Maria Callas

Greek soprano Maria Callas

Maria Callas, Commendatore OMRI was an American-born Greek soprano and one of the most renowned opera singers of the 20th century. She combined an impressive bel canto technique, a wide-ranging voice and great dramatic gifts. An extremely versatile singer, her repertoire ranged from classical opera seria to the bel canto operas of Donizetti, Bellini and Rossini; further, to the works of Verdi and Puccini; and, in her early career, to the music dramas of Wagner.
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Realising a vision - Gulf Daily News
Google News - over 6 years
And featured were the inventive and the creative: Bob Dylan, Maria Callas, Pablo Picasso, Frank Lloyd Wright and Martin Luther King. It was a statement of intent. He was going to make a computer business at home in this company: an icon,
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Metropolitan Opera's 2011-12 Season Opens With Anna Bolena 9/26 - Broadway World
Google News - over 6 years
... success when it premiered in 2009, has created a historically detailed setting for the opera, which re-emerged as a musical and dramatic showpiece for extraordinary sopranos when Maria Callas starred in the famous 1957 La Scala revival of the work
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Tyne Daly and Terrence McNally Talk Master Class on "Charlie Rose" (Video) - Playbill.com (blog)
Google News - over 6 years
Here, Tony and Emmy Award winner Tyne Daly, who stars in the production as Maria Callas, and Tony Award-winning playwright Terrence McNally discuss the play with Rose, which ends its Broadway run Sept. 4. Master Class plays at MTC's Samuel J. Friedman
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Defining the mystical gift of charisma - China Daily
Google News - over 6 years
On March 19, 1965, Maria Callas returned to the Metropolitan Opera after a seven-year absence. It was one of the most anticipated nights in Met history. The next day Harold Schonberg reported in The Times that Callas's first entrance set off a wave of
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A masterful look at Maria Callas at 2nd Story - Providence Journal
Google News - over 6 years
Gloria Crist as Maria Callas; in background, Jacqueline Pina as the second soprano, Sharon, in “Master Class” at 2nd Story Theatre. To some, Maria Callas was the last word in opera. But in Terrence McNally's loving, but unvarnished
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SNSD Yuri Evokes Classical Diva Maria Callas in Cosmopolitan Korea - Soompi
Google News - over 6 years
SNSD Yuri channels American-born Greek soprano and opera legend Maria Callas on a spread in Cosmopolitan Korea. The girl group member, who has been named as a “woman with superior genes,” shows off her charms evoking the romance and drama of a bygone
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A Gift From the Musical Gods - New York Times
Google News - over 6 years
ON Friday, March 19, 1965, Maria Callas returned to the Metropolitan Opera after a seven-year absence. The work was Puccini's “Tosca”; it was one of the most anticipated nights in Met history. Maria Callas performing in “Tosca” at the
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Tribute to Maria Callas, 1977 - WNYC (blog)
Google News - over 6 years
Tyne Daly appears in the Leonard Lopate Show this week to speak about her portrayal of legendary diva Maria Callas in Terrence McNally's Tony award-winning “Master Class.” Listen to this George Jellinek tribute to Callas in the WQXR show The Vocal
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'Master Class': Putting on a class act - Metro.us
Google News - over 6 years
Terrence McNally's two-act play imagines one of the sessions taught by acclaimed operatic soprano Maria Callas at Juilliard in the 1970s — although this show is not based on a literal recount of those seminars. Instead, Tony- and Emmy-winner Tyne Daly
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Tyne Daly is breathtaking in bringing Maria Callas to life - NorthJersey.com
Google News - over 6 years
The moment that Tyne Daly enters the room as Maria Callas in the revival of Terrence McNally's stirring "Master Class" at the Friedman Theater, you know immediately she owns the role. Tyne Daly as 'Maria Callas' instructs 'Sharon
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CRITIC'S NOTEBOOK; Broadway's Callas vs. Callas Herself
NYTimes - over 6 years
Terrence McNally's 1995 play, ''Master Class,'' was inspired by the now legendary master classes that Maria Callas gave during the 1971-72 academic year at the Juilliard School. There were 23 two-hour sessions in all, and Callas worked with 25 students whom she had selected after listening to some 300 young singers in auditions. But in the play,
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Broadway's Callas vs. Callas Herself - New York Times
Google News - over 6 years
Left, Tyne Daly as Maria Callas in "Master Class"; Maria Callas in an undated photo. More Photos » By ANTHONY TOMMASINI Terrence McNally's 1995 play, “Master Class,” was inspired by the now legendary master classes that Maria Callas gave during the
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An evening with La Divina - The Economist (blog)
Google News - over 6 years
Maria Callas could move an audience to weep by the second act. But her thrilling voice was controversial and short-lived. She performed her last opera in 1965, aged 41, and went on to teach at Julliard in the early 1970s—events that inspired Terrence
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Inside a Master Class: Breathe, Punctuate, Forget Led Zeppelin - New York Times
Google News - over 6 years
IN the Terrence McNally play “Master Class,” the opera diva Maria Callas (played by Tyne Daly) understands pedagogy to mean wiping the floor with young students' ambitions. The actor Raúl Esparza, left, teaching a master class in New
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From 'Master Class' to La Scala, she walks the line - phillyBurbs.com
Google News - over 6 years
The icon is Maria Callas, the heroic, or perhaps not so heroic, central figure in Terrence McNally's “Master Class,” currently in revival at the Manhattan Theater Club. In the role of opera star, teacher at Julliard, wife and mistress, Daly captures
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Tyne Daly earns an A + in Broadway's 'Master Class' - Zap2it.com (blog)
Google News - over 6 years
To play Maria Callas requires someone with magnificent presence, and whose attitude reminds us that art is as vital to our existence as oxygen. The role requires an actress who can sing, own the stage and make us feel as if we are
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Curtain Down, Heads Up: Readers Review 'Master Class' - New York Times (blog)
Google News - over 6 years
Sara Krulwich/The New York TimesTyne Daly as Maria Callas in the Broadway revival of “Master Class.” Terrence McNally's 1995 play “Master Class” imagines what happens when the opera diva Maria Callas leads an emotional master class ... - -
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Maria Callas
    CHILDHOOD
  • 1977
    Callas spent her last years living largely in isolation in Paris and died of a heart attack at age 53 on September 16, 1977.
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    Callas herself attributed her problems to a loss of confidence brought about by a loss of breath support, even though she does not make the connection between her weight and her breath support. In an April 1977 interview with journalist Philippe Caloni, she stated, My best recordings were made when I was skinny, and I say skinny, not slim, because I worked a lot and couldn't gain weight back; I became even too skinny...
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  • 1974
    Her final public performance was on November 11, 1974, in Sapporo, Japan.
  • 1973
    Callas staged a series of joint recitals in Europe in 1973 and in the U.S., South Korea, and Japan in 1974 with the tenor Giuseppe Di Stefano.
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  • 1971
    From October 1971 to March 1972, Callas gave a series of master classes at the Juilliard School in New York.
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  • 1969
    In 1969, the Italian filmmaker Pier Paolo Pasolini cast Callas in her only non-operatic acting role, as the Greek mythological character of Medea, in his film by that name.
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  • OTHER
  • 1968
    The relationship ended two years later in 1968, when Onassis left Callas in favor of Jacqueline Kennedy.
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  • 1966
    In 1966, Callas renounced her U.S. citizenship at the American Embassy in Paris, to facilitate the end of her marriage to Meneghini.
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  • 1964
    A live television transmission of act 2 of the Covent Garden Tosca of 1964 was broadcast in Britain on February 9, 1964, giving a rare view of Callas in performance and, specifically, of her on-stage collaboration with Tito Gobbi.
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    In her final years as a singer, she sang in Medea, Norma, and Tosca, most notably her Paris, New York, and London Toscas of January–February 1964, and her last performance on stage, on July 5, 1965, at Covent Garden.
  • 1960
    According to one of her biographers, Nicholas Gage, Callas and Onassis had a child, a boy, who died hours after he was born on March 30, 1960.
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  • 1959
    The affair that followed received much publicity in the popular press, and in November 1959, Callas left her husband.
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    Despite this, Bing's admiration for Callas never wavered, and in September 1959, he sneaked into La Scala in order to listen to Callas record La Gioconda for EMI.
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  • 1958
    Callas's relationship with La Scala had also started to become strained after the Edinburgh incident, and this effectively severed her major ties with her artistic home. Later in 1958, Callas and Rudolf Bing were in discussion about her season at the Met.
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    In January 1958, Callas was to open the Rome Opera House season with Norma, with Italy's president, Giovanni Gronchi, in attendance.
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    She further consolidated this company's standing when, in 1958, she gave "a towering performance as Violetta in La traviata, and that same year, in her only American performances of Medea, gave an interpretation of the title role worthy of Euripides."
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  • 1957
    In 1957, while still married to husband Giovanni Battista Meneghini, Callas was introduced to Greek shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis at a party given in her honor by Elsa Maxwell after a performance in Donizetti's Anna Bolena.
    In 1957, Callas was starring as Amina in La sonnambula at the Edinburgh International Festival with the forces of La Scala.
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  • 1956
    The latter half of Callas's career was marked by a number of scandals. Following a performance of Madama Butterfly in Chicago in 1956, Callas was confronted by a process server who handed her papers about a lawsuit brought by Eddy Bagarozy, who claimed he was her agent.
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    Her Metropolitan Opera debut, opening the Met's seventy-second season on October 29, 1956, was again with Norma, but was preceded with an unflattering cover story in Time magazine, which rehashed all of the Callas clichés, including her temper, her supposed rivalry with Renata Tebaldi and especially her difficult relationship with her mother.
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    Callas's relationship with Evangelia continued to erode during the years in Greece, and in the prime of her career, it became a matter of great public interest, especially after a 1956 cover story in Time magazine which focused on this relationship and later, by Evangelia's book My Daughter – Maria Callas.
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  • 1954
    He felt that her drastic weight loss in 1954 further contributed to reduced physical support of her voice.
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    Many of her most critically acclaimed appearances are from the period 1954–1958 (Norma, La traviata, Sonnambula and Lucia of 1955, Anna Bolena of 1957, Medea of 1958, to name a few).
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    There were others, however, who felt that the voice had benefitted from the weight loss. Of her performance of Norma in Chicago in 1954, Claudia Cassidy wrote that "there is a slight unsteadiness in some of the sustained upper notes, but to me her voice is more beautiful in color, more even through the range, than it used to be".
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    Walter Legge, who produced nearly all of Callas's EMI/Angel recordings, states that Callas "ran into a patch of vocal difficulties as early as 1954": during the recording of La forza del destino, done immediately after the weight loss, the "wobble had become so pronounced" that he told Callas they "would have to give away seasickness pills with every side".
    In recordings from 1954 (immediately after her 80-pound weight loss) and thereafter, "not only would the instrument lose its warmth and become thin and acidulous, but the altitudinous passages would to her no longer come easily."
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    Her debut in America was five years later in Chicago in 1954, and "with the Callas Norma, Lyric Opera of Chicago was born."
    Callas was notably instrumental in arranging Franco Corelli's debut at La Scala in 1954, where he sang Licinio in Spontini's La vestale opposite Callas's Julia.
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  • 1953
    Callas and the London public had what she herself called "a love affair", and she returned to the Royal Opera House in 1953, 1957, 1958, 1959, and 1964 to 1965.
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  • 1952
    Of her December 1952 Lady Macbeth—coming after five years of singing the most strenuous dramatic soprano repertoire—Peter Dragadze wrote for Opera, "Callas's voice since last season has improved a great deal, the second passagio on the high B-natural and C has now completely cleared, giving her an equally colored scale from top to bottom."
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    Callas in Norma in 1952 was a shock, a wonderful shock.
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    In 1952, she made her London debut at the Royal Opera House in Norma with veteran mezzo-soprano Ebe Stignani as Adalgisa, a performance which survives on record and also features the young Joan Sutherland in the small role of Clotilde.
  • 1951
    However, as Callas's fame grew, and especially after her great success in I vespri siciliani in Florence, Ghiringhelli had to relent: Callas made her official debut at La Scala in Verdi's I vespri siciliani on opening night in December 1951, and this theatre became her artistic home throughout the 1950s.
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    In 1951, Tebaldi and Maria Callas were jointly booked for a vocal recital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
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    After her June 11, 1951, concert in Florence, Rock Ferris of Musical Courier said, "Her high E's and F's are taken full voice."
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    However, in his review of Callas's 1951 live recording of I vespri siciliani, Ira Siff writes, "Accepted wisdom tells us that Callas possessed, even early on, a flawed voice, unattractive by conventional standards—an instrument that signaled from the beginning vocal problems to come.
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    Sir Rudolf Bing, who remembered Callas as being "monstrously fat" in 1951, stated that after the weight loss, Callas was an "astonishing, svelte, striking woman" who "showed none of the signs one usually finds in a fat woman who has lost weight: she looked as though she had been born to that slender and graceful figure, and had always moved with that elegance."
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    Although by 1951, Callas had sung at all the major theatres in Italy, she had not yet made her official debut at Italy's most prestigious opera house, Teatro alla Scala in Milan.
  • 1950
    According to composer Gian Carlo Menotti, Callas had substituted for Renata Tebaldi in the role of Aida in 1950, and La Scala's general manager, Antonio Ghiringhelli, had taken an immediate dislike to Callas.
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  • 1949
    The night of the day she married Meneghini in Verona, she sailed for Argentina to sing at the Teatro Colón in Buenos Aires. Callas made her South American debut in Buenos Aires on May 20, 1949, during the European summer opera recess.
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    The great turning point in Callas's career occurred in Venice in 1949.
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    Upon her arrival in Verona, Callas met, an older, wealthy industrialist, who began courting her. They married in 1949, and he assumed control of her career until 1959, when the marriage dissolved.
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  • 1946
    Louise Caselotti, who worked with Callas in 1946 and 1947, prior to her Italian debut, felt that it was not the heavy roles that hurt Callas's voice, but the lighter ones.
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    In 1946, Callas was engaged to re-open the opera house in Chicago as Turandot, but the company folded before opening.
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  • 1945
    After returning to the United States and reuniting with her father in September 1945, Callas made the round of auditions.
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    When she left Greece on September 14, 1945, two months short of her 22nd birthday, Callas had given 56 performances in seven operas and had appeared in around 20 recitals.
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  • 1944
    During August and September 1944, Callas performed the role of Leonore in a Greek language production of Fidelio, again at the Odeon of Herodes Atticus.
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  • 1942
    Despite these hostilities, Callas managed to continue and made her debut in a leading role in August 1942 as Tosca, going on to sing the role of Marta in Eugen d'Albert's Tiefland at the Olympia Theatre.
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  • 1941
    Callas made her professional debut in February 1941, in the small role of Beatrice in Franz von Suppé's Boccaccio.
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  • 1939
    On April 2, 1939, Callas undertook the part of Santuzza in a student production of Mascagni's Cavalleria rusticana at the Olympia Theatre, and in the fall of the same year she enrolled at the Athens Conservatoire in Elvira de Hidalgo's class.
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  • 1938
    On April 11, 1938, in her public debut, Callas ended the recital of Trivella's class at the Parnassos music hall with a duet from Tosca.
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  • 1937
    In the summer of 1937, her mother visited Maria Trivella at the younger Greek National Conservatoire, asking her to take Mary, as she was then called, as a student for a modest fee.
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    The marriage continued to deteriorate and in 1937 Evangelia decided to return to Athens with her two daughters.
  • 1923
    According to her birth certificate, Maria Callas was born Sophia Cecelia Kalos at Flower Hospital (now the Terence Cardinal Cooke Health Care Center), at 1249 Fifth Avenue in Manhattan, on December 2, 1923, to Greek parents George Kalogeropoulos (c. 1881-1972) and Evangelia "Litsa" (sometimes "Litza") Dimitriadou (c. 1894-1982), though she was christened Anna Maria Sofia Cecilia Kalogeropoulou —the genitive of the patronymic Kalogeropoulos.
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