 1962
    The following year, in December 1962, Hellman was elected a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and inducted at a May 1963 ceremony.
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  • 1961
    In 1961, Brandeis University awarded her its Creative Arts Medal for outstanding lifetime achievement and the women's division of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Yeshiva University gave her its Achievement Award.
    A second film version of The Children's Hour, less successful both with critics and at the box office, appeared in 1961 under that title, but Hellman played no role in the screenplay, having withdrawn from the project following Hammett's death in 1961.
    Hellman was romantically involved with fellow writer and political activist Dashiell Hammett, author of the classic detective novels The Maltese Falcon and The Thin Man, who also was blacklisted for 10 years until his death in 1961.
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  • 1955
    Hellman edited a collection of Chekhov's correspondence that appeared in 1955 as The Selected Letters of Anton Chekhov.
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  • 1954
    In 1954, Hellman declined when asked to adapt Anne Frank's The Diary of a Young Girl (1952) for the stage.
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  • 1953
    She said that: The State Department dismissed Melby on April 22, 1953.
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  • 1952
    In public testimony before HUAC on Tuesday, May 21, 1952, Hellman answered preliminary questions about her background.
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    On May 19, 1952, Hellman authored a letter to HUAC that one historian has described as "written not to persuade the Committee, but to shape press coverage."
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    In 1952 Hellman was called to testify before HUAC, which had heard testimony that she had attended Communist Party meetings in 1937.
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  • 1951
    The play that is recognized by critics and judged by Hellman as her best, The Autumn Garden, premiered in 1951.
  • 1950
    She described how her relationship with Melby changed over time and how their sexual relationship was briefly renewed in 1950 after a long hiatus: "The relationship obviously at this point was neither one thing nor the other: it was neither over nor was it not over."
  • 1949
    In 1949 she adapted Emmanuel Roblès' French-language play, Montserrat, for Broadway, where it opened on October 29.
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  • 1948
    Melby particularly objected to her support for Henry Wallace in the 1948 presidential election.
  • 1947
    In 1947, Columbia Pictures offered Hellman a multi-year contract, which she refused because the contract included a loyalty clause that she viewed as an infringement on her rights of free speech and association.
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  • 1946
    In May 1946, the National Institute of Arts and Letters made Hellman a member.
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  • 1944
    During her visit from November 5, 1944, to January 18, 1945, she began an affair with John F. Melby, a foreign service officer, that continued as an intermittent affair for years and as a friendship for the rest of her life.
    In August 1944, she received a passport, indicative of government approval, for travel to Russia on a goodwill mission as a guest of VOKS, the Soviet agency that handled cultural exchanges.
  • 1943
    Hellman's applications for a passport to travel to England in April 1943 and May 1944 were both denied because government authorities considered her "an active Communist", although in 1944 the head of the Passport Division of the Department of State, Ruth Shipley, cited "the present military situation" as the reason.
    To establish the difference between her screenplay and the film, Hellman published her screenplay in the fall of 1943.
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  • 1942
    In 1942, Hellman received an Academy Award nomination for her screenplay for the film version of The Little Foxes.
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    Early in 1942, Hellman accompanied the production to Washington, D.C., for a benefit performance where she spoke with President Roosevelt.
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  • 1941
    In October 1941, Hellman and Ernest Hemingway co-hosted a dinner to raise money for anti-Nazi activists imprisoned in France.
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  • 1940
    She wrote the play in 1940, when its call for a united international alliance against Hitler directly contradicted the Communist position at the time, following the Nazi-Soviet Non-Aggression Pact of August 1939.
    On January 9, 1940, viewing the spread of fascism in Europe and fearing similar political developments in the United States, she said at a luncheon of the American Booksellers Association:
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  • 1939
    Her play The Little Foxes opened on Broadway on February 13, 1939, and ran for 410 performances.
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  • 1938
    Hellman was a member of the Communist Party from 1938-40, by her own account written in 1952, "a most casual member.
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    Nevertheless, Hellman had documented her trip in the New Republic in April 1938 as "A Day in Spain".
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  • 1937
    In October 1937, Hellman spent a few weeks in Spain to lend her support, as other writers had, to the International Brigades of non-Spaniards who had joined the anti-Franco side in the Spanish Civil War.
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    In March 1937, Hellman joined a group of 88 U.S. public figures in signing "An Open Letter to American Liberals" that protested an effort headed by John Dewey to examine Leon Trotsky's defense against his 1936 condemnation by the Soviet Union.
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  • 1936
    In December 1936, her play Days to Come closed its Broadway run after just seven performances.
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  • 1935
    In 1935, Hellman joined the struggling Screen Writers Guild, devoted herself to recruiting new members, and proved one of its most aggressive advocates.
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  • 1934
    Hellman's drama The Children's Hour premiered on Broadway on November 24, 1934, and ran for 691 performances.
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  • 1932
    She divorced Kober and returned to New York City in 1932. When she met Hammett in a Hollywood restaurant, she was 24 and he was 36. They maintained their relationship off and on until his death in January 1961.
  • 1930
    Beginning in 1930, for about a year she earned $50 a week as a reader for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in Hollywood, writing summaries of novels and periodical literature for potential screenplays.
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  • 1929
    In 1929, she traveled around Europe for a time and settled in Bonn to continue her education.
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  • 1925
    On December 31, 1925, Hellman married Arthur Kober, a playwright and press agent, although they often lived apart.
  • 1905
    Born on June 20, 1905.
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