Sharman Douglas

Socialite, talent agent Sharman Douglas

Sharman Douglas was an American socialite known for her friendship with the British royal family, in particular Princess Margaret. She was the only daughter of chemicals heiress and philanthropist Peggy Zinsser (d. 1992) and politician Lewis W. Douglas (d. 1974) who served as Arizona congressman, director of the Bureau of the Budget from 1933 until 1934, and U. S. ambassador to the Court of St. James's from 1947 until 1950.
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Death Place
New York

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Andrew Mackenzie Hay, 73, Trade Expert
NYTimes - almost 17 years
Andrew Mackenzie Hay, an importer and expert on international trade who was once married to the socialite Sharman Douglas, died in his sleep on May 2 at his home in Portland, Ore. He was 73 and had lived in Portland since 1982. He had been ill, but the exact cause of death was unclear, said his wife, Catherine. Mr. Hay, the son of a British banker,
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Sharman Douglas, 67, Socialite And Friend of British Royals
NYTimes - about 22 years
Sharman Douglas, a socialite whose life was defined by her friendship as a youth with Princess Margaret and her ensuing lifelong friendship with Britain's royal family, died on Saturday at New York Hospital. She was 67 and lived in Manhattan. John S. Zinsser Jr., a cousin, said she died of bone cancer. Miss Douglas first burst into the news as a
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 NYTimes article
Peggy Z. Douglas, a Fund-Raiser And Champion of Arts, Dies at 94
NYTimes - over 25 years
Peggy Zinsser Douglas, who helped raise hundreds of millions of dollars for the arts and other charitable causes in 60 years of volunteer work, died on Saturday at her home in Tucson, Ariz. She was 94 years old. Her family said she died of unspecified natural causes. Mrs. Douglas raised more than $100 million for the Metropolitan Opera and a few
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THE EVENING HOURS
NYTimes - over 32 years
''IT'S all very Renaissance,'' said Sally Minard the other evening. ''We have trumpeters, mimes, dancers. We draped the catacombs with a green velvet ecumenical monastery cloth. We have black candles. Oh, it's slightly decadent. And we have a Volkswagen with lights.'' For a Renaissance dance? ''We needed something for visual interest,'' said Miss
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THE EVENING HOURS
NYTimes - almost 34 years
IT was, after all, a party, and its guest of honor, Arlene Francis, wasn't complaining. She was merely wondering. ''It's been 23 years and nine months and now they're saying to me they want the station to evolve. But what is it going to evolve into?'' she asked. Before she could answer, her producer, Jean Bach, came rushing over. ''Our first guest
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THE EVENING HOURS
NYTimes - over 34 years
SHARMAN DOUGLAS thought the occasion just right for an ''Old English Hands'' party, so she invited a group of people who, she said, ''have been back and forth to England quite a bit,'' to her Fifth Avenue apartment to meet her friend Victor Emery, executive director of the Savoy group of hotels. Former Mayor John Lindsay was there and so were,
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 NYTimes article
NEW YORK ADOPTS A BRITISH ACCENT FOR ARTS FESTIVAL
NYTimes - almost 35 years
A stranger in New York these days might well be forgiven for doubting that the War of Independence was ever fought, never mind won. The city is awash, and will be for several months, in British displays, exhibitions, accents and titles. Whether more is better is a moot point but if indeed it is the British have won the national promotion
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 NYTimes article
THE EVENING HOURS
NYTimes - about 36 years
T WO men on horseback playing polo are not a common sight on Fifth Avenue at 52d Street, but they didn't actually stop traffic Wednesday night. They just slowed it a bit. A few passersby stopped to watch briefly. Others were more blase, like the two middle-age women who were hurrying along the street. One tugged at the other's sleeve when she saw
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Timeline
Learn about memorable moments in the evolution of Sharman Douglas
    LATE ADULTHOOD
  • 1996
    Age 67
    Sharman Douglas died of bone cancer at New York Hospital in 1996.
  • THIRTIES
  • 1968
    Age 39
    Sharman Douglas married Andrew MacKenzie Hay, a food importer, in 1968. They divorced in 1977.
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  • 1966
    Age 37
    At various times in her life, "Charmin' Sharman," as she was known during her father's tenure as ambassador, worked as a talent agent, a movie publicist, and a public-relations agent. In 1966, New York City mayor John Lindsay named her New York's Commissioner of Public Events.
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  • CHILDHOOD
  • 1933
    Age 4
    She was the only daughter of chemicals heiress and philanthropist Peggy Zinsser (d. 1992) and politician Lewis W. Douglas (d. 1974) who served as Arizona congressman, director of the Bureau of the Budget from 1933 until 1934, and U. S. ambassador to the Court of St. James's from 1947 until 1950.
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  • 1928
    Born
    Born on October 5, 1928.
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