Ruby Keeler

Canadian-born American actress, dancer, singer Ruby Keeler

Ruby Keeler, born Ethel Hilda Keeler, was a Canadian-born actress, dancer and singer most famous for her on-screen coupling with Dick Powell in a string of successful early musicals at Warner Brothers, particularly 42nd Street (1933). From 1928 to 1940, she was married to singer Al Jolson. She retired from show business in the 1940s but made a widely-publicized comeback on Broadway in 1971.
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The almanac - UPI.com
Google News - over 6 years
They include Czar Ivan IV ("Ivan the Terrible") of Russia, in 1530; author Bret Harte in 1836; Joshua Lionel Cowen, inventor of the electric toy train, in 1877; dancer/actor Ruby Keeler in 1910; "Pogo" cartoonist Walt Kelly in 1913; actors Van Johnson
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'Buried Treasure,' 'Necessary Roughness' on tap tonight - New Philadelphia Times Reporter
Google News - over 6 years
“Dames,” which was released in 1934, follows at 9:15 pm The plot involves a chorus girl (Joan Blondell), producer (Dick Powell) and dancer (Ruby Keeler) who put on a Broadway show. The movie features choreography by Busby Berkeley
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Film series to screen Warner Bros. films - Arizona Daily Sun
Google News - over 6 years
6: "42nd Street" directed by Lloyd Bacon; starring Warner Baxter, Ginger Rogers, Ruby Keeler, Dick Powell; 1933, 92 min., NR. "... you're going out a youngster but you've got to come back a star!" the producer tells the ingénue, and a new genre was
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'Dames at Sea' set to sail into Portage Yacht Club - Post-Tribune
Google News - over 6 years
... choreography by Steven Spanopolous and vocal direction by Lisa Woodruff, “Dames at Sea” is an affectionate spoof of the Busby Berkeley-Harry Warren and Al Dubin-Dick Powell and Ruby Keeler-style film musicals of the 1930s
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Tinseltown as it saw itself - Bangkok Post
Google News - over 6 years
The camel was a nice touch, but after that no cliche is omitted: Mem gets her big break after a broken leg puts a front-rank star out of action (this device is used 10 years later in 42nd Street with Ruby Keeler and Bebe Daniels)
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Aural Fixation: Music in the movies and the movies on music - Weekly Alibi
Google News - almost 7 years
The title song (“naughty, gaudy, bawdy, sporty, Forty-Second Street”) sung by Ruby Keeler accompanied by a phalanx of hookers is priceless. Josef von Sternberg's tale of Weimar Republic decadence made a star of husky-voiced Marlene Dietrich as femme
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Actress gives '42nd St.' kick - ReporterHerald.com
Google News - almost 7 years
One of only a few musical movies to successfully translate to the stage, “42nd Street” began as a 1933 film starring the legendary Ruby Keeler as Peggy Sawyer and Bebe Daniels as Dorothy Brock, with Ginger Rogers, Dick Powell and George Brent
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THEATER REVIEW | 'SO HELP ME GOD!'; Fasten Your Seat Belt, Would-Be Diva
NYTimes - about 8 years
The deliciously sour ''So Help Me God!,'' a long-lost comedy from 1929, provides the same startled pleasure that comes from discovering a good, pre-code Hollywood film. If you're an addict of Turner Classic Movies, you've surely stumbled upon those sassy, gritty American flicks from the early 1930s, made before the hand of official censorship
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What's On Today
NYTimes - over 8 years
8 P.M. (TCM) TCM SPOTLIGHT: LIFE DURING THE DEPRESSION Turner Classic Movies continues its Thursdays-in-October series of films pegged to financial ruin -- both those to which audiences once flocked to escape harsh realities and more current Hollywood interpretations of the way things were. Tonight's installment begins with the ''42nd Street''
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THEATER REVIEW | LONG ISLAND; A Joyous Sendup Bursting With Can-Do Spirit
NYTimes - over 8 years
In the backstage musical ''Dames at Sea,'' the plucky actors move their show to a nearby battleship after their Broadway theater is demolished. If disaster should ever strike the Bay Street Theater, the cast could transfer to one of the many vessels docked a few yards away. Only in Sag Harbor, the ship would be a megayacht. Nearly anything nautical
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Spare Times
NYTimes - over 8 years
AROUND TOWN Museums and Sites HISTORIC RICHMOND TOWN Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., ''Yankee Peddler Day,'' with antiques, crafts and collectibles; $2, free for children under 12. Weekend hours: Friday and Saturday, 1 to 5 p.m. 441 Clarke Avenue, Richmond Town, Staten Island , (718) 351-1611, historicrichmondtown.org; $5; $4 for 65+; $3.50 for students
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THEATER REVIEW | CONNECTICUT; Precision Taps, Off-Center Orchestration
NYTimes - over 8 years
With its Victorian turrets looming grandly over the trees along the wide Connecticut River, the Goodspeed Opera House couldn't be more removed from the hurly-burly of Times Square. But step inside the door, and the blaring squawk emanating from the orchestra pit and the rat-a-tap-taps pounding the stage will carry you straight to ''that glittering
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SPRING THEATER SPECIAL | FACES TO WATCH; Faces to Watch
NYTimes - almost 9 years
IN this globalized, digitized era Josefina Scaglione could be the new Ruby Keeler. The tale of how Ms. Scaglione's YouTube video landed her an audition and then the lead in Arthur Laurents's revival of ''West Side Story'' is already on its way to becoming Broadway lore. Ms. Scaglione, 21, has appeared in a Spanish-language version of ''Hairspray''
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DANCE; The Dance Master With Kaleidoscope Eyes
NYTimes - about 9 years
He was known as Buzz and used to boast that he had never had a dance lesson in his life. He wasn't the type to gas on about his choreographic ideas, the best of which, he often said, came to him while he soaked in the bath. But the director and choreographer Busby Berkeley's vision was solidified by two seemingly disparate concepts: his
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Evelyn Keyes, 91, Whose Film Roles Included 'Gone With the Wind,' Is Dead
NYTimes - over 9 years
Evelyn Keyes, one of the last surviving co-stars of ''Gone With the Wind'' and a popular film actress in the 1940s, died on July 4 at an assisted-living home in Montecito, Calif. She was 91. Ms. Keyes died of cancer, said the producer Allan Glaser, a friend, who told The Associated Press that the announcement had been delayed until the death
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THEATER REVIEW | NO, NO NANETTE; Roaring Twenties Speakeasies With Tubs Full of Ginger Ale Fizz
NYTimes - almost 10 years
Though it is set in an era of speakeasies and bathtub gin, the 1920s musical ''No, No, Nanette'' makes only fleeting reference to cocktails. Bootleg hooch is clearly not the signature drink of the happy flappers in this show. Nor is tea, though the possibilities of its being served for two are sung about rhapsodically. It's when a character is told
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DANCE REVIEW; Gliding Through the Classics With a Sample of What's Ahead
NYTimes - almost 11 years
I come from centuries-old agricultural stock. Why do I mention this when starting to review the Monday night gala that opened American Ballet Theater's spring season at the Metropolitan Opera House? I once groaned, ''I've got to go to a gala,'' to my brother, who had then been specializing in pigs for 15 years. He replied, ''You said that in just
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Ruby Keeler
    LATE ADULTHOOD
  • 1993
    Age 82
    Keeler died of kidney cancer on February 28, 1993 in Rancho Mirage, California, and is interred in the Holy Sepulcher Cemetery in Orange, California.
  • FORTIES
  • 1954
    Age 43
    Joey D. Vieira, also known as Donald Keeler, is best remembered for portraying Sylvester "Porky" Brockway on TV's Lassie (retitled Jeff's Collie in syndicated reruns and on DVD) from 1954 to 1957.
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  • THIRTIES
  • 1941
    Age 30
    In 1941, she married John Homer Lowe, a Pasadena, California businessman and left show business the same year.
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  • TWENTIES
  • 1940
    Age 29
    Keeler and Jolson adopted a son but later divorced in 1940.
    Jolson and Keeler appeared on Broadway one last time together, for the unsuccessful show Hold On To Your Hats in 1940.
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  • 1933
    Age 22
    Following 42nd Street, Jack L. Warner gave Keeler a long-term contract and cast her in Gold Diggers of 1933, Footlight Parade, Dames and Colleen.
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    In 1933, producer Darryl F. Zanuck cast Keeler in the Warner Bros. musical 42nd Street opposite Dick Powell and Bebe Daniels.
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  • TEENAGE
  • 1928
    Age 17
    The couple married September 21, 1928, in Port Chester, New York, in a private ceremony.
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    She would appear in Ziegfeld's Whoopee! (before being replaced before the opening by the much older Ethel Shutta) in 1928, the same year she married Al Jolson.
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    From 1928 to 1940, she was married to actor and singer Al Jolson.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1909
    Age -2
    Keeler was born in Dartmouth, Halifax County, Nova Scotia in 1909 to Ralph Hector and Nellie (née Lahey) Keeler, one of six siblings in an Irish Catholic family.
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