Norma Shearer

Actress Norma Shearer

Edith Norma Shearer was a Canadian actress. Shearer was one of the most popular actresses in North America from the mid-1920s through the 1930s. Her early films cast her as the girl-next-door but for most of the Pre-Code film era beginning with the 1930 film The Divorcee, for which she won an Oscar for Best Actress, she played sexually liberated women in sophisticated contemporary comedies. Later she appeared in historical and period films.
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Biography
Norma Shearer's personal information overview.
Deceased
12 June 1983

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Classic Liz Taylor, Lucille Ball titles released - phillyBurbs.com
Google News - over 6 years
Shakespeare: “A Midsummer Night's Dream” (1935) with James Cagney, Olivia de Havilland and Mickey Rooney; “Romeo and Juliet” (1936) with Norma Shearer and Leslie Howard; “Othello” (1965) with Laurence Olivier and Maggie Smith; and “Antony and
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So good at playing bad, TCM explores career of German actor Conrad Veidt Aug. 23 - Examiner.com
Google News - over 6 years
1940's Escape, which co-stars Robert Young and Norma Shearer, is one of those films. TCM will include it in their tribute to Veidt at 4:15pm/3:15c. Achieving success in films produced in Britain and jointly produced by the US, Veidt tried his hand at
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Five most needless remakes of movies - Daily Herald
Google News - over 6 years
Sure, it had an all-female cast of solid actresses (Meg Ryan, Annette Bening, Cloris Leachman), as did the original, though perhaps not quite the stellar collection that included Norma Shearer, Joan Crawford and Rosalind Russell
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Five of the most needless movie remakes - Florida Today
Google News - over 6 years
Sure, it had an all-female cast of solid actresses (Meg Ryan, Annette Bening, Cloris Leachman), as did the original, though perhaps not quite the stellar collection that included Norma Shearer, Joan Crawford and Rosalind Russell
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Five most needless film remakes - Chicago Sun-Times
Google News - over 6 years
Sure, it had an all-female cast of solid actresses (Meg Ryan, Annette Bening, Cloris Leachman), as did the original, though perhaps not quite the stellar collection that included Norma Shearer, Joan Crawford and Rosalind Russell
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Lon Chaney Movie Schedule: THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA, TELL IT TO THE MARINES ... - Alt Film Guide (blog)
Google News - over 6 years
The other four were Lillian Gish, Ramon Novarro, Norma Shearer, and John Gilbert. In August 1926, Chaney, Novarro, and Gilbert were each making $3000 a week (approximately $37000 today); Norma Shearer was making $2000. Lillian Gish, under a special
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The almanac - UPI.com
Google News - over 6 years
They include Edmund Jennings Randolph, the first US attorney general, in 1753; Herbert Hoover, 31st president of the United States, in 1874; actors Jack Haley in 1898, Norma Shearer in 1902, Noah Beery Jr. in 1913 and Rhonda Fleming in 1923 (age 88);
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Submit this story - Huffington Post
Google News - over 6 years
Stars from the silent era included Lon Chaney, Marlene Dietrich, Douglas Fairbanks, John Gilbert, Louise Dresser, and Norma Shearer. The depth and breadth of the festival's offerings, from orphaned films to early Disney "Laugh-O-Grams" (as well as
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Star maker: the photographer Ruth Harriet Louise - Telegraph.co.uk
Google News - over 6 years
Her roll-call of stars included Crawford, Greta Garbo, Norma Shearer and Buster Keaton. She helped shape Garbo's image and captured Crawford's transformation from young chorus girl to Hollywood star. Her portraits could even make or break careers as
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DVD recommendation: 'The kid stays in the picture' - IBNLive.com
Google News - over 6 years
Yet he stepped into Hollywood quite by chance, discovered by actress Norma Shearer by a hotel swimming pool. Shearer spotted a spark in the good-looking go-getter and asked Evans to play her husband Irving Thalberg in Man of a Thousand Faces
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Making magic in the backlot - Bay Area Reporter
Google News - over 6 years
A picture of the directory shows the locations of those occupied by Crawford, Norma Shearer, Greta Garbo, Jeannette MacDonald, Myrna Loy, and Luise Ranier. Robert Taylor is photographed relaxing in his suite. His neighbors were Clark Gable,
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Sony's Remake of Studio System
NYTimes - over 6 years
LOS ANGELES -- If Louis B. Mayer haunts the Irving Thalberg Building, once his seat of power at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, he may recognize more than the walnut walls. The building is now the home of Sony Pictures Entertainment, and there are signs that Mayer's old studio system is being revived. As Hollywood has backed away from movie stars as too
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Sony, Like Old Hollywood, Banks on Familiar Faces - New York Times
Google News - over 6 years
... thanks to personal relationships and shared tastes that have largely supplanted the rigid contractual arrangements that allowed Mayer to build an empire around the likes of Norma Shearer, Greta Garbo, Lionel Barrymore and Clark Gable
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“HE WHO GETS SLAPPED” – A conversation with composer and pianist Matti Bye - SanFranciscoSentinel.com
Google News - over 6 years
The young romantic leads go to John Gilbert and Norma Shearer – each will be catapulted to the top of Hollywood's A-List of Box Office favorites. It is the dawn of a new era in filmmaking. Art – as in, “Art for Art's Sake”, the MGM logo – has joined
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SF Silent Film Festival: early Marlene Dietrich - San Francisco Chronicle
Google News - over 6 years
(7 pm today) -- The closing night film, "He Who Gets Slapped," stars Lon Chaney as a sad circus clown befriended by a beautiful horseback rider (the great Norma Shearer). This is the first American film by the Swedish director Victor Sjöström,
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Silent Film Festival - SFStation.com
Google News - over 6 years
Norma Shearer attempts to give him a reason to love again. Directed by Victor Sjöström, master of the match-dissolve, where scenes overlap to interesting effect. Accompanied by the Matti Bye Ensemble (7/17, 7:30 pm)
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Norma Shearer
    LATE ADULTHOOD
  • 1983
    Age 80
    On June 12, 1983, Shearer died of bronchial pneumonia at the Motion Picture Country Home in Woodland Hills, California, where she had been living since 1980.
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  • FIFTIES
  • 1960
    Age 57
    In 1960, her secretary stated: "Miss Shearer does not want any publicity.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1942
    Age 39
    Following her retirement in 1942, she married Martin Arrougé (March 23, 1914 – August 8, 1999), a former ski instructor 10 years her junior.
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    In 1942, Shearer unofficially retired from acting.
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  • 1939
    Age 36
    In 1939, she attempted an unusual role in the dark comedy Idiot's Delight, adapted from the 1936 Robert E. Sherwood play.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1931
    Age 28
    She was nominated the same year for Their Own Desire, for A Free Soul in 1931, The Barretts of Wimpole Street in 1934, Romeo and Juliet in 1936, and Marie Antoinette in 1938.
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  • 1930
    Age 27
    Shearer was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress on six occasions, winning only for The Divorcee in 1930.
    She was nominated six times for the Academy Award for Best Actress and won once, for her performance in the 1930 film The Divorcee.
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  • 1927
    Age 24
    On September 29, 1927, they were married in the Hollywood wedding of the year.
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    By 1927, Shearer had made a total of 13 silent films for MGM.
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  • 1925
    Age 22
    At the end of a working day in July 1925, Shearer received a phone call from Thalberg's secretary, asking if she would like to accompany Thalberg to the premiere of Chaplin's The Gold Rush.
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    By late 1925, she was carrying her own films, and was one of MGM's biggest attractions, a bona fide star.
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  • 1923
    Age 20
    Irving Thalberg had moved to Louis B. Mayer Pictures as vice president on February 15, 1923, but had already sent a telegram to Shearer's agent, inviting her to come to the studio.
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    In January 1923, Shearer received an offer from Louis B. Mayer Pictures, a studio in Northeast Los Angeles that was run by a small-time producer, Louis B. Mayer.
  • TEENAGE
  • 1920
    Age 17
    In January 1920, the three Shearer women arrived in New York, each of them dressed up for the occasion. "I had my hair in little curls," Shearer remembered, "and I felt very ambitious and proud."
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  • 1918
    Age 15
    The childhood and adolescence that Shearer once described as "a pleasant dream" ended in 1918, when her father's company collapsed and older sister, Athole, suffered her first serious mental breakdown.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1902
    Born
    Born on August 11, 1902.
Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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