Rod Steiger

Actor Rod Steiger

Rodney Stephen "Rod" Steiger was an Academy Award-winning American actor known for his performances in such films as On the Waterfront, The Big Knife, Oklahoma!, The Harder They Fall, Across the Bridge, The Pawnbroker, Doctor Zhivago, In the Heat of the Night, and Waterloo as well as the television programs Marty and Jesus of Nazareth.
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Oscar-Winning Cinematographer Haskell Wexler Dies At 93
Huffington Post - about 2 years
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Haskell Wexler, one of Hollywood's most famous and honored cinematographers and one whose innovative approach helped him win Oscars for "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" and the Woody Guthrie biopic "Bound for Glory," died Sunday. He was 93. Wexler died peacefully in his sleep, his son, Oscar-nominated sound man Jeff Wexler, told The Associated Press. A liberal activist, Wexler photographed some of the most socially relevant and influential films of the 1960s and 1970s, including the Jane Fonda-Jon Voight anti-war classic, "Coming Home," the Sidney Poitier-Rod Steiger racial drama "In the Heat of the Night" and the Oscar-winning adaptation of Ken Kesey's "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest." He was also the rare cinematographer known enough to the general public to receive a star on Hollywood's Walk of Fame. "He was a wonderful father. I owe most of who I am to his wisdom and guidance," said his son, nominated for Oscars himself for "Independence Day" ...
Article Link:
 Huffington Post article
The International Press Academy Names Ellen Burstyn And Martyn Burke To Receive Major Honors
Yahoo News - about 3 years
LOS ANGELES, Feb. 3, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Legendary actress Ellen Burstyn and journalist/ novelist/ director Martyn Burke will be on-hand to receive the most prestigious honors bestowed by the International Press Academy, the largest group of entertainment journalists to recognize accomplishments in the film, television and digital entertainment industry. Ellen Burstyn will join the ranks of Rod Steiger, Susan Sarandon, Gena Rowlands, Mitzi Gaynor, Martin Landau, Kathy Bates, Michael York, Terence Stamp, Mike Medavoy and others to receive one of the IPA's highest honors, the Mary Pickford Award for her outstanding artistic contribution to the entertainment industry.
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 Yahoo News article
Nina Castelnuovo's Times Photo
Huffington Post - about 4 years
Nina Castelnuovo's photograph of a faceless 28-year-old Tel Aviv woman, which accompanied the New York Times front page story "In Israel, A Push to Test For Cancer Gene Leaves Many Conflicted" (NYT, 11/26/13) presents the viewer with a congeries of troubling emotions. It's an iconic photo that goes beyond the substance of the article itself. The woman in the photo has pulled down the strap of her blouse to reveal the scar on her breast, where ostensibly a lump had been removed. But the breast is still defiantly intact and there is even the insinuation of the aureole. Above the incision is a tattoo of a Jewish star. The shot recalls a l964 film called The Pawnbroker in which a woman walks into Rod Steiger's shop and pulls up her blouse in order to get what she wants. The effect of the Times image is a little like that in The Pawnbroker. Steiger, who plays a refugee who'd spent time in a concentration camp, is immediately flooded with memories, just as the reader of the Times story...
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 Huffington Post article
David S. Simon: The Loan Arranger
Huffington Post - over 4 years
I used to joke that Bernie Madoff was "The Man of Steal" but my newest title pun is the above and after watching Disney take a $150 million bath, I gotta say I have mixed feelings about it. Being a baby that once upon a time went boom, I grew up on "The Lone Ranger" and while I could never figure out why he had to tilt back his horse in the beginning of the show (did he run out of room?), the idea of silver bullets, a faithful Indian companion, the white hat, the cool tight like tights outfit and that Zorro mask just made the whole thing five-year old cool. These guys never seemed to have to shower or eat. They seemed to run on pure high-octane heroism. And by virtue of the fact that every dame in the west batted her eyes at the Lone Ranger, he, and for that matter, his horse, Silver, emitted no western odor. This was the life! You got to sleep by a camp fire, never deal with snow (I lived in NY) or scalding summers (the man literally had no seasonal reason for ever hav...
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 Huffington Post article
Jay Weston: Sidney Poitier's New Novel Is Superb!
Huffington Post - over 4 years
I read two books by famous show business personalities this weekend. One was a first novel by Sidney Poitier, Montaro Caine, while the other was a memoir, The Friedkin Connection, by film director William Friedkin. For various reasons, I have chosen to do a full review of only one of them, Sidney's novel, although I am also recommending Billy's searingly honest memoir, if only for its depiction of how he managed to make two of the most enduring films of our time, The French Connection and The Exorcist. I have had two incidents working with him of films not getting made (Judgement Day with Gregory Peck and The Hostages), which I might have had to recount in detail if I did a review, so I took the advice of a dear friend and deferred in that respect. After all, he is happily married to one of the great women of our world, the beautiful Sherry Lansing. (And I happened to have been at Richard Cohen's Oscar-viewing party where they met some 25 years ago. She said to him,...
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 Huffington Post article
John Farr: Dressing Up: The 10 Best Period Costume Movies
Huffington Post - almost 5 years
One of the singular joys of living in New York City is The Metropolitan Museum of Art, conveniently situated right across the Park from us. I was reminded of this on Wednesday when I attended their "Impressionism, Fashion, and Modernity" exhibition. Combining artwork and costumes, it showed how the finest French impressionist painters of the late-19th century were celebrating Paris as the epicenter of style and fashion in their work, by painting not just glorious gardens and vistas, but the colorful, elaborate outfits worn by the city's most prominent women. Admittedly, I'm a sucker for the Impressionists. Were I Bill Gates, I'd be snapping up any Monet or Renoir I could lay my hands on. And though you won't see me at any "Fashion Week" events, I also love and revere timeless fashion and style, by which I mean: a) Clean styles, cuts and color sense that worked in 1930, and will work in 2030. b) Fashions from the past -- say, two centuries (I'm less inte...
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 Huffington Post article
Dr. Franklin Ruehl, Ph.D.: Two More Starlets Who Met Tragic Demises!
Huffington Post - almost 5 years
Noted TV actress Inger Stevens and silent screen star Martha Mansfield are two female thespians who suffered tragic, premature deaths! Inger Stevens (1934-1970): This Swedish blue-eyed blonde captivator (born Inger Stensland in Stockholm) starred in the doomsday epic, The World, The Flesh, And The Devil(1959), as Sarah Crandall, the survivor of a nuclear holocaust. A white racist (Mel Ferrer, who was a pianist with new hands in 1967's The Hands of Orlac) and a miner (Harry Belafonte, who was a Jewish angel named Alex Levine in 1970 The Angel Levine) joined her as the only other surviving humans on the planet. This dark, apocalyptic work had a surprise ending: after it appeared certain that one of the men would kill the other as they hunted each other through Manhattan's deserted canyons, the trio wound up skipping off hand-in-hand, determined to make the best of what fate had offered them. Of course, Inger is best remembered for two superb 1960 episodes of The Twilight ...
Article Link:
 Huffington Post article
Jay Weston: Mamet's American Buffalo Opens at the Geffen Playhouse!
Huffington Post - almost 5 years
About two weeks ago I wrote a rather scathing, almost angry review on Huffington about David Mamet's HBO film, which he wrote and directed, on the possible murder of an actress by music mogul Phil Spector. Angry, yes, because I know how good Mamet can be when he's cooking on all cylinders. You see, many years ago, in late October of 1983, I reviewed a Broadway production of David Mamet's American Buffalo with Al Pacino and said that this play was an absolute masterpiece and Mamet was the greatest living American playwright. (Sorry, Edward Albee, but I still think it was true.) That was a revival of an off-Broadway show I had first seen several years earlier, which knocked me off my feet. Mamet has said of writing it: I used to spend a lot of time with hustlers and thieves. A play set among them is, like a play set among the super-rich, in politics, or among kings and queens, or in Oz, a device which lets us participate fully. it means, 'once upon a time.' On Wednesday...
Article Link:
 Huffington Post article
Kim Morgan: Three Favorite Oscar Moments
Huffington Post - almost 5 years
The Academy Awards -- one of cinema's most supreme accolades (or so they tell us). So prestigious that, as many filmmakers and actors claim, it's an "honor" just to be nominated. A gift from your peers, a historic milestone, a career changer, an... oh... where's Sacheen Littlefeather? I like Oscars that go a little crazy. And not in those golly-gee speeches where someone -- say, Anne Hathaway (the inevitable winner Sunday) -- reacts with such feigned shock that she giddily exhibits an actorly, cute-as-a-button manic depressive episode, stuttering out names that reveal how kooky, sweet, humbled and... enough, Ms. Hathaway. You're an actress so I do respect you for using your craft on the podium. I expect it. And I like you, Anne (I really like you!), I do. Actually, come to think of it, I hope you pull a Greer Garson five and a half-minute gusher. That would be entertaining. But that won't happen, so... bring me Joan Crawford! Bring me Joan Crawford in bed, accpeting her go...
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 Huffington Post article
Bryan Cranston: 'I had to take my character from Mr Chips to Scarface'
Guardian (UK) - over 5 years
Bryan Cranston was a jobbing actor for years… then came the role of a lifetime in Breaking Bad and three successive Emmy wins. Here he tells us how being TV's chemistry teacher/drug baron Walter White changed his life There are some actors' names – Errol Flynn, Marlon Brando, Johnny Depp – which, even if they were not famous, would still evoke images of romance, danger, drama. Then there is Bryan Cranston. It's hard to conceive of a more prosaic appellation. It's almost perfectly anonymous. Authentic but dully inconspicuous, it's a background kind of name. A solid name for a solid character actor. Which is what Cranston was for almost three decades. On film and on television, he was repeatedly to be found in supporting roles, slowly building a reputation as a reliable and flexible performer who was equally adept in comedy and drama. Always in employment, he would crop up in shows such as Baywatch, Murder, She Wrote, LA Law and in minor parts in forgotten films such as Amazon Women ...
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 Guardian (UK) article
Jay Weston: Romantic Madame Butterfly Coming to L.A. Opera
Huffington Post - over 5 years
I admit it, I am an utter romantic. Now, before, forever. I am a sucker for a great love story, either in the movies, the opera, the stage, or in real life. As a filmmaker, I have tried to inject that romantic element in all of the movies that I have produced, so when Billie Holiday met Louis McKay in Lady Sings The Blues, we interjected the scene where a flapper-clad Diana Ross as Billie steps into a dark night club and sees the white-suited Billy Dee Williams looking like a dark Clark Gable... and everyone swooned in the theatres when it played. Even the curmudgeon comic, W.C. Fields (Rod Steiger), softens when he first meets Carlotta Monti (Valerie Perrine), who will become his loving mistress for the rest of his life. We added a scene in Chasen's nightclub where he finally has to admit (to himself as well as to her) that he has fallen in love. When I produced a Broadway play, Does a Tiger Wear a Necktie?, starring the then-unknown Al Pacino, I begged the playwright,...
Article Link:
 Huffington Post article
Jay Weston: Charlie Chaplin's Limelight at the Academy After 60 Years
Huffington Post - over 5 years
Romantic, musical, emotional, a truly great film, and here is the inside story! In 1952 I was drafted into the U.S. Army and went off to fight a violent little-known war in a far-off land called Korea, serving there for two years as a war correspondent and newspaper editor. I came home a more experienced, weary and wary young man. And in 1952 the legendary comic genius, Charlie Chaplin, made a hauntingly beautiful masterpiece of a movie called Limelight, and then he was thrown out of the United States by a bigoted, ignorant and sadistic right-wing political element (the 'Tea Party' of the time), suspected of being "a communist," which he never was. In fact, according to his co-star Norman Lloyd, as reported in the Los Angeles Times, when producer Samuel Goldwyn heard that Chaplin was being called a communist he scoffed and said, "He is the only true capitalist that I know." The L.A. Times noted that Chaplin had incurred the wrath of J. Edgar Hoover, the then head of ...
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 Huffington Post article
'In the Heat of the Night': 25 Things You Didn't Know About the Sidney Poitier Classic
Moviefone Blog - over 5 years
They called it the "Slap Heard 'Round the World." It happened partway through "In the Heat of the Night" -- a movie released at the height of racial tensions during the Civil Rights Era exactly 45 years ago (on August 2, 1967) -- in a scene where a bigoted Southern cotton plantation owner slaps Sidney Poitier (and Poitier slaps back just as hard). Years of deferential behavior, both from Poitier in saintly role-model performances, and from every black actor ever to perform in a Hollywood movie, halted with a mighty thwack. It's one of the most memorable moments in film history and helped earn "In the Heat of the Night" the Best Picture Oscar that year. Even today, the scene remains brutally effective, a reminder of how much has changed in 45 years, and how much has not. The film -- in which a racist Southern sheriff (Rod Steiger) and a haughty black police detective from the Northeast (Poitier) develop a grudging mutual respect as they cooperate to solve a murder in a sultry Mississ...
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 Moviefone Blog article
Was This the Most Dangerous Film in American History?
The New Republic - over 5 years
One of the puzzles facing the film historian (amateur or professional) occurs when a child climbs upon the parental knee and asks, “Well, Dad, what was the black list?” The parent struggles to explain that, once upon a nervous time, the Hollywood movie was said to be rife with un-American suggestions and the energetic insinuation of socialist alternatives. The child blinks, and says, “Father, isn’t that preposterous? Can’t anyone see that the entertainment movie was hysterically dedicated to the American ‘way,’ and given over to the sturdy mythology of courage, honor, manliness, happiness, and having your heart in the right place, where the brain was meant to be?” The father blinks: Is it just his customary paranoia, or could it be that his own child’s articulation hints at some body-snatching invasion? So the father struggles to recall one film—any film—that might have been thrown like acid at the solemn, fearful mindlessness of American society. It’s not easy, but then he is res...
Article Link:
 The New Republic article
Sam Weller: Remembering Ray Bradbury
Huffington Post - over 5 years
There, on a gracious green corner lot in West Los Angeles, where the mature palm trees rustle in the night wind and beads of dew gather on the ice plant, you can't miss it. The house. Even in the moonlight, the color, is unmistakable. The big, rambling house, is painted dandelion yellow. The lights are dark now. For the first time in more than a half-century. The Bradbury family moved in on Thanksgiving Day, 1958 and there has always been motion and commotion and activity ever since. A Dixieland jazz band plays on a small balcony on Halloween night. Actor Rod Steiger drives by in a brand new luxury convertible and screams, "Eat your heart out!" Visitors walk up the flagstone steps: actors and film directors and writers and famed animators and friends and loved ones and family and, of course, the four children. Four beloved daughters raised in the home. Four girls who played and schooled and grew there. And when they were young, their father told them bedtime st...
Article Link:
 Huffington Post article
Ernest Borgnine dead at 95
LATimes - over 5 years
Ernest Borgnine, the beefy screen star known for blustery, often villainous roles but who won the lead-actor Oscar for playing against type as a lovesick butcher in 1955's “Marty,” died Sunday. He was 95. His longtime spokesman, Harry Flynn, told the Associated Press that Borgnine died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center with his family by his side. Television fans loved Borgnine as the scheming Navy officer in the sitcom “McHale's Navy.” Borgnine was also known as the heavy who beats up Frank Sinatra in “From Here to Eternity,” and one of the thugs who menaces Spencer Tracy in “Bad Day at Block Rock.” Then came “Marty,” a low-budget film based on a Paddy Chayefsky television play that starred Rod Steiger. Borgnine played a 34-year-old who fears he is so unattractive he will never find romance. Then, at a dance, he meets a girl with the same fear. “Sooner or later, there comes a point in a man's life when he's gotta face some facts,” Marty movingly tells his mother at one point in...
Article Link:
 LATimes article
Major Nidal Hasan’s Beard
FrontPageMag.com - over 5 years
This week military judge Gregory Gross barred Major Nidal Malik Hasan from appearing in court because he has refused to shave a beard he reportedly grew as a badge of his deep Islamic faith. The beard, judge Gross said, was a violation of Army policy. As it happens, so were Hasan’s actions in November of 2009 at Fort Hood, Texas. As one of the early press accounts noted, Major Hassan packed a revolver and an FN Herstal pistol, and stuffed the cargo pockets of his camouflage pants full of 20-round ammunition clips. Then he opened fire on U.S. Army soldiers while shouting “Allahu akbar,” or “Allah is great.” In a matter of minutes Hassan, a U.S. Army psychiatrist trained to help soldiers deal with the horrors of war, had killed thirteen and wounded thirty. He was methodical, aiming carefully at those seeking cover. Kimberly Munley, a police officer married to a Fort Hood soldier, saw Major Hasan chasing a wounded soldier across a courtyard and opened fire on Hasan. He returned fire ...
Article Link:
 FrontPageMag.com article
Ray Bradbury was a huge influence on the film world too
LATimes - over 5 years
The death of Ray Bradbury Tuesday night at the age of 91 throws into relief not only his literary legacy but his abundant influence on the movie world. Starting with the Jack Arnold-directed "It Came From Outer Space," about the crash-landing of a mysterious craft in the Arizona desert, in 1953, Bradbury's work has formed the basis of numerous films. Rod Steiger starred in a 1969 adaptation of his futuristic short-story collection "The Illustrated Man." In 1983, Jason Robards took on Bradbury's horror novel, "Something Wicked This Way Comes," about a pair of teenage boys who experience nightmares when a carnival comes to town. PHOTOS: Ray Bradbury | 1920 - 2012 And in perhaps the most notable big-screen spin on Bradbury's work, French New Wave pioneer Francois Truffaut helmed a version of Bradbury's dystopian book-burning classic "Fahrenheit 451" in 1966. Bradbury's stories and novels also yielded many television adaptations, with the author also writing and creating the c...
Article Link:
 LATimes article
Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Rod Steiger
    LATE ADULTHOOD
  • 2002
    Age 76
    He died of pneumonia and complications from surgery for a gall bladder tumor on July 9, 2002, aged 77, in Los Angeles, and was survived by his fifth wife Joan Benedict Steiger.
    Steiger died of pneumonia and complications from surgery for a gall bladder tumor on July 9, 2002, in Los Angeles, and was buried in Forest Lawn – Hollywood Hills Cemetery.
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  • 1999
    Age 73
    Steiger played judges in Antonio Banderas's comedy-drama Crazy in Alabama and in the prison drama, The Hurricane, both in 1999, the latter of which tells the story of former middleweight boxer Rubin Carter, who was wrongly convicted of a triple homicide in a bar in Paterson, New Jersey.
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    Steiger also responded unfavorably when he learned that Kazan had been awarded an honorary Oscar by the Academy in 1999.
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  • 1998
    Age 72
    It has since been acclaimed as one of the greatest films ever made, and in 1998 was selected as the 39th best American film in the original AFI's 100 Years 100 Movies list by the American Film Institute.
  • 1997
    Age 71
    In 1997, Steiger played Tony Vago, the mob boss of Vincent Gallo's character in Kiefer Sutherland's Truth or Consequences, N.M., a gritty noir about a drug heist gone wrong.
  • 1996
    Age 70
    Also in 1996, Steiger played a "jingoistic top general" who "petitions the president to go nuclear in the middle of a global crisis" in the ensemble production of Mars Attacks!
  • 1993
    Age 67
    In 1993, Steiger portrayed an aging gynaecologist who terrorizes his urban neighbors in a rural community in Burlington, Vermont in The Neighbor.
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  • 1990
    Age 64
    In 1990, Steiger starred in Men of Respect, a crime drama film adaptation of William Shakespeare's play Macbeth.
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  • 1988
    Age 62
    In 1988, Steiger and Yvonne De Carlo played a spooky elderly couple with developmentally delayed children in John Hough's horror film American Gothic.
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  • FIFTIES
  • 1985
    Age 59
    Steiger also performed on Joni Mitchell's 1985 album Dog Eat Dog, where he provided the voice of an evangelist in the song "Tax Free".
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  • 1984
    Age 58
    In 1984, Steiger starred as a detective assigned to investigate the murder of a Chicago psychoanalyst (Roger Moore), a man whom he detests from a previous case, in Bryan Forbes's The Naked Face.
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  • 1981
    Age 55
    Later in 1981, Steiger won the Montréal World Film Festival Award for Best Actor for his portrayal of white-bearded Orthodox rabbi Reb Saunders in Jeremy Kagan's The Chosen.
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  • 1980
    Age 54
    In 1980, Steiger received two Genie Award for Best Performance by a Foreign Actor nominations for his roles in Klondike Fever and The Lucky Star, both Canadian productions.
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  • 1979
    Age 53
    After the decline of his third marriage in 1979, a deep depression, partly a side effect of his surgery, during the 1980s negatively affected his career.
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  • 1978
    Age 52
    In 1978, Steiger played a senator in Norman Jewison's F.I.S.T., opposite Sylvester Stallone, who played a Cleveland warehouse worker involved in the labor union leadership of the fictional organisation named Federation of Inter-State Truckers.
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  • FORTIES
  • 1975
    Age 49
    In 1975, Steiger portrayed Italian dictator Benito Mussolini in Carlo Lizzani's Last Days of Mussolini, which received a positive critical reception.
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  • 1971
    Age 45
    In 1971, Steiger played a chauvinistic big game hunter, explorer and war hero opposite Susannah York in Mark Robson's Happy Birthday, Wanda June, before agreeing to star alongside James Coburn as Mexican bandit Juan Miranda in Sergio Leone's Duck, You Sucker!, which was alternatively titled A Fistful of Dynamite.
  • 1969
    Age 43
    It upset him greatly when his marriage with Bloom ended in 1969 and that she quickly remarried Broadway producer Hillard Elkins the same year, a man whom Steiger had entrusted to care for her while he was away shooting Waterloo.
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    Steiger auditioned for the role of Michael Corleone in Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather (1972), a film adaptation of Italian American author Mario Puzo's 1969 novel of the same name, but Puzo felt that Steiger was too old for the part and rejected him.
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    It was entered into the Berlin International Film Festival and became the 19th most popular film at the UK box office in 1969.
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  • 1968
    Age 42
    Later in 1968, Steiger played a repressed gay non-commissioned officer opposite John Phillip Law in John Flynn's The Sergeant for Warner Bros.-Seven Arts, which earned him the David di Donatello Award for Best Foreign Actor.
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    In 1968, Steiger played a deranged serial killer opposite George Segal in Jack Smight's black comedy thriller No Way to Treat a Lady.
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  • 1967
    Age 41
    Steiger had intended returning to the stage, and had signed on to play the title character in Bertolt Brecht's Galileo, at the Lincoln Center Repertory Company in April 1967, but the production was cancelled when he became ill.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1965
    Age 39
    In 1965, Steiger played an effeminate embalmer in Tony Richardson's comedy The Loved One, about the funeral business in Los Angeles, based on the 1948 short satirical novel by Evelyn Waugh.
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  • 1962
    Age 36
    In 1962, Steiger appeared on Broadway in Moby Dick—Rehearsed, at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre, as well as playing a detective searching for a scientist's (Alan Ladd's) mugger in Philip Leacock's 13 West Street for Columbia Pictures.
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  • 1957
    Age 31
    Steiger apperared in three films released in 1957.
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  • 1956
    Age 30
    Upon its release in April 1956, a writer for Variety was impressed with the "evil venom" displayed by his character, and remarked that there had not "been as hateful a screen heavy around in a long time".
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1955
    Age 29
    Later in 1955, Steiger played an obnoxious film tycoon, loosely based on Columbia boss Harry Cohn, opposite Jack Palance and Ida Lupino in Robert Aldrich's film noir The Big Knife.
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  • 1953
    Age 27
    As Steiger refused to sign a seven-year studio contract, he was replaced with Ernest Borgnine in the film Marty (1955), which won the Academy Award for Best Picture, as well as the Best Actor Oscar for Borgnine. 1953 proved to be Steiger's breakthrough year; he garnered Sylvania Awards for Marty and four other best performances of the year—as Vishinsky and Rudolph Hess in two episodes of You Are There, as gangster Dutch Schultz in a thriller, and as a radar operator in My Brother's Keeper.
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    On May 24, 1953, Steiger played the title role in Paddy Chayefsky's "Marty" episode of the Goodyear Television Playhouse.
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    Steiger made his big screen debut in 1953, with a small role in Fred Zinnemann's Teresa, shot in 1951.
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  • 1952
    Age 26
    The following year, he played a telegraphist in the play Seagulls Over Sorrento, performed at the John Golden Theatre beginning on September 11, 1952.
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  • 1951
    Age 25
    Steiger made his film debut in Fred Zinnemann's Teresa in 1951, and subsequently appeared in films such as The Big Knife (1955), Oklahoma! (1955), Across the Bridge (1957) and Al Capone (1959).
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  • 1950
    Age 24
    The following year, Steiger appeared with Claire Bloom (whom he later married) in a Fay and Michael Kanin stage production of Akira Kurosawa's 1950 film, Rashomon, where he enacted the role of the bandit originally played by Toshiro Mifune.
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    Steiger's stage work continued in 1950, with a minor role as a townperson in a stage production of An Enemy of the People at the Music Box Theatre.
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  • 1947
    Age 21
    Subsequent to this, he received an invitation from one of his teachers, Daniel Mann, to attend the Actors Studio, established by Elia Kazan in October 1947.
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  • 1946
    Age 20
    He made his stage debut in 1946, in a production of Curse you, Jack Dalton! at the Civic Repertory Theatre of Newark, and subsequently appeared in productions such as An Enemy of the People (1950), Clifford Odets's Night Music (1951), Seagulls Over Sorrento (1952) and Rashomon (1959).
  • TEENAGE
  • 1944
    Age 18
    On December 17, 1944, Steiger and the Taussig encountered a severe typhoon, which became known as Halsey's Typhoon, that created winds reaching one hundred knots (115 mph) and waves off the coast of Luzon in the Philippines.
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    He joined the newly commissioned USS Taussig (DD-746) on May 20, 1944.
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  • 1942
    Age 16
    He enlisted on May 11, 1942, and received his training at the U.S. Naval Training Station in Newport, Rhode Island.
  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1925
    Born
    Steiger was born on April 14, 1925 in Westhampton, New York, the only child of Lorraine (née Driver) and Frederick Steiger, of French, Scottish and German descent.
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Original Authors of this text are noted here.
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