Madison Hemings

American freed slave, may be son of Thomas Jefferson Madison Hemings

Madison Hemings, born James Madison Hemings, was the son of the mixed-race slave Sally Hemings; he was the third of four children to survive to adulthood. Born into slavery by his mother's status, he was freed by the will of his master Thomas Jefferson in 1826. Based on historical and DNA evidence, a consensus of historians have come to agree that Jefferson was likely the father of all Hemings' children.
Share
Biography
Madison Hemings's personal information overview.

Photo Albums

Popular photos of Madison Hemings
Relationships
View family, career and love interests for Madison Hemings
News
News about Madison Hemings from around the web
Did Mr Jefferson Do It? - Pajamas Media
Google News - over 6 years
Madison Hemings (1805-1878), a carpenter and joiner, was given his freedom in Jefferson's will; he resettled in southern Ohio in 1836, where he worked at his trade and had a farm. Eston Hemings (1808-c1853), also a carpenter, moved to Chillicothe,
Article Link:
 Google News article
Exploring Grays in a Black-and-White World - Miller-McCune.com
Google News - over 6 years
Three of the Hemingses now believed by historians to have been fathered by Jefferson with Sally Hemings assumed white identities; only Madison Hemings) remained in the black community. American popular culture has long embraced the “one-drop rule,”
Article Link:
 Google News article
The Master and the Mistress
NYTimes - over 9 years
THE HEMINGSES OF MONTICELLO An American Family By Annette Gordon-Reed Illustrated. 798 pp. W. W. Norton & Company. $35 Sometime around 1800, an anonymous American artist produced an arresting painting entitled ''Virginian Luxuries.'' It depicts a slave owner exercising two kinds of power over his human property. On the right, a white man raises his
Article Link:
 NYTimes article
THIS LAND; Atop a Hallowed Mountain, Small Steps Toward Healing
NYTimes - almost 10 years
The members of the 2:20 tour follow their guide up the front steps of Monticello, past those iconic white pillars and into the domed building's aura of wonder. The wooden floor creaks like the knees of an aged host rising from his seat to explain a few things. The guide speaks in present tense of the home's most famous occupant -- Mr. Jefferson, as
Article Link:
 NYTimes article
Editorial Observer; Lust Across the Color Line and the Rise of the Black Elite
NYTimes - almost 13 years
The 1998 DNA study that linked Thomas Jefferson to the final child of his lover Sally Hemings has settled one argument and fired up another. Most historians who had argued that Jefferson was too pure of heart to bed a slave have re-evaluated 200 years of evidence and embraced the emerging consensus: that Jefferson had a long relationship with
Article Link:
 NYTimes article
Editorial Observer; Interracialism Among the Jeffersons Went Well Beyond the Bedroom
NYTimes - over 14 years
Walk the grounds of Thomas Jefferson's Monticello around dawn (before the tourists come) and you enter a 19th-century landscape where you half expect to meet The Founder himself, out on one of those brisk constitutionals for which he was known. These paths and gardens were alive with Jefferson descendants last weekend, for a new version of a family
Article Link:
 NYTimes article
A Family Get-Together Of Historic Proportions
NYTimes - over 14 years
When they were young, their parents told them they were related to a famous man, a slave owner who became president. They called it a family secret, since outsiders would never believe that black children could be descendants of a president. But some did talk about that distant ancestor, Thomas Jefferson, and were laughed at or called liars by
Article Link:
 NYTimes article
A Mysterious Grave Haunts a Town
NYTimes - over 17 years
A tale of history tinged with mystery caught the attention of the Orange County, N.Y., hamlet of Southfields yesterday, as two amateur historians declared that in their midst (sort of) lay the bones (maybe) of a heretofore unknown descendant of Thomas Jefferson. The local newspaper, The Times Herald-Record of Middletown, announced on its front page
Article Link:
 NYTimes article
Jefferson's Descendants
NYTimes - almost 19 years
To the Editor: In ''Jefferson Table Extended for Hemingses'' (news article, May 17), you note that the descendants of two of Sally Hemings's sons, Thomas C. Woodson and Madison Hemings, are emphasizing how their family oral histories support their claim to be descendants of Ms. Hemings and Thomas Jefferson. Yet Madison Hemings wrote a memoir in
Article Link:
 NYTimes article
Jefferson Table Extended for Hemingses
NYTimes - almost 19 years
If descendants of Thomas Jefferson ever accept as their relatives people who claim as forebears Jefferson and Sally Hemings, one of his slaves, the first steps were taken this weekend, however small they were. As part of the Jefferson family's 86th reunion this weekend, his descendants, a group known as the Monticello Association, for the first
Article Link:
 NYTimes article
Jefferson's Kin Not Ready To Accept Tie to Slave
NYTimes - almost 19 years
For the first time in nearly 90 years, descendants of Thomas Jefferson today welcomed to their annual family reunion descendants of children who claimed to have Jefferson as their father and Sally Hemings, one of his slaves, as their mother. And for long, sunlit moments late this afternoon, the two groups lingered together here on the verdant lawns
Article Link:
 NYTimes article
Taking New Measurements for Jefferson's Pedestal
NYTimes - almost 19 years
In a room just across the road from Monticello, the hilltop mansion of Thomas Jefferson, a group of scholars struggled this weekend to understand the character of the third President now that it has taken on a dimension that historians almost unanimously denied for two centuries. Most people at the meeting agreed that DNA data reported last
Article Link:
 NYTimes article
Defenders of Jefferson Renew Attack on DNA Data Linking Him to Slave Child
NYTimes - about 19 years
DNA evidence of Thomas Jefferson's presumed affair with his slave Sally Hemings continues to reverberate, with defenders of Jefferson arguing that others in his family could have fathered her children. A DNA analysis of living descendants of Jefferson, reported last November, was interpreted to show that Jefferson had fathered at least one child
Article Link:
 NYTimes article
A Jeffersonian Lesson
NYTimes - over 19 years
To the Editor: Annette Gordon-Reed (Op-Ed, Nov. 3) argues that before the recent findings about Thomas Jefferson's descendants, many historians accepted the false historical accounts of Jefferson's grandchildren, ''despite the fact that their account was riddled with patent contradictions, wild lapses in logic and obvious falsehoods.'' Ms.
Article Link:
 NYTimes article
Looking Beyond Jefferson the Icon To a Man and His Slave Mistress
NYTimes - over 20 years
THOMAS JEFFERSON'S slave mistress is: 1) a figment of a disappointed office seeker's imagination; 2) a common assumption among blacks; 3) a convincing figure in a contrarian book by Fawn Brodie, a historian; 4) that saucy maid in the movie ''Jefferson in Paris''; 5) a historian's worst nightmare; 6) a fact. All of the above help shape the
Article Link:
 NYTimes article
A Question of Paternity
NYTimes - about 21 years
To the Editor: Naturally I was very pleased with Richard Brookhiser's review of my book ''The Long Affair: Thomas Jefferson and the French Revolution, 1785-1800'' (Nov. 17). There is, however, one correction I need to propose. Mr. Brookhiser writes, ''But the author weakens his point by slippery arguments of his own -- writing, in passing, that
Article Link:
 NYTimes article
CRITIC'S NOTEBOOK; 'Jefferson': Turning a Dubious Premise Into Fact
NYTimes - almost 23 years
Nobody is immune, it seems, to the politics of race and sex, not even the drafter of the Declaration of Independence and our third President, Thomas Jefferson. This, at least, seems to be one of the lessons of "Jefferson in Paris," the new movie by the celebrated team of Ismail Merchant, James Ivory and Ruth Prawer Jabhvala, which depicts scenes
Article Link:
 NYTimes article
FILM REVIEW; Jefferson's Entanglements, In History And in Love
NYTimes - almost 23 years
IN a leafy glade, Thomas Jefferson joins a group of French aristocrats as they coyly debate the merits of passion versus intellect. This is how "Jefferson in Paris," the most gilded Merchant-Ivory film yet, rearranges Jefferson's famous "My Head and My Heart" love letter into a battle of bons mots. Here and throughout the film, the effect is that
Article Link:
 NYTimes article
FILM VIEW; When Pols Didn't Worry About the 'Character Issue'
NYTimes - almost 23 years
EVEN AS POLITICS HAS COME to be dominated by tales of scandal and misconduct, so two projects (a film about to be released and one in the script stage) about long-dead leaders, Washington and Jefferson, will plunge us into the character issue of the 18th century -- at the risk of importing the intellectual vacuums of the 20th. "Jefferson in Paris"
Article Link:
 NYTimes article
'NONSENSE' ABOUT A JEFFERSON SLAVE MISTRESS
NYTimes - over 33 years
To the Editor: In his review of Nancy Caldwell Sorel's ''Ever Since Eve'' (May 9), Anatole Broyard quotes Miss Sorel as saying that Thomas Jefferson was one of those who ''behaved badly'' toward his ''illegitimate children,'' and that his case was complicated by the ''fact'' that the mother of the children was ''a black slave.'' Here again we
Article Link:
 NYTimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Madison Hemings
    LATE ADULTHOOD
  • 1877
    Age 72
    Died on November 28, 1877.
  • 1873
    Age 68
    In 1873, Madison used an Ohio newspaper interview, titled, "Life Among the Lowly," to address the Jefferson/Hemings controversy, where he stated that he did believe Jefferson was his father.
    More Details
    According to Madison's 1873 memoir, his older brother Beverley and his older sister Harriet moved to Washington D.C. in 1822 when they "ran away" from Monticello.
    More Details
    Madison grew up at Monticello. His surviving mixed-race siblings were an older brother Beverly and sister Harriet, and a younger brother Eston. According to his 1873 memoir, Madison was named for Jefferson's close friend and future president James Madison at the request of Madison's wife Dolley.
    More Details
  • FORTIES
  • 1852
    Age 47
    In 1852, Madison's brother, Eston, moved with his family away from Ohio (and his brother) to Madison, Wisconsin, to get further from possible danger due to passage of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850.
    More Details
  • THIRTIES
  • 1836
    Age 31
    In 1836 Madison, Mary and their infant daughter Sarah left Charlottesville for Pike County, Ohio, probably to join his brother Eston, who had already moved there with his own family.
    More Details
  • TWENTIES
  • 1835
    Age 30
    After Madison and his younger brother Eston were freed, they each worked and married, living with their families and mother Sally in Charlottesville until her death in 1835.
    More Details
  • 1831
    Age 26
    In September 1831, in his mid-twenties, Madison Hemings was described in a special census of the State of Virginia as being: 5"7 3/8 Inches high light complexion no scars or marks perceivable". Forty-two years later at the time of his interview, a journalist described him as "five feet ten inches in height, sparely made, with sandy complexion and a mild gray eye." In 1834 Madison wed Mary Hughes McCoy, a free woman of mixed-race ancestry (her grandfather Samuel Hughes, a white planter, freed her grandmother Chana from slavery and had children with her.) They had two children born in Virginia.
  • 1827
    Age 22
    As Jefferson did not free their wives and children, all were sold along with Monticello's nearly 130 other slaves at auctions in 1827 to settle the heavy debts against his estate.
    More Details
  • 1826
    Age 21
    Born into slavery by his mother's status, he was freed by the will of his master Thomas Jefferson in 1826.
    More Details
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1805
    Age 0
    Born on January 18, 1805.
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
None of the information offered by Spokeo is to be considered for purposes of determining or making a decision about a person's eligibility for credit, insurance, employment, housing (tenant screening), or for any other purposes covered under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA). Spokeo is not a consumer reporting agency and does not offer consumer reports. Spokeo gathers information from public sources, which may not be complete, comprehensive, accurate, or up-to-date, so do not use this service as a substitute for your own due diligence, especially if you have concerns about a person's criminal history. Spokeo does not verify or evaluate each piece of data, and makes no warranties or guarantees about any of the information offered.